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2012


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Influence of MR-based attenuation correction on lesions within bone and susceptibility artifact regions

Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Mantlik, F., Schwenzer, N., Brendle, C., Pichler, B.

Molekulare Bildgebung (MoBi), 2012 (talk)

ei

[BibTex]

2012


[BibTex]


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Reinforcement learning to adjust parametrized motor primitives to new situations

Kober, J., Wilhelm, A., Oztop, E., Peters, J.

Autonomous Robots, 33(4):361-379, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Humans manage to adapt learned movements very quickly to new situations by generalizing learned behaviors from similar situations. In contrast, robots currently often need to re-learn the complete movement. In this paper, we propose a method that learns to generalize parametrized motor plans by adapting a small set of global parameters, called meta-parameters. We employ reinforcement learning to learn the required meta-parameters to deal with the current situation, described by states. We introduce an appropriate reinforcement learning algorithm based on a kernelized version of the reward-weighted regression. To show its feasibility, we evaluate this algorithm on a toy example and compare it to several previous approaches. Subsequently, we apply the approach to three robot tasks, i.e., the generalization of throwing movements in darts, of hitting movements in table tennis, and of throwing balls where the tasks are learned on several different real physical robots, i.e., a Barrett WAM, a BioRob, the JST-ICORP/SARCOS CBi and a Kuka KR 6.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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On the Empirical Estimation of Integral Probability Metrics

Sriperumbudur, B., Fukumizu, K., Gretton, A., Schölkopf, B., Lanckriet, G.

Electronic Journal of Statistics, 6, pages: 1550-1599, 2012 (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Structured Apprenticeship Learning

Boularias, A., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

European Workshop on Reinforcement Learning (EWRL), 2012 (talk)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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PAC-Bayesian Analysis and Its Applications

Seldin, Y., Laviolette, F., Shawe-Taylor, J.

Tutorial at The European Conference on Machine Learning and Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (ECML-PKDD), 2012 (talk)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

Lois, C., Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Werner, M., Kupferschläger, J., Beyer, T.

European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 39(11):1756-1766, 2012 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Multitask Learning in Computational Biology

Widmer, C., Rätsch, G.

JMLR W\&CP. ICML 2011 Unsupervised and Transfer Learning Workshop, 27, pages: 207-216, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Computational Biology provides a wide range of applications for Multitask Learning (MTL) methods. As the generation of labels often is very costly in the biomedical domain, combining data from different related problems or tasks is a promising strategy to reduce label cost. In this paper, we present two problems from sequence biology, where MTL was successfully applied. For this, we use regularization-based MTL methods, with a special focus on the case of a hierarchical relationship between tasks. Furthermore, we propose strategies to refine the measure of task relatedness, which is of central importance in MTL and finally give some practical guidelines, when MTL strategies are likely to pay off.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Therapy monitoring of patients with chronic sclerodermic graft-versus-host-disease using PET/MRI

Sauter, A., Schmidt, H., Mantlik, F., Kolb, A., Federmann, B., Bethge, W., Reimold, M., Pfannenberg, C., Pichler, B., Horger, M.

2012 SNM Annual Meeting, 2012 (poster)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Centrality of the Mammalian Functional Brain Network

Besserve, M., Bartels, A., Murayama, Y., Logothetis, N.

42nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Mean Embeddings of POMDPs

Nishiyama, Y., Boularias, A., Gretton, A., Fukumizu, K.

21st Machine Learning Summer School , 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Bellman Equations in POMDPs

Nishiyama, Y., Boularias, A., Gretton, A., Fukumizu, K.

Technical Committee on Infomation-Based Induction Sciences and Machine Learning (IBISML'12), 2012 (talk)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Higher-Order Tensors in Diffusion MRI

Schultz, T., Fuster, A., Ghosh, A., Deriche, R., Florack, L., Lim, L.

In Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data, (Editors: Westin, C. F., Vilanova, A. and Burgeth, B.), Springer, 2012 (inbook) Accepted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Arabidopsis defense against Botrytis cinerea: chronology and regulation deciphered by high-resolution temporal transcriptomic analysis

Windram, O., Madhou, P., McHattie, S., Hill, C., Hickman, R., Cooke, E., Jenkins, DJ., Penfold, CA., Baxter, Ll., Breeze, E., Kiddle, SJ., Rhodes, J., Atwell, S., Kliebenstein, D., Kim, Y-S., Stegle, O., Borgwardt, KM., others

The Plant Cell Online, 24(9):3530-3557, 2012, all authors: Oliver Windram,Priyadharshini Madhou,Stuart McHattie,Claire Hill,Richard Hickman,Emma Cooke,Dafyd J. Jenkins,Christopher A. Penfold,Laura Baxter,Emily Breeze,Steven J. Kiddle,Johanna Rhodes,Susanna Atwell,Daniel J. (article)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Improved Linear Mixed Models for Genome-Wide Association Studies

Listgarten, J., Lippert, C., Kadie, CM., Davidson, RI., Eskin, E., Heckerman, D.

Nature Methods, 9, pages: 525–526, 2012 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Calibration of Boltzmann distribution priors in Bayesian data analysis

Mechelke, M., Habeck, M.

Physical Review E, 86(6):066705, 2012 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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CSB: A Python framework for computational structural biology

Kalev, I., Mechelke, M., Kopec, K., Holder, T., Carstens, S., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 28(22):2996-2997, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Summary: Computational Structural Biology Toolbox (CSB) is a cross-platform Python class library for reading, storing and analyzing biomolecular structures with rich support for statistical analyses. CSB is designed for reusability and extensibility and comes with a clean, well-documented API following good object-oriented engineering practice. Availability: Stable release packages are available for download from the Python Package Index (PyPI), as well as from the project’s web site http://csb.codeplex.com.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Semi-Supervised Domain Adaptation with Copulas

Lopez-Paz, D., Hernandez-Lobato, J., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2012 (poster)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Design of a Haptic Interface for a Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Simulation

Yu, S., Woo, H. S., Son, H. I., Ahn, W., Jung, H., Lee, D. Y., Yi, S. Y.

Advanced Robotics, 26(18):2115-2143, 2012 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Evaluation of Whole-Body MR-Based Attenuation Correction in Bone and Soft Tissue Lesions

Bezrukov, I., Mantlik, F., Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Brendle, C., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS-MIC), 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Beta oscillations propagate as traveling waves in the macaque prefrontal cortex

Panagiotaropoulos, T., Besserve, M., Logothetis, N.

42nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), 2012 (talk)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Significant global reduction of carbon uptake by water-cycle driven extreme vegetation anomalies

Zscheischler, J., Mahecha, M., von Buttlar, J., Harmeling, S., Jung, M., Randerson, J., Reichstein, M.

Nature Geoscience, 2012 (article) In revision

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The PET Performance Measurements of A Next Generation Dedicated Small Animal PET/MR Scanner

Liu, C., Hossain, M., Bezrukov, I., Wehrl, H., Kolb, A., Judenhofer, M., Pichler, B.

World Molecular Imaging Congress (WMIC), 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Measurement and calibration of noise bias in weak lensing galaxy shape estimation

Kacprzak, T., Zuntz, J., Rowe, B., Bridle, S., Refregier, A., Amara, A., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 427(4):2711-2722, Oxford University Press, 2012 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Image analysis for cosmology: results from the GREAT10 Galaxy Challenge

Kitching, T. D., Balan, S. T., Bridle, S., Cantale, N., Courbin, F., Eifler, T., Gentile, M., Gill, M. S. S., Harmeling, S., Heymans, C., others,

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 423(4):3163-3208, Oxford University Press, 2012 (article)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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First SN Discoveries from the Dark Energy Survey

Abbott, T., Abdalla, F., Achitouv, I., Ahn, E., Aldering, G., Allam, S., Alonso, D., Amara, A., Annis, J., Antonik, M., others,

The Astronomer's Telegram, 4668, pages: 1, 2012 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A sensorimotor paradigm for Bayesian model selection

Genewein, T, Braun, DA

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6(291):1-16, October 2012 (article)

Abstract
Sensorimotor control is thought to rely on predictive internal models in order to cope efficiently with uncertain environments. Recently, it has been shown that humans not only learn different internal models for different tasks, but that they also extract common structure between tasks. This raises the question of how the motor system selects between different structures or models, when each model can be associated with a range of different task-specific parameters. Here we design a sensorimotor task that requires subjects to compensate visuomotor shifts in a three-dimensional virtual reality setup, where one of the dimensions can be mapped to a model variable and the other dimension to the parameter variable. By introducing probe trials that are neutral in the parameter dimension, we can directly test for model selection. We found that model selection procedures based on Bayesian statistics provided a better explanation for subjects’ choice behavior than simple non-probabilistic heuristics. Our experimental design lends itself to the general study of model selection in a sensorimotor context as it allows to separately query model and parameter variables from subjects.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Risk-Sensitivity in Bayesian Sensorimotor Integration

Grau-Moya, J, Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

PLoS Computational Biology, 8(9):1-7, sep 2012 (article)

Abstract
Information processing in the nervous system during sensorimotor tasks with inherent uncertainty has been shown to be consistent with Bayesian integration. Bayes optimal decision-makers are, however, risk-neutral in the sense that they weigh all possibilities based on prior expectation and sensory evidence when they choose the action with highest expected value. In contrast, risk-sensitive decision-makers are sensitive to model uncertainty and bias their decision-making processes when they do inference over unobserved variables. In particular, they allow deviations from their probabilistic model in cases where this model makes imprecise predictions. Here we test for risk-sensitivity in a sensorimotor integration task where subjects exhibit Bayesian information integration when they infer the position of a target from noisy sensory feedback. When introducing a cost associated with subjects' response, we found that subjects exhibited a characteristic bias towards low cost responses when their uncertainty was high. This result is in accordance with risk-sensitive decision-making processes that allow for deviations from Bayes optimal decision-making in the face of uncertainty. Our results suggest that both Bayesian integration and risk-sensitivity are important factors to understand sensorimotor integration in a quantitative fashion.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2009


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Machine Learning for Brain-Computer Interfaces

Hill, NJ.

Mini-Symposia on Assistive Machine Learning for People with Disabilities at NIPS (AMD), December 2009 (talk)

Abstract
Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) aim to be the ultimate in assistive technology: decoding a user‘s intentions directly from brain signals without involving any muscles or peripheral nerves. Thus, some classes of BCI potentially offer hope for users with even the most extreme cases of paralysis, such as in late-stage Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, where nothing else currently allows communication of any kind. Other lines in BCI research aim to restore lost motor function in as natural a way as possible, reconnecting and in some cases re-training motor-cortical areas to control prosthetic, or previously paretic, limbs. Research and development are progressing on both invasive and non-invasive fronts, although BCI has yet to make a breakthrough to widespread clinical application. The high-noise high-dimensional nature of brain-signals, particularly in non-invasive approaches and in patient populations, make robust decoding techniques a necessity. Generally, the approach has been to use relatively simple feature extraction techniques, such as template matching and band-power estimation, coupled to simple linear classifiers. This has led to a prevailing view among applied BCI researchers that (sophisticated) machine-learning is irrelevant since "it doesn‘t matter what classifier you use once you‘ve done your preprocessing right and extracted the right features." I shall show a few examples of how this runs counter to both the empirical reality and the spirit of what needs to be done to bring BCI into clinical application. Along the way I‘ll highlight some of the interesting problems that remain open for machine-learners.

ei

PDF Web Web [BibTex]

2009


PDF Web Web [BibTex]


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Efficient Subwindow Search: A Branch and Bound Framework for Object Localization

Lampert, C., Blaschko, M., Hofmann, T.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 31(12):2129-2142, December 2009 (article)

Abstract
Most successful object recognition systems rely on binary classification, deciding only if an object is present or not, but not providing information on the actual object location. To estimate the object‘s location, one can take a sliding window approach, but this strongly increases the computational cost because the classifier or similarity function has to be evaluated over a large set of candidate subwindows. In this paper, we propose a simple yet powerful branch and bound scheme that allows efficient maximization of a large class of quality functions over all possible subimages. It converges to a globally optimal solution typically in linear or even sublinear time, in contrast to the quadratic scaling of exhaustive or sliding window search. We show how our method is applicable to different object detection and image retrieval scenarios. The achieved speedup allows the use of classifiers for localization that formerly were considered too slow for this task, such as SVMs with a spatial pyramid kernel or nearest-neighbor classifiers based on the chi^2 distance. We demonstrate state-of-the-art localization performance of the resulting systems on the UIUC Cars data set, the PASCAL VOC 2006 data set, and in the PASCAL VOC 2007 competition.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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PAC-Bayesian Approach to Formulation of Clustering Objectives

Seldin, Y.

NIPS Workshop on "Clustering: Science or Art? Towards Principled Approaches", December 2009 (talk)

Abstract
Clustering is a widely used tool for exploratory data analysis. However, the theoretical understanding of clustering is very limited. We still do not have a well-founded answer to the seemingly simple question of "how many clusters are present in the data?", and furthermore a formal comparison of clusterings based on different optimization objectives is far beyond our abilities. The lack of good theoretical support gives rise to multiple heuristics that confuse the practitioners and stall development of the field. We suggest that the ill-posed nature of clustering problems is caused by the fact that clustering is often taken out of its subsequent application context. We argue that one does not cluster the data just for the sake of clustering it, but rather to facilitate the solution of some higher level task. By evaluation of the clustering‘s contribution to the solution of the higher level task it is possible to compare different clusterings, even those obtained by different optimization objectives. In the preceding work it was shown that such an approach can be applied to evaluation and design of co-clustering solutions. Here we suggest that this approach can be extended to other settings, where clustering is applied.

ei

PDF Web Web [BibTex]

PDF Web Web [BibTex]


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Generation of three-dimensional random rotations in fitting and matching problems

Habeck, M.

Computational Statistics, 24(4):719-731, December 2009 (article)

Abstract
An algorithm is developed to generate random rotations in three-dimensional space that follow a probability distribution arising in fitting and matching problems. The rotation matrices are orthogonally transformed into an optimal basis and then parameterized using Euler angles. The conditional distributions of the three Euler angles have a very simple form: the two azimuthal angles can be decoupled by sampling their sum and difference from a von Mises distribution; the cosine of the polar angle is exponentially distributed and thus straighforward to generate. Simulation results are shown and demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The algorithm is compared to other methods for generating random rotations such as a random walk Metropolis scheme and a Gibbs sampling algorithm recently introduced by Green and Mardia. Finally, the algorithm is applied to a probabilistic version of the Procrustes problem of fitting two point sets and applied in the context of protein structure superposition.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Semi-supervised Kernel Canonical Correlation Analysis of Human Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data

Shelton, JA.

Women in Machine Learning Workshop (WiML), December 2009 (talk)

Abstract
Kernel Canonical Correlation Analysis (KCCA) is a general technique for subspace learning that incorporates principal components analysis (PCA) and Fisher linear discriminant analysis (LDA) as special cases. By finding directions that maximize correlation, KCCA learns representations tied more closely to underlying process generating the the data and can ignore high-variance noise directions. However, for data where acquisition in a given modality is expensive or otherwise limited, KCCA may suffer from small sample effects. We propose to use semi-supervised Laplacian regularization to utilize data that are present in only one modality. This manifold learning approach is able to find highly correlated directions that also lie along the data manifold, resulting in a more robust estimate of correlated subspaces. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquired data are naturally amenable to subspace techniques as data are well aligned and such data of the human brain are a particularly interesting candidate. In this study we implemented various supervised and semi-supervised versions of KCCA on human fMRI data, with regression to single and multivariate labels (corresponding to video content subjects viewed during the image acquisition). In each variate condition, Laplacian regularization improved performance whereas the semi-supervised variants of KCCA yielded the best performance. We additionally analyze the weights learned by the regression in order to infer brain regions that are important during different types of visual processing.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Adaptive Importance Sampling for Value Function Approximation in Off-policy Reinforcement Learning

Hachiya, H., Akiyama, T., Sugiyama, M., Peters, J.

Neural Networks, 22(10):1399-1410, December 2009 (article)

Abstract
Off-policy reinforcement learning is aimed at efficiently using data samples gathered from a policy that is different from the currently optimized policy. A common approach is to use importance sampling techniques for compensating for the bias of value function estimators caused by the difference between the data-sampling policy and the target policy. However, existing off-policy methods often do not take the variance of the value function estimators explicitly into account and therefore their performance tends to be unstable. To cope with this problem, we propose using an adaptive importance sampling technique which allows us to actively control the trade-off between bias and variance. We further provide a method for optimally determining the trade-off parameter based on a variant of cross-validation. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach through simulations.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Guest editorial: special issue on structured prediction

Parker, C., Altun, Y., Tadepalli, P.

Machine Learning, 77(2-3):161-164, December 2009 (article)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Structured prediction by joint kernel support estimation

Lampert, CH., Blaschko, MB.

Machine Learning, 77(2-3):249-269, December 2009 (article)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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A note on ethical aspects of BCI

Haselager, P., Vlek, R., Hill, J., Nijboer, F.

Neural Networks, 22(9):1352-1357, November 2009 (article)

Abstract
This paper focuses on ethical aspects of BCI, as a research and a clinical tool, that are challenging for practitioners currently working in the field. Specifically, the difficulties involved in acquiring informed consent from locked-in patients are investigated, in combination with an analysis of the shared moral responsibility in BCI teams, and the complications encountered in establishing effective communication with media.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Model Learning with Local Gaussian Process Regression

Nguyen-Tuong, D., Seeger, M., Peters, J.

Advanced Robotics, 23(15):2015-2034, November 2009 (article)

Abstract
Precise models of robot inverse dynamics allow the design of significantly more accurate, energy-efficient and compliant robot control. However, in some cases the accuracy of rigid-body models does not suffice for sound control performance due to unmodeled nonlinearities arising from hydraulic cable dynamics, complex friction or actuator dynamics. In such cases, estimating the inverse dynamics model from measured data poses an interesting alternative. Nonparametric regression methods, such as Gaussian process regression (GPR) or locally weighted projection regression (LWPR), are not as restrictive as parametric models and, thus, offer a more flexible framework for approximating unknown nonlinearities. In this paper, we propose a local approximation to the standard GPR, called local GPR (LGP), for real-time model online learning by combining the strengths of both regression methods, i.e., the high accuracy of GPR and the fast speed of LWPR. The approach is shown to have competitive learning performance for hig h-dimensional data while being sufficiently fast for real-time learning. The effectiveness of LGP is exhibited by a comparison with the state-of-the-art regression techniques, such as GPR, LWPR and ν-support vector regression. The applicability of the proposed LGP method is demonstrated by real-time online learning of the inverse dynamics model for robot model-based control on a Barrett WAM robot arm.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Event-Related Potentials in Brain-Computer Interfacing

Hill, NJ.

Invited lecture on the bachelor & masters course "Introduction to Brain-Computer Interfacing", October 2009 (talk)

Abstract
An introduction to event-related potentials with specific reference to their use in brain-computer interfacing applications and research.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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BCI2000 and Python

Hill, NJ.

Invited lecture at the 5th International BCI2000 Workshop, October 2009 (talk)

Abstract
A tutorial, with exercises, on how to integrate your own Python code with the BCI2000 software package.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Implementing a Signal Processing Filter in BCI2000 Using C++

Hill, NJ., Mellinger, J.

Invited lecture at the 5th International BCI2000 Workshop, October 2009 (talk)

Abstract
This tutorial shows how the functionality of the BCI2000 software package can be extended with one‘s own code, using BCI2000‘s C++ API.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Inferring textual entailment with a probabilistically sound calculus

Harmeling, S.

Natural Language Engineering, 15(4):459-477, October 2009 (article)

Abstract
We introduce a system for textual entailment that is based on a probabilistic model of entailment. The model is defined using a calculus of transformations on dependency trees, which is characterized by the fact that derivations in that calculus preserve the truth only with a certain probability. The calculus is successfully evaluated on the datasets of the PASCAL Challenge on Recognizing Textual Entailment.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Modeling and Visualizing Uncertainty in Gene Expression Clusters using Dirichlet Process Mixtures

Rasmussen, CE., de la Cruz, BJ., Ghahramani, Z., Wild, DL.

IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, 6(4):615-628, October 2009 (article)

Abstract
Although the use of clustering methods has rapidly become one of the standard computational approaches in the literature of microarray gene expression data, little attention has been paid to uncertainty in the results obtained. Dirichlet process mixture models provide a non-parametric Bayesian alternative to the bootstrap approach to modeling uncertainty in gene expression clustering. Most previously published applications of Bayesian model based clustering methods have been to short time series data. In this paper we present a case study of the application of non-parametric Bayesian clustering methods to the clustering of high-dimensional non-time series gene expression data using full Gaussian covariances. We use the probability that two genes belong to the same cluster in a Dirichlet process mixture model as a measure of the similarity of these gene expression profiles. Conversely, this probability can be used to define a dissimilarity measure, which, for the purposes of visualization, can be input to one of the standard linkage algorithms used for hierarchical clustering. Biologically plausible results are obtained from the Rosetta compendium of expression profiles which extend previously published cluster analyses of this data.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Clinical PET/MRI-System and Its Applications with MRI Based Attenuation Correction

Kolb, A., Hofmann, M., Sossi, V., Wehrl, H., Sauter, A., Schmid, A., Schlemmer, H., Claussen, C., Pichler, B.

IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC 2009), 2009, pages: 1, October 2009 (poster)

Abstract
Clinical PET/MRI is an emerging new hybrid imaging modality. In addition to provide an unique possibility for multifunctional imaging with temporally and spatially matched data, it also provides anatomical information that can also be used for attenuation correction with no radiation exposure to the subjects. A plus of combined compared to sequential PET and MR imaging is the reduction of total scan time. Here we present our initial experience with a hybrid brain PET/MRI system. Due to the ethical approval patient scans could only be performed after a diagnostic PET/CT. We estimate that in approximately 50% of the cases PET/MRI was of superior diagnostic value compared to PET/CT and was able to provide additional information, such as DTI, spectroscopy and Time Of Flight (TOF) angiography. Here we present 3 patient cases in oncology, a retropharyngeal carcinoma in neurooncology, a relapsing meningioma and in neurology a pharyngeal carcinoma in addition to an infraction of the right hemisphere. For quantitative PET imaging attenuation correction is obligatory. In current PET/MRI setup we used our MRI based atlas method for calculating the mu-map for attenuation correction. MR-based attenuation correction accuracy was quantitatively compared to CT-based PET attenuation correction. Extensive studies to assess potential mutual interferences between PET and MR imaging modalities as well as NEMA measurements have been performed. The first patient studies as well as the phantom tests clearly demonstrated the overall good imaging performance of this first human PET/MRI system. Ongoing work concentrates on advanced normalization and reconstruction methods incorporating count-rate based algorithms.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Thermodynamic efficiency of information and heat flow

Allahverdyan, A., Janzing, D., Mahler, G.

Journal of Statistical Mechanics: Theory and Experiment, 2009(09):P09011, September 2009 (article)

Abstract
A basic task of information processing is information transfer (flow). P0 Here we study a pair of Brownian particles each coupled to a thermal bath at temperatures T1 and T2 . The information flow in such a system is defined via the time-shifted mutual information. The information flow nullifies at equilibrium, and its efficiency is defined as the ratio of the flow to the total entropy production in the system. For a stationary state the information flows from higher to lower temperatures, and its efficiency is bounded from above by (max[T1 , T2 ])/(|T1 − T2 |). This upper bound is imposed by the second law and it quantifies the thermodynamic cost for information flow in the present class of systems. It can be reached in the adiabatic situation, where the particles have widely different characteristic times. The efficiency of heat flow—defined as the heat flow over the total amount of dissipated heat—is limited from above by the same factor. There is a complementarity between heat and information flow: the set-up which is most efficient for the former is the least efficient for the latter and vice versa. The above bound for the efficiency can be (transiently) overcome in certain non-stationary situations, but the efficiency is still limited from above. We study yet another measure of information processing (transfer entropy) proposed in the literature. Though this measure does not require any thermodynamic cost, the information flow and transfer entropy are shown to be intimately related for stationary states.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Does Cognitive Science Need Kernels?

Jäkel, F., Schölkopf, B., Wichmann, F.

Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 13(9):381-388, September 2009 (article)

Abstract
Kernel methods are among the most successful tools in machine learning and are used in challenging data analysis problems in many disciplines. Here we provide examples where kernel methods have proven to be powerful tools for analyzing behavioral data, especially for identifying features in categorization experiments. We also demonstrate that kernel methods relate to perceptrons and exemplar models of categorization. Hence, we argue that kernel methods have neural and psychological plausibility, and theoretical results concerning their behavior are therefore potentially relevant for human category learning. In particular, we believe kernel methods have the potential to provide explanations ranging from the implementational via the algorithmic to the computational level.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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A flowering-time gene network model for association analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana

Klotzbücher, K., Kobayashi, Y., Shervashidze, N., Borgwardt, K., Weigel, D.

2009(39):95-96, German Conference on Bioinformatics (GCB '09), September 2009 (poster)

Abstract
In our project we want to determine a set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which have a major effect on the flowering time of Arabidopsis thaliana. Instead of performing a genome-wide association study on all SNPs in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the subset of SNPs from the flowering-time gene network model. We are interested in how the results of the association study vary when using only the ascertained subset of SNPs from the flowering network model, and when additionally using the information encoded by the structure of the network model. The network model is compiled from the literature by manual analysis and contains genes which have been found to affect the flowering time of Arabidopsis thaliana [Far+08; KW07]. The genes in this model are annotated with the SNPs that are located in these genes, or in near proximity to them. In a baseline comparison between the subset of SNPs from the graph and the set of all SNPs, we omit the structural information and calculate the correlation between the individual SNPs and the flowering time phenotype by use of statistical methods. Through this we can determine the subset of SNPs with the highest correlation to the flowering time. In order to further refine this subset, we include the additional information provided by the network structure by conducting a graph-based feature pre-selection. In the further course of this project we want to validate and examine the resulting set of SNPs and their corresponding genes with experimental methods.

ei

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PDF Web [BibTex]


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Robot Learning

Peters, J., Morimoto, J., Tedrake, R., Roy, N.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine, 16(3):19-20, September 2009 (article)

Abstract
Creating autonomous robots that can learn to act in unpredictable environments has been a long-standing goal of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. In contrast, current commercially available industrial and service robots mostly execute fixed tasks and exhibit little adaptability. To bridge this gap, machine learning offers a myriad set of methods, some of which have already been applied with great success to robotics problems. As a result, there is an increasing interest in machine learning and statistics within the robotics community. At the same time, there has been a growth in the learning community in using robots as motivating applications for new algorithms and formalisms. Considerable evidence of this exists in the use of learning in high-profile competitions such as RoboCup and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) challenges, and the growing number of research programs funded by governments around the world.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]