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2003


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Semi-Supervised Learning through Principal Directions Estimation

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B., Weston, J.

In ICML Workshop, The Continuum from Labeled to Unlabeled Data in Machine Learning & Data Mining, pages: 7, ICML Workshop: The Continuum from Labeled to Unlabeled Data in Machine Learning & Data Mining, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe methods for taking into account unlabeled data in the training of a kernel-based classifier, such as a Support Vector Machines (SVM). We propose two approaches utilizing unlabeled points in the vicinity of labeled ones. Both of the approaches effectively modify the metric of the pattern space, either by using non-spherical Gaussian density estimates which are determined using EM, or by modifying the kernel function using displacement vectors computed from pairs of unlabeled and labeled points. The latter is linked to techniques for training invariant SVMs. We present experimental results indicating that the proposed technique can lead to substantial improvements of classification accuracy.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

2003


PostScript [BibTex]


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Machine Learning with Hyperkernels

Ong, CS., Smola, AJ.

In pages: 568-575, 2003 (inproceedings)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Gaussian Processes to Speed up Hybrid Monte Carlo for Expensive Bayesian Integrals

Rasmussen, CE.

In Bayesian Statistics 7, pages: 651-659, (Editors: J. M. Bernardo, M. J. Bayarri, J. O. Berger, A. P. Dawid, D. Heckerman, A. F. M. Smith and M. West), Bayesian Statistics 7, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) is often the method of choice for computing Bayesian integrals that are not analytically tractable. However the success of this method may require a very large number of evaluations of the (un-normalized) posterior and its partial derivatives. In situations where the posterior is computationally costly to evaluate, this may lead to an unacceptable computational load for HMC. I propose to use a Gaussian Process model of the (log of the) posterior for most of the computations required by HMC. Within this scheme only occasional evaluation of the actual posterior is required to guarantee that the samples generated have exactly the desired distribution, even if the GP model is somewhat inaccurate. The method is demonstrated on a 10 dimensional problem, where 200 evaluations suffice for the generation of 100 roughly independent points from the posterior. Thus, the proposed scheme allows Bayesian treatment of models with posteriors that are computationally demanding, such as models involving computer simulation.

ei

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Dimension Reduction Based on Orthogonality — a Decorrelation Method in ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Artificial Neural Networks and Neural Information Processing - ICANN/ICONIP 2003, pages: 132-139, (Editors: O Kaynak and E Alpaydin and E Oja and L Xu), Springer, Berlin, Germany, International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks and International Conference on Neural Information Processing, ICANN/ICONIP, 2003, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 2714 (inproceedings)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Bayesian backfitting

D’Souza, A., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the 10th Joint Symposium on Neural Computation (JSNC 2003), Irvine, CA, May 2003, 2003, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present an algorithm aimed at addressing both computational and analytical intractability of Bayesian regression models which operate in very high-dimensional, usually underconstrained spaces. Several domains of research frequently provide such datasets, including chemometrics [2], and human movement analysis [1]. The literature in nonparametric statistics provides interesting solutions such as Backfitting [3] and Partial Least Squares [4], which are extremely robust and efficient, yet lack a probabilistic interpretation that could place them in the context of current research in statistical learning algorithms that emphasize the estimation of confidence, posterior distributions, and model complexity. In order to achieve numerical robustness and low computational cost, we first derive a novel Bayesian interpretation of Backfitting (BB) as a computationally efficient regression algorithm. BBÕs learning complexity scales linearly with the input dimensionality by decoupling inference among individual input dimensions. We embed BB in an efficient, locally variational model selection mechanism that automatically grows the number of backfitting experts in a mixture-of-experts regression model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in performing principled regularization of model complexity when fitting nonlinear manifolds while avoiding the numerical hazards associated with highly underconstrained problems. We also note that this algorithm appears applicable in various areas of neural computation, e.g., in abstract models of computational neuroscience, or implementations of statistical learning on artificial systems.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Reinforcement learning for humanoid robotics

Peters, J., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids2003), Karlsruhe, Germany, Sept.29-30, 2003, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Reinforcement learning offers one of the most general framework to take traditional robotics towards true autonomy and versatility. However, applying reinforcement learning to high dimensional movement systems like humanoid robots remains an unsolved problem. In this paper, we discuss different approaches of reinforcement learning in terms of their applicability in humanoid robotics. Methods can be coarsely classified into three different categories, i.e., greedy methods, `vanilla' policy gradient methods, and natural gradient methods. We discuss that greedy methods are not likely to scale into the domain humanoid robotics as they are problematic when used with function approximation. `Vanilla' policy gradient methods on the other hand have been successfully applied on real-world robots including at least one humanoid robot. We demonstrate that these methods can be significantly improved using the natural policy gradient instead of the regular policy gradient. A derivation of the natural policy gradient is provided, proving that the average policy gradient of Kakade (2002) is indeed the true natural gradient. A general algorithm for estimating the natural gradient, the Natural Actor-Critic algorithm, is introduced. This algorithm converges to the nearest local minimum of the cost function with respect to the Fisher information metric under suitable conditions. The algorithm outperforms non-natural policy gradients by far in a cart-pole balancing evaluation, and for learning nonlinear dynamic motor primitives for humanoid robot control. It offers a promising route for the development of reinforcement learning for truly high dimensionally continuous state-action systems.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Accuracy of manual spike sorting: Results for the Utah intracortical array

Wood, F., Fellows, M., Vargas-Irwin, C., Black, M. J., Donoghue, J. P.

Program No. 279.2. 2003, Abstract Viewer and Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2003, Online (conference)

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abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]


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Specular flow and the perception of surface reflectance

Roth, S., Domini, F., Black, M. J.

Journal of Vision, 3 (9): 413a, 2003 (conference)

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abstract poster [BibTex]

abstract poster [BibTex]


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Grain boundary phase transitions in the Al-Mg system and their influence on high-strain rate superplasticity

Straumal, B. B., Lopez, G. A., Mittemeijer, E. J., Gust, W., Zhilyaev, A. P.

In 216-217, pages: 307-312, Moscow, Russia, 2003 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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High aspect ratio polymer micro/nano-structure manufacturing using nanoembossing, nanomolding and directed self-assembly

Sitti, M.

In ASME 2003 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, pages: 293-297, 2003 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Nsf workshop on future directions in nano-scale systems, dynamics and control

Sitti, M.

In Automatic Control Conference (ACC), 2003 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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3-D nano-fiber manufacturing by controlled pulling of liquid polymers using nano-probes

Nain, A. S., Sitti, M.

In Nanotechnology, 2003. IEEE-NANO 2003. 2003 Third IEEE Conference on, 1, pages: 60-63, 2003 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Discovering imitation strategies through categorization of multi-cimensional data

Billard, A., Epars, Y., Schaal, S., Cheng, G.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2003), Las Vegas, NV, Oct. 27-31, 2003, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
An essential problem of imitation is that of determining Ówhat to imitateÓ, i.e. to determine which of the many features of the demonstration are relevant to the task and which should be reproduced. The strategy followed by the imitator can be modeled as a hierarchical optimization system, which minimizes the discrepancy between two multidimensional datasets. We consider imitation of a manipulation task. To classify across manipulation strategies, we apply a probabilistic analysis to data in Cartesian and joint spaces. We determine a general metric that optimizes the policy of task reproduction, following strategy determination. The model successfully discovers strategies in six different manipulation tasks and controls task reproduction by a full body humanoid robot. or the complete path followed by the demonstrator. We follow a similar taxonomy and apply it to the learning and reproduction of a manipulation task by a humanoid robot. We take the perspective that the features of the movements to imitate are those that appear most frequently, i.e. the invariants in time. The model builds upon previous work [3], [4] and is composed of a hierarchical time delay neural network that extracts invariant features from a manipulation task performed by a human demonstrator. The system analyzes the Carthesian trajectories of the objects and the joint

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Scaling reinforcement learning paradigms for motor learning

Peters, J., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the 10th Joint Symposium on Neural Computation (JSNC 2003), Irvine, CA, May 2003, 2003, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Reinforcement learning offers a general framework to explain reward related learning in artificial and biological motor control. However, current reinforcement learning methods rarely scale to high dimensional movement systems and mainly operate in discrete, low dimensional domains like game-playing, artificial toy problems, etc. This drawback makes them unsuitable for application to human or bio-mimetic motor control. In this poster, we look at promising approaches that can potentially scale and suggest a novel formulation of the actor-critic algorithm which takes steps towards alleviating the current shortcomings. We argue that methods based on greedy policies are not likely to scale into high-dimensional domains as they are problematic when used with function approximation Ð a must when dealing with continuous domains. We adopt the path of direct policy gradient based policy improvements since they avoid the problems of unstabilizing dynamics encountered in traditional value iteration based updates. While regular policy gradient methods have demonstrated promising results in the domain of humanoid notor control, we demonstrate that these methods can be significantly improved using the natural policy gradient instead of the regular policy gradient. Based on this, it is proved that KakadeÕs Ôaverage natural policy gradientÕ is indeed the true natural gradient. A general algorithm for estimating the natural gradient, the Natural Actor-Critic algorithm, is introduced. This algorithm converges with probability one to the nearest local minimum in Riemannian space of the cost function. The algorithm outperforms nonnatural policy gradients by far in a cart-pole balancing evaluation, and offers a promising route for the development of reinforcement learning for truly high-dimensionally continuous state-action systems.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Influence of grain boundary phase transitions on the diffusion-related properties

Straumal, B., Baretzky, B.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Diffusion, Segregation and Stresses in Materials, pages: 53-64, Defect and Diffusion Forum, Scitec Publications Ltd., Moscow, Russia, 2003 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Are carbon nanostructures an efficient hydrogen storage medium?

Hirscher, M., Becher, M., Haluska, M., von Zeppelin, F., Chen, X., Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U., Roth, S.

In 356-357, pages: 433-437, Annecy, France, 2003 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning attractor landscapes for learning motor primitives

Ijspeert, A., Nakanishi, J., Schaal, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1547-1554, (Editors: Becker, S.;Thrun, S.;Obermayer, K.), Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
If globally high dimensional data has locally only low dimensional distributions, it is advantageous to perform a local dimensionality reduction before further processing the data. In this paper we examine several techniques for local dimensionality reduction in the context of locally weighted linear regression. As possible candidates, we derive local versions of factor analysis regression, principle component regression, principle component regression on joint distributions, and partial least squares regression. After outlining the statistical bases of these methods, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate their robustness with respect to violations of their statistical assumptions. One surprising outcome is that locally weighted partial least squares regression offers the best average results, thus outperforming even factor analysis, the theoretically most appealing of our candidate techniques.Ê

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Manufacturing of two and three-dimensional micro/nanostructures by integrating optical tweezers with chemical assembly

Castelino, K., Satyanarayana, S., Sitti, M.

In Nanotechnology, 2003. IEEE-NANO 2003. 2003 Third IEEE Conference on, 1, pages: 56-59, 2003 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Grain boundary faceting phase transition and thermal grooving in Cu

Straumal, B. B., Polyakov, S. A., Bischoff, E., Mittemeijer, E. J., Gust, W.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Diffusion, Segregation and Stresses in Materials, 216/217, pages: 93-100, Diffusion and Defect Data, Pt. A, Defect and Diffusion Forum, Scitec Publ., Moscow, 2003 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Evolution of Fault-tolerant Self-replicating Structures

Righetti, L., Shokur, S., Capcarre, M.

In Advances in Artificial Life, pages: 278-288, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Designed and evolved self-replicating structures in cellular automata have been extensively studied in the past as models of Artificial Life. However, CAs, unlike their biological counterpart, are very brittle: any faulty cell usually leads to the complete destruction of any emerging structures, let alone self-replicating structures. A way to design fault-tolerant structures based on error-correcting-code has been presented recently [1], but it required a cumbersome work to be put into practice. In this paper, we get back to the original inspiration for these works, nature, and propose a way to evolve self-replicating structures, faults here being only an idiosyncracy of the environment.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Learning from demonstration and adaptation of biped locomotion with dynamical movement primitives

Nakanishi, J., Morimoto, J., Endo, G., Schaal, S., Kawato, M.

In Workshop on Robot Learning by Demonstration, IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2003), Las Vegas, NV, Oct. 27-31, 2003, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we report on our research for learning biped locomotion from human demonstration. Our ultimate goal is to establish a design principle of a controller in order to achieve natural human-like locomotion. We suggest dynamical movement primitives as a CPG of a biped robot, an approach we have previously proposed for learning and encoding complex human movements. Demonstrated trajectories are learned through the movement primitives by locally weighted regression, and the frequency of the learned trajectories is adjusted automatically by a novel frequency adaptation algorithm based on phase resetting and entrainment of oscillators. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed locomotion controller.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Movement planning and imitation by shaping nonlinear attractors

Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the 12th Yale Workshop on Adaptive and Learning Systems, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 2003, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Given the continuous stream of movements that biological systems exhibit in their daily activities, an account for such versatility and creativity has to assume that movement sequences consist of segments, executed either in sequence or with partial or complete overlap. Therefore, a fundamental question that has pervaded research in motor control both in artificial and biological systems revolves around identifying movement primitives (a.k.a. units of actions, basis behaviors, motor schemas, etc.). What are the fundamental building blocks that are strung together, adapted to, and created for ever new behaviors? This paper summarizes results that led to the hypothesis of Dynamic Movement Primitives (DMP). DMPs are units of action that are formalized as stable nonlinear attractor systems. They are useful for autonomous robotics as they are highly flexible in creating complex rhythmic (e.g., locomotion) and discrete (e.g., a tennis swing) behaviors that can quickly be adapted to the inevitable perturbations of a dy-namically changing, stochastic environment. Moreover, DMPs provide a formal framework that also lends itself to investigations in computational neuroscience. A recent finding that allows creating DMPs with the help of well-understood statistical learning methods has elevated DMPs from a more heuristic to a principled modeling approach, and, moreover, created a new foundation for imitation learning. Theoretical insights, evaluations on a humanoid robot, and behavioral and brain imaging data will serve to outline the framework of DMPs for a general approach to motor control and imitation in robotics and biology.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Synthetic gecko foot-hair micro/nano-structures for future wall-climbing robots

Sitti, M., Fearing, R. S.

In Robotics and Automation, 2003. Proceedings. ICRA’03. IEEE International Conference on, 1, pages: 1164-1170, 2003 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Grain boundary faceting phase transition and thermal grooving in Cu

Straumal, B. B., Polyakov, S. A., Bischoff, E., Mittemeijer, E. J., Gust, W.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Diffusion, Segregation and Stresses in Materials, 216/217, pages: 93-100, Diffusion and Defect Data, Pt. A, Defect and Diffusion Forum, Scitec Publ., Moscow, 2003 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Biomimetic propulsion for a swimming surgical micro-robot

Edd, J., Payen, S., Rubinsky, B., Stoller, M. L., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2003.(IROS 2003). Proceedings. 2003 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, 3, pages: 2583-2588, 2003 (inproceedings)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Coercivity mechanism in nanocrystalline and bonded magnets

Goll, D., Kronmüller, H.

In Bonded Magnets. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Science and Technology of Bonded Magnets, 118, pages: 115-127, NATO Science Series: Series 2, Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, Kluwer Acad. Publ., Newark, USA, 2003 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Investigation of Electromigration in Copper Interconnects by Noise Measurements

Emelianov, V., Ganesan, G., Puzic, A., Schulz, S., Eizenberg, M., Habermeier, H., Stoll, H.

In Noise as a Tool for Studying Materials, pages: 271-281, Proceedings of SPIE, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 2003 (inproceedings)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Attractive people: Assembling loose-limbed models using non-parametric belief propagation

Sigal, L., Isard, M. I., Sigelman, B. H., Black, M. J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, NIPS, pages: 1539-1546, (Editors: S. Thrun and L. K. Saul and B. Schölkopf), MIT Press, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The detection and pose estimation of people in images and video is made challenging by the variability of human appearance, the complexity of natural scenes, and the high dimensionality of articulated body models. To cope with these problems we represent the 3D human body as a graphical model in which the relationships between the body parts are represented by conditional probability distributions. We formulate the pose estimation problem as one of probabilistic inference over a graphical model where the random variables correspond to the individual limb parameters (position and orientation). Because the limbs are described by 6-dimensional vectors encoding pose in 3-space, discretization is impractical and the random variables in our model must be continuous-valued. To approximate belief propagation in such a graph we exploit a recently introduced generalization of the particle filter. This framework facilitates the automatic initialization of the body-model from low level cues and is robust to occlusion of body parts and scene clutter.

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pdf (color) pdf (black and white) [BibTex]

pdf (color) pdf (black and white) [BibTex]


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Neural decoding of cursor motion using a Kalman filter

(Nominated: Best student paper)

Wu, W., Black, M. J., Gao, Y., Bienenstock, E., Serruya, M., Shaikhouni, A., Donoghue, J. P.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 133-140, MIT Press, 2003 (inproceedings)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]