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2010


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Stochastic Differential Dynamic Programming

Theodorou, E., Tassa, Y., Todorov, E.

In the proceedings of American Control Conference (ACC 2010) , 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
We present a generalization of the classic Differential Dynamic Programming algorithm. We assume the existence of state- and control-dependent process noise, and proceed to derive the second-order expansion of the cost-to-go. Despite having quartic and cubic terms in the initial expression, we show that these vanish, leaving us with the same quadratic structure as standard DDP.

am

PDF [BibTex]

2010


PDF [BibTex]


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Enhanced wet adhesion and shear of elastomeric micro-fiber arrays with mushroom tip geometry and a photopolymerized p (DMA-co-MEA) tip coating

Glass, P., Chung, H., Washburn, N. R., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 26(22):17357-17362, American Chemical Society, 2010 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Lateral transport of thermal capillary waves

Smith, T. H. R., Vasilyev, O., Maciolek, A., Schmidt, M.

{Europhysics Letters}, 89(1), 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The formation and propagation of flux avalanches in tailored MgB2 films

Treiber, S., Albrecht, J.

{New Journal of Physics}, 12, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Direct imaging of current induced magnetic vortex gyration in an asymmetric potential well

Bisig, A., Rhensius, J., Kammerer, M., Curcic, M., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Van Waeyenberge, B., Chou, K. W., Tyliszczak, T., Heyderman, L. J., Krzyk, S., von Bieren, A., Kläui, M.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 96, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Induced magnetism of carbon atoms at the graphene/Ni(111) interface

Weser, M., Rehder, Y., Horn, K., Sicot, M., Fonin, M., Preobrajenski, A. B., Voloshina, E. N., Goering, E., Dedkov, Y. S.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 96, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Photon counting system for time-resolved experiments in multibunch mode

Puzic, A., Korhonen, T., Kalantari, B., Raabe, J., Quitmann, C., Jüllig, P., Bommer, L., Goll, D., Schütz, G., Wintz, S., Strache, T., Körner, M., Markó, D., Bunce, C., Fassbender, J.

{Synchrotron Radiation News}, 23(2):26-32, 2010 (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Coupling of Fe and uncompensated Mn moments in exchange-biased Fe/MnPd

Brück, S., Macke, S., Goering, E., Ji, X., Zhan, Q., Krishnan, K. M.

{Physical Review B}, 81(13), 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Remarks about spillover and hydrogen adsorption - Comments on the contributions of A.V. Talyzin and R.T. Yang

Hirscher, M.

{Microporous and Mesoporous Materials}, 135, pages: 209-210, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]


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Grain boundary ridges and triple lines

Straumal, B. B., Sursaeva, V. G., Baretzky, B.

{Scripta Materialia}, 62(12):924-927, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Expanding micelle nanolithography to the self-assembly of multicomponent core-shell nanoparticles

Mbenkum, B. N., D\’\iaz-Ortiz, A., Gu, L., van Aken, P. A., Schütz, G.

{Journal of the American Chemical Society}, 132(31):10671-10673, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Learning control in robotics – trajectory-based opitimal control techniques

Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G.

Robotics and Automation Magazine, 17(2):20-29, 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
In a not too distant future, robots will be a natural part of daily life in human society, providing assistance in many areas ranging from clinical applications, education and care giving, to normal household environments [1]. It is hard to imagine that all possible tasks can be preprogrammed in such robots. Robots need to be able to learn, either by themselves or with the help of human supervision. Additionally, wear and tear on robots in daily use needs to be automatically compensated for, which requires a form of continuous self-calibration, another form of learning. Finally, robots need to react to stochastic and dynamic environments, i.e., they need to learn how to optimally adapt to uncertainty and unforeseen changes. Robot learning is going to be a key ingredient for the future of autonomous robots. While robot learning covers a rather large field, from learning to perceive, to plan, to make decisions, etc., we will focus this review on topics of learning control, in particular, as it is concerned with learning control in simulated or actual physical robots. In general, learning control refers to the process of acquiring a control strategy for a particular control system and a particular task by trial and error. Learning control is usually distinguished from adaptive control [2] in that the learning system can have rather general optimization objectivesâ??not just, e.g., minimal tracking errorâ??and is permitted to fail during the process of learning, while adaptive control emphasizes fast convergence without failure. Thus, learning control resembles the way that humans and animals acquire new movement strategies, while adaptive control is a special case of learning control that fulfills stringent performance constraints, e.g., as needed in life-critical systems like airplanes. Learning control has been an active topic of research for at least three decades. However, given the lack of working robots that actually use learning components, more work needs to be done before robot learning will make it beyond the laboratory environment. This article will survey some ongoing and past activities in robot learning to assess where the field stands and where it is going. We will largely focus on nonwheeled robots and less on topics of state estimation, as typically explored in wheeled robots [3]â??6], and we emphasize learning in continuous state-action spaces rather than discrete state-action spaces [7], [8]. We will illustrate the different topics of robot learning with examples from our own research with anthropomorphic and humanoid robots.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning, planning, and control for quadruped locomotion over challenging terrain

Kalakrishnan, M., Buchli, J., Pastor, P., Mistry, M., Schaal, S.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 30(2):236-258, 2010, clmc (article)

Abstract
We present a control architecture for fast quadruped locomotion over rough terrain. We approach the problem by decomposing it into many sub-systems, in which we apply state-of-the-art learning, planning, optimization, and control techniques to achieve robust, fast locomotion. Unique features of our control strategy include: (1) a system that learns optimal foothold choices from expert demonstration using terrain templates, (2) a body trajectory optimizer based on the Zero- Moment Point (ZMP) stability criterion, and (3) a floating-base inverse dynamics controller that, in conjunction with force control, allows for robust, compliant locomotion over unperceived obstacles. We evaluate the performance of our controller by testing it on the LittleDog quadruped robot, over a wide variety of rough terrains of varying difficulty levels. The terrain that the robot was tested on includes rocks, logs, steps, barriers, and gaps, with obstacle sizes up to the leg length of the robot. We demonstrate the generalization ability of this controller by presenting results from testing performed by an independent external test team on terrain that has never been shown to us.

am

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Teleoperated 3-D force feedback from the nanoscale with an atomic force microscope

Onal, C. D., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on nanotechnology, 9(1):46-54, IEEE, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Roll and pitch motion analysis of a biologically inspired quadruped water runner robot

Park, H. S., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 29(10):1281-1297, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microstructured elastomeric surfaces with reversible adhesion and examples of their use in deterministic assembly by transfer printing

Kim, Seok, Wu, Jian, Carlson, Andrew, Jin, Sung Hun, Kovalsky, Anton, Glass, Paul, Liu, Zhuangjian, Ahmed, Numair, Elgan, Steven L, Chen, Weiqiu, others

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(40):17095-17100, National Acad Sciences, 2010 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Tankbot: A palm-size, tank-like climbing robot using soft elastomer adhesive treads

Unver, O., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 29(14):1761-1777, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hydrogen spillover measurements of unbridged and bridged metal-organic frameworks - revisited

Campesi, R., Cuevas, F., Latroche, M., Hirscher, M.

{Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics}, 12, pages: 10457-10459, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Relating Gilbert damping and ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization

Fähnle, M., Seib, J., Illg, C.

{Physical Review B}, 82, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ferromagnetic properties of the Mn-doped nanograined ZnO films

Straumal, B. B., Protasova, S. G., Mazilkin, A. A., Myatiev, A. A., Straumal, P. B., Schütz, G., Goering, E., Baretzky, B.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 108, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ubiquity of ferromagnetic signals in common diamagnetic oxide crystals

Khalid, M., Setzer, A., Ziese, M., Esquinazi, P., Spemann, D., Pöppl, A., Goering, E.

{Physical Review B}, 81(21), 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Calculation of the Gilbert damping matrix at low scattering rates in Gd

Seib, J., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 82, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Swift heavy ions for controlled modification of soft magnetic properties of Fe0.85N0.15 thin film

Gupta, R., Gupta, A., Bhatt, R., Rüffer, R., Avasthi, D. K.

{Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter}, 22(22), 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Note: Aligned deposition and modal characterization of micron and submicron poly (methyl methacyrlate) fiber cantilevers

Nain, A. S., Filiz, S., Burak Ozdoganlar, O., Sitti, M., Amon, C.

Review of Scientific Instruments, 81(1):016102, AIP, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enhanced adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide elastomers via viscoelasticity tuning

Chung, H., Glass, P., Pothen, J. M., Sitti, M., Washburn, N. R.

Biomacromolecules, 12(2):342-347, American Chemical Society, 2010 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Laterally driven interfaces in the three-dimensional Ising lattice gas

Smith, T. H. R., Vasilyev, O., Maciolek, A., Schmidt, M.

{Physical Review E}, 82(2), 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Samarium-cobalt 2:17 magnets: identifying Smn+1Co5n-1 phases stabilized by Zr

Stadelmaier, H. H., Kronmüller, H., Goll, D.

{Scripta Materialia}, 63, pages: 843-846, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Planar metamaterial analogue of electromagnetically induced transparancy for plasmonic sensing

Liu, N., Weiss, T., Mesch, M., Langguth, L., Eigenthaler, U., Hirscher, M., Sönnichsen, C., Giessen, H.

{Nano Letters}, 10, pages: 1103-1107, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Explaining the paradoxical diversity of ultrafast last-induced demagnetization

Koopmans, B., Malinowski, G., Dalla Longa, F., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M., Roth, T., Cinchetti, M., Aeschlimann, M.

{Nature Materials}, 9, pages: 259-265, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A high heat of adsorption for hydrogen in magnesium formate

Schmitz, B., Krkljus, I., Leung, E., Höffken, H. W., Müller, U., Hirscher, M.

{ChemSusChem}, 3, pages: 758-761, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Force induced destabilization of adhesion complexes at defined integrin spacings on nanostructured surfaces

de Beer, A. G. F., Cavalcanti-Adam, E. A., Majer, G., López-Garc\’\ia, M., Kessler, H., Spatz, J. P.

{Physical Review E}, 81, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Anisotropic damping of the magnetization dynamics in Ni, Co, and Fe

Gilmore, K., Stiles, M. D., Seib, J., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 81, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Influence of [Mo6Br8F6]2- cluster inclusion within the mesoporous solid MIL-101 on hydrogen storage performance

Dybtsev, D., Serre, C., Schmitz, B., Panella, B., Hirscher, M., Latroche, M., Llewellyn, P. L., Cordier, S., Molard, Y., Haouas, M., Taulelle, F., Férey, G.

{Langmuir}, 26(13):11283-11290, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Grain boundary layers in nanocrystalline ferromagnetic zinc oxide

Straumal, B. B., Myatiev, A. A., Straumal, P. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Goering, E., Baretzky, B.

{JETP Letters}, 92(6):396-400, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2006


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Structure validation of the Josephin domain of ataxin-3: Conclusive evidence for an open conformation

Nicastro, G., Habeck, M., Masino, L., Svergun, DI., Pastore, A.

Journal of Biomolecular NMR, 36(4):267-277, December 2006 (article)

Abstract
The availability of new and fast tools in structure determination has led to a more than exponential growth of the number of structures solved per year. It is therefore increasingly essential to assess the accuracy of the new structures by reliable approaches able to assist validation. Here, we discuss a specific example in which the use of different complementary techniques, which include Bayesian methods and small angle scattering, resulted essential for validating the two currently available structures of the Josephin domain of ataxin-3, a protein involved in the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and responsible for neurodegenerative spinocerebellar ataxia of type 3. Taken together, our results demonstrate that only one of the two structures is compatible with the experimental information. Based on the high precision of our refined structure, we show that Josephin contains an open cleft which could be directly implicated in the interaction with polyubiquitin chains and other partners.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2006


Web DOI [BibTex]


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A Unifying View of Wiener and Volterra Theory and Polynomial Kernel Regression

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Computation, 18(12):3097-3118, December 2006 (article)

Abstract
Volterra and Wiener series are perhaps the best understood nonlinear system representations in signal processing. Although both approaches have enjoyed a certain popularity in the past, their application has been limited to rather low-dimensional and weakly nonlinear systems due to the exponential growth of the number of terms that have to be estimated. We show that Volterra and Wiener series can be represented implicitly as elements of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space by utilizing polynomial kernels. The estimation complexity of the implicit representation is linear in the input dimensionality and independent of the degree of nonlinearity. Experiments show performance advantages in terms of convergence, interpretability, and system sizes that can be handled.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Statistical Analysis of Slow Crack Growth Experiments

Pfingsten, T., Glien, K.

Journal of the European Ceramic Society, 26(15):3061-3065, November 2006 (article)

Abstract
A common approach for the determination of Slow Crack Growth (SCG) parameters are the static and dynamic loading method. Since materials with small Weibull module show a large variability in strength, a correct statistical analysis of the data is indispensable. In this work we propose the use of the Maximum Likelihood method and a Baysian analysis, which, in contrast to the standard procedures, take into account that failure strengths are Weibull distributed. The analysis provides estimates for the SCG parameters, the Weibull module, and the corresponding confidence intervals and overcomes the necessity of manual differentiation between inert and fatigue strength data. We compare the methods to a Least Squares approach, which can be considered the standard procedure. The results for dynamic loading data from the glass sealing of MEMS devices show that the assumptions inherent to the standard approach lead to significantly different estimates.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Mining frequent stem patterns from unaligned RNA sequences

Hamada, M., Tsuda, K., Kudo, T., Kin, T., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 22(20):2480-2487, October 2006 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: In detection of non-coding RNAs, it is often necessary to identify the secondary structure motifs from a set of putative RNA sequences. Most of the existing algorithms aim to provide the best motif or few good motifs, but biologists often need to inspect all the possible motifs thoroughly. Results: Our method RNAmine employs a graph theoretic representation of RNA sequences, and detects all the possible motifs exhaustively using a graph mining algorithm. The motif detection problem boils down to finding frequently appearing patterns in a set of directed and labeled graphs. In the tasks of common secondary structure prediction and local motif detection from long sequences, our method performed favorably both in accuracy and in efficiency with the state-of-the-art methods such as CMFinder.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Large-Scale Gene Expression Profiling Reveals Major Pathogenetic Pathways of Cartilage Degeneration in Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Fundel, K., Saas, J., Gebhard, P., Haag, J., Weiss, T., Zien, A., Obermayr, F., Zimmer, R., Bartnik, E.

Arthritis and Rheumatism, 54(11):3533-3544, October 2006 (article)

Abstract
Objective. Despite many research efforts in recent decades, the major pathogenetic mechanisms of osteo- arthritis (OA), including gene alterations occurring during OA cartilage degeneration, are poorly under- stood, and there is no disease-modifying treatment approach. The present study was therefore initiated in order to identify differentially expressed disease-related genes and potential therapeutic targets. Methods. This investigation consisted of a large gene expression profiling study performed based on 78 normal and disease samples, using a custom-made complementar y DNA array covering >4,000 genes. Results. Many differentially expressed genes were identified, including the expected up-regulation of ana- bolic and catabolic matrix genes. In particular, the down-regulation of important oxidative defense genes, i.e., the genes for superoxide dismutases 2 and 3 and glutathione peroxidase 3, was prominent. This indicates that continuous oxidative stress to the cells and the matrix is one major underlying pathogenetic mecha- nism in OA. Also, genes that are involved in the phenot ypic stabilit y of cells, a feature that is greatly reduced in OA cartilage, appeared to be suppressed. Conclusion. Our findings provide a reference data set on gene alterations in OA cartilage and, importantly, indicate major mechanisms underlying central cell bio- logic alterations that occur during the OA disease process. These results identify molecular targets that can be further investigated in the search for therapeutic interventions.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Implicit Surface Modelling with a Globally Regularised Basis of Compact Support

Walder, C., Schölkopf, B., Chapelle, O.

Computer Graphics Forum, 25(3):635-644, September 2006 (article)

Abstract
We consider the problem of constructing a globally smooth analytic function that represents a surface implicitly by way of its zero set, given sample points with surface normal vectors. The contributions of the paper include a novel means of regularising multi-scale compactly supported basis functions that leads to the desirable interpolation properties previously only associated with fully supported bases. We also provide a regularisation framework for simpler and more direct treatment of surface normals, along with a corresponding generalisation of the representer theorem lying at the core of kernel-based machine learning methods. We demonstrate the techniques on 3D problems of up to 14 million data points, as well as 4D time series data and four-dimensional interpolation between three-dimensional shapes.

ei

PDF GZIP DOI [BibTex]


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An Online Support Vector Machine for Abnormal Events Detection

Davy, M., Desobry, F., Gretton, A., Doncarli, C.

Signal Processing, 86(8):2009-2025, August 2006 (article)

Abstract
The ability to detect online abnormal events in signals is essential in many real-world Signal Processing applications. Previous algorithms require an explicit signal statistical model, and interpret abnormal events as statistical model abrupt changes. Corresponding implementation relies on maximum likelihood or on Bayes estimation theory with generally excellent performance. However, there are numerous cases where a robust and tractable model cannot be obtained, and model-free approaches need to be considered. In this paper, we investigate a machine learning, descriptor-based approach that does not require an explicit descriptors statistical model, based on Support Vector novelty detection. A sequential optimization algorithm is introduced. Theoretical considerations as well as simulations on real signals demonstrate its practical efficiency.

ei

PDF PostScript PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PostScript PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Integrating Structured Biological data by Kernel Maximum Mean Discrepancy

Borgwardt, K., Gretton, A., Rasch, M., Kriegel, H., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

Bioinformatics, 22(4: ISMB 2006 Conference Proceedings):e49-e57, August 2006 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Many problems in data integration in bioinformatics can be posed as one common question: Are two sets of observations generated by the same distribution? We propose a kernel-based statistical test for this problem, based on the fact that two distributions are different if and only if there exists at least one function having different expectation on the two distributions. Consequently we use the maximum discrepancy between function means as the basis of a test statistic. The Maximum Mean Discrepancy (MMD) can take advantage of the kernel trick, which allows us to apply it not only to vectors, but strings, sequences, graphs, and other common structured data types arising in molecular biology. Results: We study the practical feasibility of an MMD-based test on three central data integration tasks: Testing cross-platform comparability of microarray data, cancer diagnosis, and data-content based schema matching for two different protein function classification schemas. In all of these experiments, including high-dimensional ones, MMD is very accurate in finding samples that were generated from the same distribution, and outperforms its best competitors. Conclusions: We have defined a novel statistical test of whether two samples are from the same distribution, compatible with both multivariate and structured data, that is fast, easy to implement, and works well, as confirmed by our experiments.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Large Scale Transductive SVMs

Collobert, R., Sinz, F., Weston, J., Bottou, L.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 7, pages: 1687-1712, August 2006 (article)

Abstract
We show how the Concave-Convex Procedure can be applied to the optimization of Transductive SVMs, which traditionally requires solving a combinatorial search problem. This provides for the first time a highly scalable algorithm in the nonlinear case. Detailed experiments verify the utility of our approach.

ei

PostScript PDF PDF [BibTex]

PostScript PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Building Support Vector Machines with Reduced Classifier Complexity

Keerthi, S., Chapelle, O., DeCoste, D.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 7, pages: 1493-1515, July 2006 (article)

Abstract
Support vector machines (SVMs), though accurate, are not preferred in applications requiring great classification speed, due to the number of support vectors being large. To overcome this problem we devise a primal method with the following properties: (1) it decouples the idea of basis functions from the concept of support vectors; (2) it greedily finds a set of kernel basis functions of a specified maximum size ($dmax$) to approximate the SVM primal cost function well; (3) it is efficient and roughly scales as $O(ndmax^2)$ where $n$ is the number of training examples; and, (4) the number of basis functions it requires to achieve an accuracy close to the SVM accuracy is usually far less than the number of SVM support vectors.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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ARTS: Accurate Recognition of Transcription Starts in Human

Sonnenburg, S., Zien, A., Rätsch, G.

Bioinformatics, 22(14):e472-e480, July 2006 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: One of the most important features of genomic DNA are the protein-coding genes. While it is of great value to identify those genes and the encoded proteins, it is also crucial to understand how their transcription is regulated. To this end one has to identify the corresponding promoters and the contained transcription factor binding sites. TSS finders can be used to locate potential promoters. They may also be used in combination with other signal and content detectors to resolve entire gene structures. Results: We have developed a novel kernel based method - called ARTS - that accurately recognizes transcription start sites in human. The application of otherwise too computationally expensive Support Vector Machines was made possible due to the use of efficient training and evaluation techniques using suffix tries. In a carefully designed experimental study, we compare our TSS finder to state-of-the-art methods from the literature: McPromoter, Eponine and FirstEF. For given false positive rates within a reasonable range, we consistently achieve considerably higher true positive rates. For instance, ARTS finds about 24% true positives at a false positive rate of 1/1000, where the other methods find less than half (10.5%). Availability: Datasets, model selection results, whole genome predictions, and additional experimental results are available at http://www.fml.tuebingen.mpg.de/raetsch/projects/arts

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Large Scale Multiple Kernel Learning

Sonnenburg, S., Rätsch, G., Schäfer, C., Schölkopf, B.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 7, pages: 1531-1565, July 2006 (article)

Abstract
While classical kernel-based learning algorithms are based on a single kernel, in practice it is often desirable to use multiple kernels. Lanckriet et al. (2004) considered conic combinations of kernel matrices for classification, leading to a convex quadratically constrained quadratic program. We show that it can be rewritten as a semi-infinite linear program that can be efficiently solved by recycling the standard SVM implementations. Moreover, we generalize the formulation and our method to a larger class of problems, including regression and one-class classification. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm works for hundred thousands of examples or hundreds of kernels to be combined, and helps for automatic model selection, improving the interpretability of the learning result. In a second part we discuss general speed up mechanism for SVMs, especially when used with sparse feature maps as appear for string kernels, allowing us to train a string kernel SVM on a 10 million real-world splice data set from computational biology. We integrated multiple kernel learning in our machine learning toolbox SHOGUN for which the source code is publicly available at http://www.fml.tuebingen.mpg.de/raetsch/projects/shogun.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Factorial coding of natural images: how effective are linear models in removing higher-order dependencies?

Bethge, M.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 23(6):1253-1268, June 2006 (article)

Abstract
The performance of unsupervised learning models for natural images is evaluated quantitatively by means of information theory. We estimate the gain in statistical independence (the multi-information reduction) achieved with independent component analysis (ICA), principal component analysis (PCA), zero-phase whitening, and predictive coding. Predictive coding is translated into the transform coding framework, where it can be characterized by the constraint of a triangular filter matrix. A randomly sampled whitening basis and the Haar wavelet are included into the comparison as well. The comparison of all these methods is carried out for different patch sizes, ranging from 2x2 to 16x16 pixels. In spite of large differences in the shape of the basis functions, we find only small differences in the multi-information between all decorrelation transforms (5% or less) for all patch sizes. Among the second-order methods, PCA is optimal for small patch sizes and predictive coding performs best for large patch sizes. The extra gain achieved with ICA is always less than 2%. In conclusion, the `edge filters‘ found with ICA lead only to a surprisingly small improvement in terms of its actual objective.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Classifying EEG and ECoG Signals without Subject Training for Fast BCI Implementation: Comparison of Non-Paralysed and Completely Paralysed Subjects

Hill, N., Lal, T., Schröder, M., Hinterberger, T., Wilhelm, B., Nijboer, F., Mochty, U., Widman, G., Elger, C., Schölkopf, B., Kübler, A., Birbaumer, N.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 14(2):183-186, June 2006 (article)

Abstract
We summarize results from a series of related studies that aim to develop a motor-imagery-based brain-computer interface using a single recording session of EEG or ECoG signals for each subject. We apply the same experimental and analytical methods to 11 non-paralysed subjects (8 EEG, 3 ECoG), and to 5 paralysed subjects (4 EEG, 1 ECoG) who had been unable to communicate for some time. While it was relatively easy to obtain classifiable signals quickly from most of the non-paralysed subjects, it proved impossible to classify the signals obtained from the paralysed patients by the same methods. This highlights the fact that though certain BCI paradigms may work well with healthy subjects, this does not necessarily indicate success with the target user group. We outline possible reasons for this failure to transfer.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]