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2003


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Interactive Images

Toyama, K., Schölkopf, B.

(MSR-TR-2003-64), Microsoft Research, Cambridge, UK, 2003 (techreport)

Abstract
Interactive Images are a natural extension of three recent developments: digital photography, interactive web pages, and browsable video. An interactive image is a multi-dimensional image, displayed two dimensions at a time (like a standard digital image), but with which a user can interact to browse through the other dimensions. One might consider a standard video sequence viewed with a video player as a simple interactive image with time as the third dimension. Interactive images are a generalization of this idea, in which the third (and greater) dimensions may be focus, exposure, white balance, saturation, and other parameters. Interaction is handled via a variety of modes including those we call ordinal, pixel-indexed, cumulative, and comprehensive. Through exploration of three novel forms of interactive images based on color, exposure, and focus, we will demonstrate the compelling nature of interactive images.

ei

Web [BibTex]

2003


Web [BibTex]


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Semi-Supervised Learning through Principal Directions Estimation

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B., Weston, J.

In ICML Workshop, The Continuum from Labeled to Unlabeled Data in Machine Learning & Data Mining, pages: 7, ICML Workshop: The Continuum from Labeled to Unlabeled Data in Machine Learning & Data Mining, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe methods for taking into account unlabeled data in the training of a kernel-based classifier, such as a Support Vector Machines (SVM). We propose two approaches utilizing unlabeled points in the vicinity of labeled ones. Both of the approaches effectively modify the metric of the pattern space, either by using non-spherical Gaussian density estimates which are determined using EM, or by modifying the kernel function using displacement vectors computed from pairs of unlabeled and labeled points. The latter is linked to techniques for training invariant SVMs. We present experimental results indicating that the proposed technique can lead to substantial improvements of classification accuracy.

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PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning and Kernel Methods

Navia-Vázquez, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Adaptivity and Learning—An Interdisciplinary Debate, pages: 161-186, (Editors: R.Kühn and R Menzel and W Menzel and U Ratsch and MM Richter and I-O Stamatescu), Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Short Introduction to Learning with Kernels

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Proceedings of the Machine Learning Summer School, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 2600, pages: 41-64, LNAI 2600, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian Kernel Methods

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advanced Lectures on Machine Learning, Machine Learning Summer School 2002, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 2600, LNAI 2600, pages: 65-117, 0, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Gene expression in chondrocytes assessed with use of microarrays

Aigner, T., Zien, A., Hanisch, D., Zimmer, R.

Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 85(Suppl 2):117-123, 2003 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Machine Learning with Hyperkernels

Ong, CS., Smola, AJ.

In pages: 568-575, 2003 (inproceedings)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Gaussian Processes to Speed up Hybrid Monte Carlo for Expensive Bayesian Integrals

Rasmussen, CE.

In Bayesian Statistics 7, pages: 651-659, (Editors: J. M. Bernardo, M. J. Bayarri, J. O. Berger, A. P. Dawid, D. Heckerman, A. F. M. Smith and M. West), Bayesian Statistics 7, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) is often the method of choice for computing Bayesian integrals that are not analytically tractable. However the success of this method may require a very large number of evaluations of the (un-normalized) posterior and its partial derivatives. In situations where the posterior is computationally costly to evaluate, this may lead to an unacceptable computational load for HMC. I propose to use a Gaussian Process model of the (log of the) posterior for most of the computations required by HMC. Within this scheme only occasional evaluation of the actual posterior is required to guarantee that the samples generated have exactly the desired distribution, even if the GP model is somewhat inaccurate. The method is demonstrated on a 10 dimensional problem, where 200 evaluations suffice for the generation of 100 roughly independent points from the posterior. Thus, the proposed scheme allows Bayesian treatment of models with posteriors that are computationally demanding, such as models involving computer simulation.

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PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Dimension Reduction Based on Orthogonality — a Decorrelation Method in ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Artificial Neural Networks and Neural Information Processing - ICANN/ICONIP 2003, pages: 132-139, (Editors: O Kaynak and E Alpaydin and E Oja and L Xu), Springer, Berlin, Germany, International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks and International Conference on Neural Information Processing, ICANN/ICONIP, 2003, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 2714 (inproceedings)

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Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Stability of ensembles of kernel machines

Elisseeff, A., Pontil, M.

In 190, pages: 111-124, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Science, (Editors: Suykens, J., G. Horvath, S. Basu, C. Micchelli and J. Vandewalle), IOS press, Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Models of contrast transfer as a function of presentation time and spatial frequency.

Wichmann, F.

2003 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast transduction is essential for understanding spatial vision. Using standard 2AFC contrast discrimination experiments conducted using a carefully calibrated display we previously showed that the shape of the threshold versus (pedestal) contrast (TvC) curve changes with presentation time and the performance level defined as threshold (Wichmann, 1999; Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Additional experiments looked at the change of the TvC curve with spatial frequency (Bird, Henning & Wichmann, 2002), and at how to constrain the parameters of models of contrast processing (Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results both across spatial frequency and presentation time. An extensive model-selection exploration was performed using Bayesian confidence regions for the fitted parameters as well as cross-validation methods. Bird, C.M., G.B. Henning and F.A. Wichmann (2002). Contrast discrimination with sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequency. Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19, 1267-1273. Wichmann, F.A. (1999). Some aspects of modelling human spatial vision: contrast discrimination. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Oxford. Wichmann, F.A. & Henning, G.B. (1999). Implications of the Pedestal Effect for Models of Contrast-Processing and Gain-Control. OSA Annual Meeting Program, 62. Wichmann, F.A. (2002). Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 2, 7a.

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[BibTex]