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2008


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Miniature Mobile Robots Down to Micron Scale

Sitti, M.

In Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science, 2008. MHS 2008. International Symposium on, pages: 525-525, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

2008


[BibTex]


no image
Movement reproduction and obstacle avoidance with dynamic movement primitives and potential fields

Park, D., Hoffmann, H., Pastor, P., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Humanoid Robots, 2008., 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Wetting and premelting of triple junctions and grain boundaries in the Al-Zn alloys

Straumal, B., Kogtenkova, O., Protasova, S., Mazilkin, A., Zieba, P., Czeppe, T., Wojewoda-Budka, J., Faryna, M.

In 495, pages: 126-131, Alicante, Spain, 2008 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The dual role of uncertainty in force field learning

Mistry, M., Theodorou, E., Hoffmann, H., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of the Eighteenth Annual Meeting of Neural Control of Movement (NCM), Naples, Florida, April 29-May 4, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Force field experiments have been a successful paradigm for studying the principles of planning, execution, and learning in human arm movements. Subjects have been shown to cope with the disturbances generated by force fields by learning internal models of the underlying dynamics to predict disturbance effects or by increasing arm impedance (via co-contraction) if a predictive approach becomes infeasible. Several studies have addressed the issue uncertainty in force field learning. Scheidt et al. demonstrated that subjects exposed to a viscous force field of fixed structure but varying strength (randomly changing from trial to trial), learn to adapt to the mean disturbance, regardless of the statistical distribution. Takahashi et al. additionally show a decrease in strength of after-effects after learning in the randomly varying environment. Thus they suggest that the nervous system adopts a dual strategy: learning an internal model of the mean of the random environment, while simultaneously increasing arm impedance to minimize the consequence of errors. In this study, we examine what role variance plays in the learning of uncertain force fields. We use a 7 degree-of-freedom exoskeleton robot as a manipulandum (Sarcos Master Arm, Sarcos, Inc.), and apply a 3D viscous force field of fixed structure and strength randomly selected from trial to trial. Additionally, in separate blocks of trials, we alter the variance of the randomly selected strength multiplier (while keeping a constant mean). In each block, after sufficient learning has occurred, we apply catch trials with no force field and measure the strength of after-effects. As expected in higher variance cases, results show increasingly smaller levels of after-effects as the variance is increased, thus implying subjects choose the robust strategy of increasing arm impedance to cope with higher levels of uncertainty. Interestingly, however, subjects show an increase in after-effect strength with a small amount of variance as compared to the deterministic (zero variance) case. This result implies that a small amount of variability aides in internal model formation, presumably a consequence of the additional amount of exploration conducted in the workspace of the task.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dynamic movement primitives for movement generation motivated by convergent force fields in frog

Hoffmann, H., Pastor, P., Schaal, S.

In Adaptive Motion of Animals and Machines (AMAM), 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Polymeric Micro/Nanofiber Manufacturing and Mechanical Characterization

Nain, A. S., Sitti, M., Amon, C.

In ASME 2008 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, pages: 295-303, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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An untethered magnetically actuated micro-robot capable of motion on arbitrary surfaces

Floyd, S., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2008. ICRA 2008. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 419-424, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Fabrication of bio-inspired elastomer nanofiber arrays with spatulate tips using notching effect

Kim, S., Sitti, M., Jang, J., Thomas, E. L.

In Nanotechnology, 2008. NANO’08. 8th IEEE Conference on, pages: 780-782, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A motorized anchoring mechanism for a tethered capsule robot using fibrillar adhesives for interventions in the esophagus

Glass, P., Cheung, E., Wang, H., Appasamy, R., Sitti, M.

In Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2008. BioRob 2008. 2nd IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on, pages: 758-764, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Emergence of Interaction Among Adaptive Agents

Martius, G., Nolfi, S., Herrmann, J. M.

In Proc. From Animals to Animats 10 (SAB 2008), 5040, pages: 457-466, LNCS, Springer, 2008 (inproceedings)

al

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Dynamical System for Online Learning of Periodic Movements of Unknown Waveform and Frequency

Gams, A., Righetti, L., Ijspeert, A., Lenarčič, J.

In 2008 2nd IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, pages: 85-90, IEEE, Scottsdale, USA, October 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The paper presents a two-layered system for learning and encoding a periodic signal onto a limit cycle without any knowledge on the waveform and the frequency of the signal, and without any signal processing. The first dynamical system is responsible for extracting the main frequency of the input signal. It is based on adaptive frequency phase oscillators in a feedback structure, enabling us to extract separate frequency components without any signal processing, as all of the processing is embedded in the dynamics of the system itself. The second dynamical system is responsible for learning of the waveform. It has a built-in learning algorithm based on locally weighted regression, which adjusts the weights according to the amplitude of the input signal. By combining the output of the first system with the input of the second system we can rapidly teach new trajectories to robots. The systems works online for any periodic signal and can be applied in parallel to multiple dimensions. Furthermore, it can adapt to changes in frequency and shape, e.g. to non-stationary signals, and is computationally inexpensive. Results using simulated and hand-generated input signals, along with applying the algorithm to a HOAP-2 humanoid robot are presented.

mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Passive compliant quadruped robot using central pattern generators for locomotion control

Rutishauser, S., Sproewitz, A., Righetti, L., Ijspeert, A.

In 2008 IEEE International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, pages: 710-715, IEEE, Scottsdale, USA, October 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a new quadruped robot, ldquoCheetahrdquo, featuring three-segment pantographic legs with passive compliant knee joints. Each leg has two degrees of freedom - knee and hip joint can be actuated using proximal mounted RC servo motors, force transmission to the knee is achieved by means of a bowden cable mechanism. Simple electronics to command the actuators from a desktop computer have been designed in order to test the robot. A Central Pattern Generator (CPG) network has been implemented to generate different gaits. A parameter space search was performed and tested on the robot to optimize forward velocity.

mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Behavioral experiments on reinforcement learning in human motor control

Hoffmann, H., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of the Eighteenth Annual Meeting of Neural Control of Movement (NCM), Naples, Florida, April 29-May 4, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Reinforcement learning (RL) - learning solely based on reward or cost feedback - is widespread in robotics control and has been also suggested as computational model for human motor control. In human motor control, however, hardly any experiment studied reinforcement learning. Here, we study learning based on visual cost feedback in a reaching task and did three experiments: (1) to establish a simple enough experiment for RL, (2) to study spatial localization of RL, and (3) to study the dependence of RL on the cost function. In experiment (1), subjects sit in front of a drawing tablet and look at a screen onto which the drawing pen's position is projected. Beginning from a start point, their task is to move with the pen through a target point presented on screen. Visual feedback about the pen's position is given only before movement onset. At the end of a movement, subjects get visual feedback only about the cost of this trial. We choose as cost the squared distance between target and virtual pen position at the target line. Above a threshold value, the cost was fixed at this value. In the mapping of the pen's position onto the screen, we added a bias (unknown to subject) and Gaussian noise. As result, subjects could learn the bias, and thus, showed reinforcement learning. In experiment (2), we randomly altered the target position between three different locations (three different directions from start point: -45, 0, 45). For each direction, we chose a different bias. As result, subjects learned all three bias values simultaneously. Thus, RL can be spatially localized. In experiment (3), we varied the sensitivity of the cost function by multiplying the squared distance with a constant value C, while keeping the same cut-off threshold. As in experiment (2), we had three target locations. We assigned to each location a different C value (this assignment was randomized between subjects). Since subjects learned the three locations simultaneously, we could directly compare the effect of the different cost functions. As result, we found an optimal C value; if C was too small (insensitive cost), learning was slow; if C was too large (narrow cost valley), the exploration time was longer and learning delayed. Thus, reinforcement learning in human motor control appears to be sen

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Movement generation by learning from demonstration and generalization to new targets

Pastor, P., Hoffmann, H., Schaal, S.

In Adaptive Motion of Animals and Machines (AMAM), 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Combining dynamic movement primitives and potential fields for online obstacle avoidance

Park, D., Hoffmann, H., Schaal, S.

In Adaptive Motion of Animals and Machines (AMAM), Cleveland, Ohio, 2008, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Fabrication of Single and Multi-Layer Fibrous Biomaterial Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

Nain, A. S., Miller, E., Sitti, M., Campbell, P., Amon, C.

In ASME 2008 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, pages: 231-238, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Performance of different foot designs for a water running robot

Floyd, S., Adilak, S., Ramirez, S., Rogman, R., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2008. ICRA 2008. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 244-250, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dynamic modeling of a basilisk lizard inspired quadruped robot running on water

Park, H. S., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2008. IROS 2008. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 3101-3107, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bacterial propulsion of chemically patterned micro-cylinders

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

In Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2008. BioRob 2008. 2nd IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on, pages: 753-757, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structure from Behavior in Autonomous Agents

Martius, G., Fiedler, K., Herrmann, J.

In Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2008), pages: 858 - 862, 2008 (inproceedings)

al

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Computational model for movement learning under uncertain cost

Theodorou, E., Hoffmann, H., Mistry, M., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of the Society of Neuroscience Meeting (SFN 2008), Washington, DC 2008, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Stochastic optimal control is a framework for computing control commands that lead to an optimal behavior under a given cost. Despite the long history of optimal control in engineering, it has been only recently applied to describe human motion. So far, stochastic optimal control has been mainly used in tasks that are already learned, such as reaching to a target. For learning, however, there are only few cases where optimal control has been applied. The main assumptions of stochastic optimal control that restrict its application to tasks after learning are the a priori knowledge of (1) a quadratic cost function (2) a state space model that captures the kinematics and/or dynamics of musculoskeletal system and (3) a measurement equation that models the proprioceptive and/or exteroceptive feedback. Under these assumptions, a sequence of control gains is computed that is optimal with respect to the prespecified cost function. In our work, we relax the assumption of the a priori known cost function and provide a computational framework for modeling tasks that involve learning. Typically, a cost function consists of two parts: one part that models the task constraints, like squared distance to goal at movement endpoint, and one part that integrates over the squared control commands. In learning a task, the first part of this cost function will be adapted. We use an expectation-maximization scheme for learning: the expectation step optimizes the task constraints through gradient descent of a reward function and the maximizing step optimizes the control commands. Our computational model is tested and compared with data given from a behavioral experiment. In this experiment, subjects sit in front of a drawing tablet and look at a screen onto which the drawing-pen's position is projected. Beginning from a start point, their task is to move with the pen through a target point presented on screen. Visual feedback about the pen's position is given only before movement onset. At the end of a movement, subjects get visual feedback only about the cost of this trial. In the mapping of the pen's position onto the screen, we added a bias (unknown to subject) and Gaussian noise. Therefore the cost is a function of this bias. The subjects were asked to reach to the target and minimize this cost over trials. In this behavioral experiment, subjects could learn the bias and thus showed reinforcement learning. With our computational model, we could model the learning process over trials. Particularly, the dependence on parameters of the reward function (Gaussian width) and the modulation of movement variance over time were similar in experiment and model.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Bayesian approach to empirical local linearizations for robotics

Ting, J., D’Souza, A., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2008), Pasadena, CA, USA, May 19-23, 2008, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Local linearizations are ubiquitous in the control of robotic systems. Analytical methods, if available, can be used to obtain the linearization, but in complex robotics systems where the the dynamics and kinematics are often not faithfully obtainable, empirical linearization may be preferable. In this case, it is important to only use data for the local linearization that lies within a ``reasonable'' linear regime of the system, which can be defined from the Hessian at the point of the linearization -- a quantity that is not available without an analytical model. We introduce a Bayesian approach to solve statistically what constitutes a ``reasonable'' local regime. We approach this problem in the context local linear regression. In contrast to previous locally linear methods, we avoid cross-validation or complex statistical hypothesis testing techniques to find the appropriate local regime. Instead, we treat the parameters of the local regime probabilistically and use approximate Bayesian inference for their estimation. This approach results in an analytical set of iterative update equations that are easily implemented on real robotics systems for real-time applications. As in other locally weighted regressions, our algorithm also lends itself to complete nonlinear function approximation for learning empirical internal models. We sketch the derivation of our Bayesian method and provide evaluations on synthetic data and actual robot data where the analytical linearization was known.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Do humans plan continuous trajectories in kinematic coordinates?

Hoffmann, H., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of the Society of Neuroscience Meeting (SFN 2008), Washington, DC 2008, 2008, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
The planning and execution of human arm movements is still unresolved. An ongoing controversy is whether we plan a movement in kinematic coordinates and convert these coordinates with an inverse internal model into motor commands (like muscle activation) or whether we combine a few muscle synergies or equilibrium points to move a hand, e.g., between two targets. The first hypothesis implies that a planner produces a desired end-effector position for all time points; the second relies on the dynamics of the muscular-skeletal system for a given control command to produce a continuous end-effector trajectory. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we use a visuomotor adaptation experiment. Subjects moved a pen on a graphics tablet and observed the pen's mapped position onto a screen (subjects quickly adapted to this mapping). The task was to move a cursor between two points in a given time window. In the adaptation test, we manipulated the velocity profile of the cursor feedback such that the shape of the trajectories remained unchanged (for straight paths). If humans would use a kinematic plan and map at each time the desired end-effector position onto control commands, subjects should adapt to the above manipulation. In a similar experiment, Wolpert et al (1995) showed adaptation to changes in the curvature of trajectories. This result, however, cannot rule out a shift of an equilibrium point or an additional synergy activation between start and end point of a movement. In our experiment, subjects did two sessions, one control without and one with velocity-profile manipulation. To skew the velocity profile of the cursor trajectory, we added to the current velocity, v, the function 0.8*v*cos(pi + pi*x), where x is the projection of the cursor position onto the start-goal line divided by the distance start to goal (x=0 at the start point). As result, subjects did not adapt to this manipulation: for all subjects, the true hand motion was not significantly modified in a direction consistent with adaptation, despite that the visually presented motion differed significantly from the control motion. One may still argue that this difference in motion was insufficient to be processed visually. Thus, as a control experiment, we replayed control and modified motions to the subjects and asked which of the two motions appeared 'more natural'. Subjects chose the unperturbed motion as more natural significantly better than chance. In summary, for a visuomotor transformation task, the hypothesis of a planned continuous end-effector trajectory predicts adaptation to a modified velocity profile. The current experiment found no adaptation under such transformation.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design and Numerical Modeling of an On-Board Chemical Release Module for Motion Control of Bacteria-Propelled Swimming Micro-Robots

Behkam, B., Nain, A. S., Amon, C. H., Sitti, M.

In ASME 2008 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, pages: 239-244, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Investigation of Calcium Mechanotransduction by Quasi 3-D Microfiber Mechanical Stimulation of Cells

Ruder, W. C., Pratt, E. D., Sitti, M., LeDuc, P. R., Antaki, J. F.

In ASME 2008 Summer Bioengineering Conference, pages: 1049-1050, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Beanbag robotics: Robotic swarms with 1-dof units

Kriesel, D. M., Cheung, E., Sitti, M., Lipson, H.

In International Conference on Ant Colony Optimization and Swarm Intelligence, pages: 267-274, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Particle image velocimetry and thrust of flagellar micro propulsion systems

Danis, U., Sitti, M., Pekkan, K.

In APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting Abstracts, 1, 2008 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A modular bio-inspired architecture for movement generation for the infant-like robot iCub

Degallier, S., Righetti, L., Natale, L., Nori, F., Metta, G., Ijspeert, A.

In 2008 2nd IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, pages: 795-800, IEEE, Scottsdale, USA, October 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Movement generation in humans appears to be processed through a three-layered architecture, where each layer corresponds to a different level of abstraction in the representation of the movement. In this article, we will present an architecture reflecting this organization and based on a modular approach to human movement generation. We will show that our architecture is well suited for the online generation and modulation of motor behaviors, but also for switching between motor behaviors. This will be illustrated respectively through an interactive drumming task and through switching between reaching and crawling.

mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Study of the intermixing of Fe\textendashPt multilayers by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

Sigle, W., Kaiser, T., Goll, D., Goo, N. H., Srot, V., van Aken, P. A., Detemple, E., Jäger, W.

In EMC2008, 14th European Microscopy Congress, Vol. 2: Materials Science, pages: 109-110, Springer, Aachen, Germany, 2008 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2003


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On the Complexity of Learning the Kernel Matrix

Bousquet, O., Herrmann, D.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 399-406, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate data based procedures for selecting the kernel when learning with Support Vector Machines. We provide generalization error bounds by estimating the Rademacher complexities of the corresponding function classes. In particular we obtain a complexity bound for function classes induced by kernels with given eigenvectors, i.e., we allow to vary the spectrum and keep the eigenvectors fix. This bound is only a logarithmic factor bigger than the complexity of the function class induced by a single kernel. However, optimizing the margin over such classes leads to overfitting. We thus propose a suitable way of constraining the class. We use an efficient algorithm to solve the resulting optimization problem, present preliminary experimental results, and compare them to an alignment-based approach.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2003


PDF Web [BibTex]


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Cluster Kernels for Semi-Supervised Learning

Chapelle, O., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 585-592, (Editors: S Becker and S Thrun and K Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 16th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a framework to incorporate unlabeled data in kernel classifier, based on the idea that two points in the same cluster are more likely to have the same label. This is achieved by modifying the eigenspectrum of the kernel matrix. Experimental results assess the validity of this approach.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Mismatch String Kernels for SVM Protein Classification

Leslie, C., Eskin, E., Weston, J., Noble, W.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1417-1424, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We introduce a class of string kernels, called mismatch kernels, for use with support vector machines (SVMs) in a discriminative approach to the protein classification problem. These kernels measure sequence similarity based on shared occurrences of k-length subsequences, counted with up to m mismatches, and do not rely on any generative model for the positive training sequences. We compute the kernels efficiently using a mismatch tree data structure and report experiments on a benchmark SCOP dataset, where we show that the mismatch kernel used with an SVM classifier performs as well as the Fisher kernel, the most successful method for remote homology detection, while achieving considerable computational savings.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Kernel Dependency Estimation

Weston, J., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Vapnik, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 873-880, (Editors: S Becker and S Thrun and K Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 16th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Linear Combinations of Optic Flow Vectors for Estimating Self-Motion: a Real-World Test of a Neural Model

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1319-1326, (Editors: Becker, S., S. Thrun and K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an estimator consisting of a linear combination of optic flow vectors that incorporates prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and self-motion statistics of the sensor. The estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Clustering with the Fisher score

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 729-736, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently the Fisher score (or the Fisher kernel) is increasingly used as a feature extractor for classification problems. The Fisher score is a vector of parameter derivatives of loglikelihood of a probabilistic model. This paper gives a theoretical analysis about how class information is preserved in the space of the Fisher score, which turns out that the Fisher score consists of a few important dimensions with class information and many nuisance dimensions. When we perform clustering with the Fisher score, K-Means type methods are obviously inappropriate because they make use of all dimensions. So we will develop a novel but simple clustering algorithm specialized for the Fisher score, which can exploit important dimensions. This algorithm is successfully tested in experiments with artificial data and real data (amino acid sequences).

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Marginalized Kernels between Labeled Graphs

Kashima, H., Tsuda, K., Inokuchi, A.

In 20th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 321-328, (Editors: Faucett, T. and N. Mishra), 20th International Conference on Machine Learning, August 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Sparse Gaussian Processes: inference, subspace identification and model selection

Csato, L., Opper, M.

In Proceedings, pages: 1-6, (Editors: Van der Hof, , Wahlberg), The Netherlands, 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identifiaction, August 2003, electronical version; Index ThA02-2 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Gaussian Process (GP) inference is a probabilistic kernel method where the GP is treated as a latent function. The inference is carried out using the Bayesian online learning and its extension to the more general iterative approach which we call TAP/EP learning. Sparsity is introduced in this context to make the TAP/EP method applicable to large datasets. We address the prohibitive scaling of the number of parameters by defining a subset of the training data that is used as the support the GP, thus the number of required parameters is independent of the training set, similar to the case of ``Support--‘‘ or ``Relevance--Vectors‘‘. An advantage of the full probabilistic treatment is that allows the computation of the marginal data likelihood or evidence, leading to hyper-parameter estimation within the GP inference. An EM algorithm to choose the hyper-parameters is proposed. The TAP/EP learning is the E-step and the M-step then updates the hyper-parameters. Due to the sparse E-step the resulting algorithm does not involve manipulation of large matrices. The presented algorithm is applicable to a wide variety of likelihood functions. We present results of applying the algorithm on classification and nonstandard regression problems for artificial and real datasets.

ei

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]


no image
Adaptive, Cautious, Predictive control with Gaussian Process Priors

Murray-Smith, R., Sbarbaro, D., Rasmussen, CE., Girard, A.

In Proceedings of the 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identification, pages: 1195-1200, (Editors: Van den Hof, P., B. Wahlberg and S. Weiland), Proceedings of the 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identification, August 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Nonparametric Gaussian Process models, a Bayesian statistics approach, are used to implement a nonlinear adaptive control law. Predictions, including propagation of the state uncertainty are made over a k-step horizon. The expected value of a quadratic cost function is minimised, over this prediction horizon, without ignoring the variance of the model predictions. The general method and its main features are illustrated on a simulation example.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
On the Representation, Learning and Transfer of Spatio-Temporal Movement Characteristics

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Mezger, J., Giese, MA.

In Humanoids Proceedings, pages: 0-0, Humanoids Proceedings, July 2003, electronical version (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we present a learning-based approach for the modelling of complex movement sequences. Based on the method of Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models (STMMS. We derive a hierarchical algorithm that, in a first step, identifies automatically movement elements in movement sequences based on a coarse spatio-temporal description, and in a second step models these movement primitives by approximation through linear combinations of learned example movement trajectories. We describe the different steps of the algorithm and show how it can be applied for modelling and synthesis of complex sequences of human movements that contain movement elements with variable style. The proposed method is demonstrated on different applications of movement representation relevant for imitation learning of movement styles in humanoid robotics.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
A case based comparison of identification with neural network and Gaussian process models.

Kocijan, J., Banko, B., Likar, B., Girard, A., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Control Systems and Signal Processing ICONS 2003, 1, pages: 137-142, (Editors: Ruano, E.A.), Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Control Systems and Signal Processing ICONS, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper an alternative approach to black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems is compared with the more established approach of using artificial neural networks. The Gaussian process prior approach is a representative of non-parametric modelling approaches. It was compared on a pH process modelling case study. The purpose of modelling was to use the model for control design. The comparison revealed that even though Gaussian process models can be effectively used for modelling dynamic systems caution has to be axercised when signals are selected.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
On-Line One-Class Support Vector Machines. An Application to Signal Segmentation

Gretton, A., Desobry, ..

In IEEE ICASSP Vol. 2, pages: 709-712, IEEE ICASSP, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we describe an efficient algorithm to sequentially update a density support estimate obtained using one-class support vector machines. The solution provided is an exact solution, which proves to be far more computationally attractive than a batch approach. This deterministic technique is applied to the problem of audio signal segmentation, with simulations demonstrating the computational performance gain on toy data sets, and the accuracy of the segmentation on audio signals.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


no image
The Kernel Mutual Information

Gretton, A., Herbrich, R., Smola, A.

In IEEE ICASSP Vol. 4, pages: 880-883, IEEE ICASSP, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We introduce a new contrast function, the kernel mutual information (KMI), to measure the degree of independence of continuous random variables. This contrast function provides an approximate upper bound on the mutual information, as measured near independence, and is based on a kernel density estimate of the mutual information between a discretised approximation of the continuous random variables. We show that Bach and Jordan‘s kernel generalised variance (KGV) is also an upper bound on the same kernel density estimate, but is looser. Finally, we suggest that the addition of a regularising term in the KGV causes it to approach the KMI, which motivates the introduction of this regularisation.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Dynamic movement primitives - A framework for motor control in humans and humanoid robots

Schaal, S.

In The International Symposium on Adaptive Motion of Animals and Machines, Kyoto, Japan, March 4-8, 2003, March 2003, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Sensory-motor integration is one of the key issues in robotics. In this paper, we propose an approach to rhythmic arm movement control that is synchronized with an external signal based on exploiting a simple neural oscillator network. Trajectory generation by the neural oscillator is a biologically inspired method that can allow us to generate a smooth and continuous trajectory. The parameter tuning of the oscillators is used to generate a synchronized movement with wide intervals. We adopted the method for the drumming task as an example task. By using this method, the robot can realize synchronized drumming with wide drumming intervals in real time. The paper also shows the experimental results of drumming by a humanoid robot.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models for Representation of complex movements for Imitation Learning

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Franz, MO., Giese, M.

In 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, (2):453-458, (Editors: Nunes, U., A. de Almeida, A. Bejczy, K. Kosuge and J.A.T. Machado), 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, January 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Feature Selection for Support Vector Machines by Means of Genetic Algorithms

Fröhlich, H., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, pages: 142-148, 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Propagation of Uncertainty in Bayesian Kernel Models - Application to Multiple-Step Ahead Forecasting

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Girard, A., Larsen, J., Rasmussen, CE.

In IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2, pages: 701-704, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The object of Bayesian modelling is the predictive distribution, which in a forecasting scenario enables improved estimates of forecasted values and their uncertainties. In this paper we focus on reliably estimating the predictive mean and variance of forecasted values using Bayesian kernel based models such as the Gaussian Process and the Relevance Vector Machine. We derive novel analytic expressions for the predictive mean and variance for Gaussian kernel shapes under the assumption of a Gaussian input distribution in the static case, and of a recursive Gaussian predictive density in iterative forecasting. The capability of the method is demonstrated for forecasting of time-series and compared to approximate methods.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Clustering of Images using their Joint Segmentation

Seldin, Y., Starik, S., Werman, M.

In The 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV 2003), pages: 1-24, 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV), 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Methods and Their Applications to Signal Processing

Bousquet, O., Perez-Cruz, F.

In Proceedings. (ICASSP ‘03), Special Session on Kernel Methods, pages: 860 , ICASSP, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently introduced in Machine Learning, the notion of kernels has drawn a lot of interest as it allows to obtain non-linear algorithms from linear ones in a simple and elegant manner. This, in conjunction with the introduction of new linear classification methods such as the Support Vector Machines has produced significant progress. The successes of such algorithms is now spreading as they are applied to more and more domains. Many Signal Processing problems, by their non-linear and high-dimensional nature may benefit from such techniques. We give an overview of kernel methods and their recent applications.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Predictive control with Gaussian process models

Kocijan, J., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE., Likar, B.

In Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon 2003: Computer as a Tool, pages: 352-356, (Editors: Zajc, B. and M. Tkal), Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon: Computer as a Tool, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper describes model-based predictive control based on Gaussian processes.Gaussian process models provide a probabilistic non-parametric modelling approach for black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems. It offers more insight in variance of obtained model response, as well as fewer parameters to determine than other models. The Gaussian processes can highlight areas of the input space where prediction quality is poor, due to the lack of data or its complexity, by indicating the higher variance around the predicted mean. This property is used in predictive control, where optimisation of control signal takes the variance information into account. The predictive control principle is demonstrated on a simulated example of nonlinear system.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Distance-based classification with Lipschitz functions

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O.

In Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, pages: 314-328, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. and M.K. Warmuth), Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to develop a framework for large margin classification in metric spaces. We want to find a generalization of linear decision functions for metric spaces and define a corresponding notion of margin such that the decision function separates the training points with a large margin. It will turn out that using Lipschitz functions as decision functions, the inverse of the Lipschitz constant can be interpreted as the size of a margin. In order to construct a clean mathematical setup we isometrically embed the given metric space into a Banach space and the space of Lipschitz functions into its dual space. Our approach leads to a general large margin algorithm for classification in metric spaces. To analyze this algorithm, we first prove a representer theorem. It states that there exists a solution which can be expressed as linear combination of distances to sets of training points. Then we analyze the Rademacher complexity of some Lipschitz function classes. The generality of the Lipschitz approach can be seen from the fact that several well-known algorithms are special cases of the Lipschitz algorithm, among them the support vector machine, the linear programming machine, and the 1-nearest neighbor classifier.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]