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2008


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Impact of irradiation-induced point defects on electronically and ionically induced magnetic relaxation mechanisms in titano-magnetites

Walz, F., Brabers, V. A. M., Kronmüller, H.

{Physica Status Solidi (A)}, 205(12):2934-2942, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

2008


DOI [BibTex]


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Polarization selective magnetic vortex dynamics and core reversal in rotating magnetic fields

Curcic, M., van Waeyenberge, B., Vansteenkiste, A., Weigand, M., Sackmann, V., Stoll, H., Fähnle, M., Tyliszczak, T., Woltersdorf, G., Back, C. H., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review Letters}, 101, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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X-ray spectroscopic investigations of Zn0.94Co0.06O thin films

Mayer, G., Fonin, M., Voss, S., Rüdiger, U., Goering, E.

{IEEE Transactions on Magnetics}, 44(11):2700-2703, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Experimental realization of graded L10-FePt/Fe composite media with perpendicular magnetization

Goll, D., Breitling, A., Gu, L., van Aken, P. A., Sigle, W.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 104, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Hard magnetic L10 FePt thin films and nanopatterns

Breitling, A., Goll, D.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 320, pages: 1449-1456, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ma\ssgeschneiderte Speichermaterialien

Hirscher, M.

In Von Brennstoffzellen bis Leuchtdioden (Energie und Chemie - Ein Bündnis für die Zukunft), pages: 31-33, Deutsche Bunsen-Gesellschaft für Physikalische Chemie e.V., Frankfurt am Main, 2008 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Spin-reorientation transition in Co/Pt multilayers on nanospheres

Eimüller, T., Ulbrich, T. C., Amaladass, E., Guhr, I. L., Tyliszczak, T., Albrecht, M.

{Physical Review B}, 77, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Non-destructive compositional analysis of historic organ reed pipes

Manescu, A., Fiori, F., Giuliani, A., Kardjilov, N., Kasztovszky, Z., Rustichelli, F., Straumal, B.

{Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter}, 20, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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An advanced magnetic reflectometer

Brück, S., Bauknecht, S., Ludescher, B., Goering, E., Schütz, G.

{Review of Scientific Instruments}, 79, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Computational model for movement learning under uncertain cost

Theodorou, E., Hoffmann, H., Mistry, M., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of the Society of Neuroscience Meeting (SFN 2008), Washington, DC 2008, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Stochastic optimal control is a framework for computing control commands that lead to an optimal behavior under a given cost. Despite the long history of optimal control in engineering, it has been only recently applied to describe human motion. So far, stochastic optimal control has been mainly used in tasks that are already learned, such as reaching to a target. For learning, however, there are only few cases where optimal control has been applied. The main assumptions of stochastic optimal control that restrict its application to tasks after learning are the a priori knowledge of (1) a quadratic cost function (2) a state space model that captures the kinematics and/or dynamics of musculoskeletal system and (3) a measurement equation that models the proprioceptive and/or exteroceptive feedback. Under these assumptions, a sequence of control gains is computed that is optimal with respect to the prespecified cost function. In our work, we relax the assumption of the a priori known cost function and provide a computational framework for modeling tasks that involve learning. Typically, a cost function consists of two parts: one part that models the task constraints, like squared distance to goal at movement endpoint, and one part that integrates over the squared control commands. In learning a task, the first part of this cost function will be adapted. We use an expectation-maximization scheme for learning: the expectation step optimizes the task constraints through gradient descent of a reward function and the maximizing step optimizes the control commands. Our computational model is tested and compared with data given from a behavioral experiment. In this experiment, subjects sit in front of a drawing tablet and look at a screen onto which the drawing-pen's position is projected. Beginning from a start point, their task is to move with the pen through a target point presented on screen. Visual feedback about the pen's position is given only before movement onset. At the end of a movement, subjects get visual feedback only about the cost of this trial. In the mapping of the pen's position onto the screen, we added a bias (unknown to subject) and Gaussian noise. Therefore the cost is a function of this bias. The subjects were asked to reach to the target and minimize this cost over trials. In this behavioral experiment, subjects could learn the bias and thus showed reinforcement learning. With our computational model, we could model the learning process over trials. Particularly, the dependence on parameters of the reward function (Gaussian width) and the modulation of movement variance over time were similar in experiment and model.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Optimization strategies in human reinforcement learning

Hoffmann, H., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

Advances in Computational Motor Control VII, Symposium at the Society for Neuroscience Meeting, Washington DC, 2008, 2008, clmc (article)

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A Bayesian approach to empirical local linearizations for robotics

Ting, J., D’Souza, A., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2008), Pasadena, CA, USA, May 19-23, 2008, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Local linearizations are ubiquitous in the control of robotic systems. Analytical methods, if available, can be used to obtain the linearization, but in complex robotics systems where the the dynamics and kinematics are often not faithfully obtainable, empirical linearization may be preferable. In this case, it is important to only use data for the local linearization that lies within a ``reasonable'' linear regime of the system, which can be defined from the Hessian at the point of the linearization -- a quantity that is not available without an analytical model. We introduce a Bayesian approach to solve statistically what constitutes a ``reasonable'' local regime. We approach this problem in the context local linear regression. In contrast to previous locally linear methods, we avoid cross-validation or complex statistical hypothesis testing techniques to find the appropriate local regime. Instead, we treat the parameters of the local regime probabilistically and use approximate Bayesian inference for their estimation. This approach results in an analytical set of iterative update equations that are easily implemented on real robotics systems for real-time applications. As in other locally weighted regressions, our algorithm also lends itself to complete nonlinear function approximation for learning empirical internal models. We sketch the derivation of our Bayesian method and provide evaluations on synthetic data and actual robot data where the analytical linearization was known.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Do humans plan continuous trajectories in kinematic coordinates?

Hoffmann, H., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of the Society of Neuroscience Meeting (SFN 2008), Washington, DC 2008, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
The planning and execution of human arm movements is still unresolved. An ongoing controversy is whether we plan a movement in kinematic coordinates and convert these coordinates with an inverse internal model into motor commands (like muscle activation) or whether we combine a few muscle synergies or equilibrium points to move a hand, e.g., between two targets. The first hypothesis implies that a planner produces a desired end-effector position for all time points; the second relies on the dynamics of the muscular-skeletal system for a given control command to produce a continuous end-effector trajectory. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we use a visuomotor adaptation experiment. Subjects moved a pen on a graphics tablet and observed the pen's mapped position onto a screen (subjects quickly adapted to this mapping). The task was to move a cursor between two points in a given time window. In the adaptation test, we manipulated the velocity profile of the cursor feedback such that the shape of the trajectories remained unchanged (for straight paths). If humans would use a kinematic plan and map at each time the desired end-effector position onto control commands, subjects should adapt to the above manipulation. In a similar experiment, Wolpert et al (1995) showed adaptation to changes in the curvature of trajectories. This result, however, cannot rule out a shift of an equilibrium point or an additional synergy activation between start and end point of a movement. In our experiment, subjects did two sessions, one control without and one with velocity-profile manipulation. To skew the velocity profile of the cursor trajectory, we added to the current velocity, v, the function 0.8*v*cos(pi + pi*x), where x is the projection of the cursor position onto the start-goal line divided by the distance start to goal (x=0 at the start point). As result, subjects did not adapt to this manipulation: for all subjects, the true hand motion was not significantly modified in a direction consistent with adaptation, despite that the visually presented motion differed significantly from the control motion. One may still argue that this difference in motion was insufficient to be processed visually. Thus, as a control experiment, we replayed control and modified motions to the subjects and asked which of the two motions appeared 'more natural'. Subjects chose the unperturbed motion as more natural significantly better than chance. In summary, for a visuomotor transformation task, the hypothesis of a planned continuous end-effector trajectory predicts adaptation to a modified velocity profile. The current experiment found no adaptation under such transformation.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design and Numerical Modeling of an On-Board Chemical Release Module for Motion Control of Bacteria-Propelled Swimming Micro-Robots

Behkam, B., Nain, A. S., Amon, C. H., Sitti, M.

In ASME 2008 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, pages: 239-244, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dynamic modeling of stick slip motion in an untethered magnetic microrobot

Pawashe, C., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

Proceedings of Robotics: Science and Systems IV, Zurich, Switzerland, 2008 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Investigation of Calcium Mechanotransduction by Quasi 3-D Microfiber Mechanical Stimulation of Cells

Ruder, W. C., Pratt, E. D., Sitti, M., LeDuc, P. R., Antaki, J. F.

In ASME 2008 Summer Bioengineering Conference, pages: 1049-1050, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Beanbag robotics: Robotic swarms with 1-dof units

Kriesel, D. M., Cheung, E., Sitti, M., Lipson, H.

In International Conference on Ant Colony Optimization and Swarm Intelligence, pages: 267-274, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Particle image velocimetry and thrust of flagellar micro propulsion systems

Danis, U., Sitti, M., Pekkan, K.

In APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting Abstracts, 1, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Frequency analysis with coupled nonlinear oscillators

Buchli, J., Righetti, L., Ijspeert, A.

Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, 237(13):1705-1718, August 2008 (article)

Abstract
We present a method to obtain the frequency spectrum of a signal with a nonlinear dynamical system. The dynamical system is composed of a pool of adaptive frequency oscillators with negative mean-field coupling. For the frequency analysis, the synchronization and adaptation properties of the component oscillators are exploited. The frequency spectrum of the signal is reflected in the statistics of the intrinsic frequencies of the oscillators. The frequency analysis is completely embedded in the dynamics of the system. Thus, no pre-processing or additional parameters, such as time windows, are needed. Representative results of the numerical integration of the system are presented. It is shown, that the oscillators tune to the correct frequencies for both discrete and continuous spectra. Due to its dynamic nature the system is also capable to track non-stationary spectra. Further, we show that the system can be modeled in a probabilistic manner by means of a nonlinear Fokker–Planck equation. The probabilistic treatment is in good agreement with the numerical results, and provides a useful tool to understand the underlying mechanisms leading to convergence.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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A modular bio-inspired architecture for movement generation for the infant-like robot iCub

Degallier, S., Righetti, L., Natale, L., Nori, F., Metta, G., Ijspeert, A.

In 2008 2nd IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, pages: 795-800, IEEE, Scottsdale, USA, October 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Movement generation in humans appears to be processed through a three-layered architecture, where each layer corresponds to a different level of abstraction in the representation of the movement. In this article, we will present an architecture reflecting this organization and based on a modular approach to human movement generation. We will show that our architecture is well suited for the online generation and modulation of motor behaviors, but also for switching between motor behaviors. This will be illustrated respectively through an interactive drumming task and through switching between reaching and crawling.

mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Röntgenzirkulardichroische Untersuchungen XMCD an FePt und Ferrit Nanopartikeln

Nolle, D.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2008 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Nanostructured biointerfaces for investigating cellular adhesion and differentiation

Gojak, C.

Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2008 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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In situ observation of cracks in gold nano-interconnects on flexible substrates

Olliges, S., Gruber, P. A., Orso, S., Auzelyte, V., Ekinci, Y., Solak, H. H., Spolenak, R.

{Scripta Materialia}, 58(3):175-178, 2008 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Transmission electron microscopy study of the intermixing of Fe-Pt multilayers

Kaiser, T., Sigle, W., Goll, D., Goo, N. H., Srot, V., van Aken, P. A., Detemple, E., Jäger, W.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 103, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Spin state and orbita moments across the metal-insulator-transition of REBaCo2O5.5 investigated by XMCD

Lafkioti, M., Goering, E., Gold, S., Schütz, G., Barilo, S. N., Shiryaev, S. V., Bychkov, G. L., Lemmens, P., Hinkov, V., Deisenhofer, J., Loidl, A.

{New Journal of Physics}, 10, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A crucial role for primary cilia in cortical morphogenesis

Willaredt, M. A., Hasenpusch-Theil, K., Gardner, H. A. R., Kitanovic, I., Hirschfeld-Warneken, V. C., Gojak, C. P., Gorgas, K., Bradford, C. L., Spatz, J. P., Wölfl, S., Theil, T., Tucker, K. L.

{The Journal of Neuroscience}, 28(48):12887-12900, 2008 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Exchange coupled composite layers for magnetic recording

Goll, D., Macke, S., Kronmüller, H.

{Physica B}, 403, pages: 338-341, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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XMCD studies on Co and Li doped ZnO magnetic semiconductors

Tietze, T., Gacic, M., Schütz, G., Jakob, G., Brück, S., Goering, E.

{New Journal of Physics}, 10, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Desorption studies of hydrogen in metal-organic frameworks

Panella, B., Hönes, K., Müller, U., Trukhan, N., Schubert, M., Pütter, H., Hirscher, M.

{Angewandte Chemie International Edition}, 47, pages: 2138-2142, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Wetting transition of grain-boundary triple junctions

Straumal, B. B., Kogtenkova, O., Zieba, P.

{Acta Materialia}, 56, pages: 925-933, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Time-resolved X-ray microscopy of spin-torque-induced magnetic vortex gyration

Bolte, M., Meier, G., Krüger, B., Drews, A., Eiselt, R., Bocklage, L., Bohlens, S., Tyliszczak, T., Vansteenkiste, A., Van Waeyenberge, B., Chou, K. W., Puzic, A., Stoll, H.

{Physical Review Letters}, 100, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Study of the intermixing of Fe\textendashPt multilayers by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

Sigle, W., Kaiser, T., Goll, D., Goo, N. H., Srot, V., van Aken, P. A., Detemple, E., Jäger, W.

In EMC2008, 14th European Microscopy Congress, Vol. 2: Materials Science, pages: 109-110, Springer, Aachen, Germany, 2008 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The Gilbert equation revisited: anisotropic and nonlocal damping of magnetization dynamics

Fähnle, M., Steiauf, D., Seib, J.

{Journal of Physics D}, 41, 2008 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

1993


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Learning passive motor control strategies with genetic algorithms

Schaal, S., Sternad, D.

In 1992 Lectures in complex systems, pages: 913-918, (Editors: Nadel, L.;Stein, D.), Addison-Wesley, Redwood City, CA, 1993, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
This study investigates learning passive motor control strategies. Passive control is understood as control without active error correction; the movement is stabilized by particular properties of the controlling dynamics. We analyze the task of juggling a ball on a racket. An approximation to the optimal solution of the task is derived by means of optimization theory. In order to model the learning process, the problem is coded for a genetic algorithm in representations without sensory or with sensory information. For all representations the genetic algorithm is able to find passive control strategies, but learning speed and the quality of the outcome are significantly different. A comparison with data from human subjects shows that humans seem to apply yet different movement strategies to the ones proposed. For the feedback representation some implications arise for learning from demonstration.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

1993


link (url) [BibTex]


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A genetic algorithm for evolution from an ecological perspective

Sternad, D., Schaal, S.

In 1992 Lectures in Complex Systems, pages: 223-231, (Editors: Nadel, L.;Stein, D.), Addison-Wesley, Redwood City, CA, 1993, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
In the population model presented, an evolutionary dynamic is explored which is based on the operator characteristics of genetic algorithms. An essential modification in the genetic algorithms is the inclusion of a constraint in the mixing of the gene pool. The pairing for the crossover is governed by a selection principle based on a complementarity criterion derived from the theoretical tenet of perception-action (P-A) mutuality of ecological psychology. According to Swenson and Turvey [37] P-A mutuality underlies evolution and is an integral part of its thermodynamics. The present simulation tested the contribution of P-A-cycles in evolutionary dynamics. A numerical experiment compares the population's evolution with and without this intentional component. The effect is measured in the difference of the rate of energy dissipation, as well as in three operationalized aspects of complexity. The results support the predicted increase in the rate of energy dissipation, paralleled by an increase in the average heterogeneity of the population. Furthermore, the spatio-temporal evolution of the system is tested for the characteristic power-law relations of a nonlinear system poised in a critical state. The frequency distribution of consecutive increases in population size shows a significantly different exponent in functional relationship.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Roles for memory-based learning in robotics

Atkeson, C. G., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Robotics Research, pages: 503-521, Hidden Valley, PA, 1993, clmc (inproceedings)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design concurrent calculation: A CAD- and data-integrated approach

Schaal, S., Ehrlenspiel, K.

Journal of Engineering Design, 4, pages: 71-85, 1993, clmc (article)

Abstract
Besides functional regards, product design demands increasingly more for further reaching considerations. Quality alone cannot suffice anymore to compete in the market; design for manufacturability, for assembly, for recycling, etc., are well-known keywords. Those can largely be reduced to the necessity of design for costs. This paper focuses on a CAD-based approach to design concurrent calculation. It will discuss how, in the meantime well-established, tools like feature technology, knowledge-based systems, and relational databases can be blended into one coherent concept to achieve an entirely CAD- and data-integrated cost information tool. This system is able to extract data from the CAD-system, combine it with data about the company specific manufacturing environment, and subsequently autonomously evaluate manufacturability aspects and costs of the given CAD-model. Within minutes the designer gets quantitative in-formation about the major cost sources of his/her design. Additionally, some alternative methods for approximating manu-facturing times from empirical data, namely neural networks and local weighted regression, are introduced.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Open loop stable control strategies for robot juggling

Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 3, pages: 913-918, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, Georgia, Atlanta, May 2-6, 1993, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
In a series of case studies out of the field of dynamic manipulation (Mason, 1992), different principles for open loop stable control are introduced and analyzed. This investigation may provide some insight into how open loop control can serve as a useful foundation for closed loop control and, particularly, what to focus on in learning control. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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In vivo diabetic wound healing with nanofibrous scaffolds modified with gentamicin and recombinant human epidermal growth factor

Dwivedi, C., Pandey, I., Pandey, H., Patil, S., Mishra, S. B., Pandey, A. C., Zamboni, P., Ramteke, P. W., Singh, A. V.

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 106(3):641-651, March (article)

Abstract
Abstract Diabetic wounds are susceptible to microbial infection. The treatment of these wounds requires a higher payload of growth factors. With this in mind, the strategy for this study was to utilize a novel payload comprising of Eudragit RL/RS 100 nanofibers carrying the bacterial inhibitor gentamicin sulfate (GS) in concert with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF); an accelerator of wound healing. GS containing Eudragit was electrospun to yield nanofiber scaffolds, which were further modified by covalent immobilization of rhEGF to their surface. This novel fabricated nanoscaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X‐ray diffraction. The thermal behavior of the nanoscaffold was determined using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. In the in vitro antibacterial assays, the nanoscaffolds exhibited comparable antibacterial activity to pure gentemicin powder. In vivo work using female C57/BL6 mice, the nanoscaffolds induced faster wound healing activity in dorsal wounds compared to the control. The paradigm in this study presents a robust in vivo model to enhance the applicability of drug delivery systems in wound healing applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 641–651, 2018.

pi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl gpcr cons
Classified Regression for Bayesian Optimization: Robot Learning with Unknown Penalties

Marco, A., Baumann, D., Hennig, P., Trimpe, S.

Submitted to Journal (under review) (article)

Abstract
Learning robot controllers by minimizing a black-box objective cost using Bayesian optimization (BO) can be time-consuming and challenging. It is very often the case that some roll-outs result in failure behaviors, causing premature experiment detention. In such cases, the designer is forced to decide on heuristic cost penalties because the acquired data is often scarce, or not comparable with that of the stable policies. To overcome this, we propose a Bayesian model that captures exactly what we know about the cost of unstable controllers prior to data collection: Nothing, except that it should be a somewhat large number. The resulting Bayesian model, approximated with a Gaussian process, predicts high cost values in regions where failures are likely to occur. In this way, the model guides the BO exploration toward regions of stability. We demonstrate the benefits of the proposed model in several illustrative and statistical synthetic benchmarks, and also in experiments on a real robotic platform. In addition, we propose and experimentally validate a new BO method to account for unknown constraints. Such method is an extension of Max-Value Entropy Search, a recent information-theoretic method, to solve unconstrained global optimization problems.

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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test jon
(book)

[BibTex]


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test
(article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Geometric Image Synthesis

Alhaija, H. A., Mustikovela, S. K., Geiger, A., Rother, C.

(conference)

avg

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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textes
(article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robotics Research

Tong, Chi Hay, Furgale, Paul, Barfoot, Timothy D, Guizilini, Vitor, Ramos, Fabio, Chen, Yushan, T\uumová, Jana, Ulusoy, Alphan, Belta, Calin, Tenorth, Moritz, others

(article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]