3242 results (BibTeX)

1997


Improving the accuracy and speed of support vector learning machines

Burges, C., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9, pages: 375-381, (Editors: M Mozer and MJ Jordan and T Petsche), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Tenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), May 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Support Vector Learning Machines (SVM) are finding application in pattern recognition, regression estimation, and operator inversion for illposed problems . Against this very general backdrop any methods for improving the generalization performance, or for improving the speed in test phase of SVMs are of increasing interest. In this paper we combine two such techniques on a pattern recognition problem The method for improving generalization performance the "virtual support vector" method does so by incorporating known invariances of the problem This method achieves a drop in the error rate on 10.000 NIST test digit images of 1,4 % to 1 %. The method for improving the speed (the "reduced set" method) does so by approximating the support vector decision surface. We apply this method to achieve a factor of fifty speedup in test phase over the virtual support vector machine The combined approach yields a machine which is both 22 times faster than the original machine, and which has better generalization performance achieving 1,1 % error . The virtual support vector method is applicable to any SVM problem with known invariances The reduced set method is applicable to any support vector machine .

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

1997


PDF Web [BibTex]


Kernel principal component analysis

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

In Artificial neural networks: ICANN ’97, LNCS, vol. 1327, pages: 583-588, (Editors: W Gerstner and A Germond and M Hasler and J-D Nicoud), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A new method for performing a nonlinear form of Principal Component Analysis is proposed. By the use of integral operator kernel functions, one can efficiently compute principal components in highdimensional feature spaces, related to input space by some nonlinear map; for instance the space of all possible d-pixel products in images. We give the derivation of the method and present experimental results on polynomial feature extraction for pattern recognition.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


Locally weighted learning for control

Atkeson, C., Moore, A., Schaal, S.

Artificial Intelligence Review, 11(1-5):75-113, 1997, clmc (article)

Abstract
Lazy learning methods provide useful representations and training algorithms for learning about complex phenomena during autonomous adaptive control of complex systems. This paper surveys ways in which locally weighted learning, a type of lazy learning, has been applied by us to control tasks. We explain various forms that control tasks can take, and how this affects the choice of learning paradigm. The discussion section explores the interesting impact that explicitly remembering all previous experiences has on the problem of learning to control. Keywords: locally weighted regression, LOESS, LWR, lazy learning, memory-based learning, least commitment learning, forward models, inverse models, linear quadratic regulation (LQR), shifting setpoint algorithm, dynamic programming.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Learning from demonstration

Schaal, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9, pages: 1040-1046, (Editors: Mozer, M. C.;Jordan, M.;Petsche, T.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1997, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
By now it is widely accepted that learning a task from scratch, i.e., without any prior knowledge, is a daunting undertaking. Humans, however, rarely attempt to learn from scratch. They extract initial biases as well as strategies how to approach a learning problem from instructions and/or demonstrations of other humans. For learning control, this paper investigates how learning from demonstration can be applied in the context of reinforcement learning. We consider priming the Q-function, the value function, the policy, and the model of the task dynamics as possible areas where demonstrations can speed up learning. In general nonlinear learning problems, only model-based reinforcement learning shows significant speed-up after a demonstration, while in the special case of linear quadratic regulator (LQR) problems, all methods profit from the demonstration. In an implementation of pole balancing on a complex anthropomorphic robot arm, we demonstrate that, when facing the complexities of real signal processing, model-based reinforcement learning offers the most robustness for LQR problems. Using the suggested methods, the robot learns pole balancing in just a single trial after a 30 second long demonstration of the human instructor. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

Vaziri, H., MD, . RC, . Davison, T., YS, . CH, . GG, . Benchimol, S.

The European Molecular Biology Organization Journal, 16(19):6018-6033, 1997 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


Homing by parameterized scene matching

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the 4th European Conference on Artificial Life, (Eds.) P. Husbands, I. Harvey. MIT Press, Cambridge 1997, pages: 236-245, (Editors: P Husbands and I Harvey), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 4th European Conference on Artificial Life (ECAL97), July 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In visual homing tasks, animals as well as robots can compute their movements from the current view and a snapshot taken at a home position. Solving this problem exactly would require knowledge about the distances to visible landmarks, information, which is not directly available to passive vision systems. We propose a homing scheme that dispenses with accurate distance information by using parameterized disparity fields. These are obtained from an approximation that incorporates prior knowledge about perspective distortions of the visual environment. A mathematical analysis proves that the approximation does not prevent the scheme from approaching the goal with arbitrary accuracy. Mobile robot experiments are used to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


Robot learning from demonstration

Atkeson, C., Schaal, S.

In Machine Learning: Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Conference (ICML ’97), pages: 12-20, (Editors: Fisher Jr., D. H.), Morgan Kaufmann, Nashville, TN, July 8-12, 1997, 1997, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of robot learning from demonstration is to have a robot learn from watching a demonstration of the task to be performed. In our approach to learning from demonstration the robot learns a reward function from the demonstration and a task model from repeated attempts to perform the task. A policy is computed based on the learned reward function and task model. Lessons learned from an implementation on an anthropomorphic robot arm using a pendulum swing up task include 1) simply mimicking demonstrated motions is not adequate to perform this task, 2) a task planner can use a learned model and reward function to compute an appropriate policy, 3) this model-based planning process supports rapid learning, 4) both parametric and nonparametric models can be learned and used, and 5) incorporating a task level direct learning component, which is non-model-based, in addition to the model-based planner, is useful in compensating for structural modeling errors and slow model learning. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Local dimensionality reduction for locally weighted learning

Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Robotics and Automation, pages: 220-225, Monteray, CA, July10-11, 1997, 1997, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Incremental learning of sensorimotor transformations in high dimensional spaces is one of the basic prerequisites for the success of autonomous robot devices as well as biological movement systems. So far, due to sparsity of data in high dimensional spaces, learning in such settings requires a significant amount of prior knowledge about the learning task, usually provided by a human expert. In this paper we suggest a partial revision of the view. Based on empirical studies, it can been observed that, despite being globally high dimensional and sparse, data distributions from physical movement systems are locally low dimensional and dense. Under this assumption, we derive a learning algorithm, Locally Adaptive Subspace Regression, that exploits this property by combining a local dimensionality reduction as a preprocessing step with a nonparametric learning technique, locally weighted regression. The usefulness of the algorithm and the validity of its assumptions are illustrated for a synthetic data set and data of the inverse dynamics of an actual 7 degree-of-freedom anthropomorphic robot arm.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Support vector learning

Schölkopf, B.

pages: 173, Oldenbourg, München, Germany, 1997, Zugl.: Berlin, Techn. Univ., Diss., 1997 (book)

ei

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]


Learning view graphs for robot navigation

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Georg, P., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the 1st Intl. Conf. on Autonomous Agents, pages: 138-147, (Editors: Johnson, W.L.), ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, First International Conference on Autonomous Agents (AGENTS '97), Febuary 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a purely vision-based scheme for learning a parsimonious representation of an open environment. Using simple exploration behaviours, our system constructs a graph of appropriately chosen views. To navigate between views connected in the graph, we employ a homing strategy inspired by findings of insect ethology. Simulations and robot experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


Learning tasks from a single demonstration

Atkeson, C., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA97), 2, pages: 1706-1712, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, Albuquerque, NM, 20-25 April, 1997, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Learning a complex dynamic robot manoeuvre from a single human demonstration is difficult. This paper explores an approach to learning from demonstration based on learning an optimization criterion from the demonstration and a task model from repeated attempts to perform the task, and using the learned criterion and model to compute an appropriate robot movement. A preliminary version of the approach has been implemented on an anthropomorphic robot arm using a pendulum swing up task as an example

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

1996


Thumb md miximages
Mixture Models for Image Representation

Jepson, A., Black, M. J.

PRECARN ARK Project Technical Report ARK96-PUB-54, March 1996 (techreport)

Abstract
We consider the estimation of local greylevel image structure in terms of a layered representation. This type of representation has recently been successfully used to segment various objects from clutter using either optical ow or stereo disparity information. We argue that the same type of representation is useful for greylevel data in that it allows for the estimation of properties for each of several different components without prior segmentation. Our emphasis in this paper is on the process used to extract such a layered representation from a given image In particular we consider a variant of the EM algorithm for the estimation of the layered model and consider a novel technique for choosing the number of layers to use. We briefly consider the use of a simple version of this approach for image segmentation and suggest two potential applications to the ARK project

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pdf [BibTex]

1996


pdf [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2013 01 14 um 10.52.58
EigenTracking: Robust matching and tracking of articulated objects using a view-based representation

Black, M. J., Jepson, A.

In Proc. Fourth European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV’96, pages: 329-342, LNCS 1064, Springer Verlag, Cambridge, England, April 1996 (inproceedings)

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pdf video [BibTex]

pdf video [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2013 01 14 um 10.48.32
Skin and Bones: Multi-layer, locally affine, optical flow and regularization with transparency

(Nominated: Best paper)

Ju, S., Black, M. J., Jepson, A.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR’96, pages: 307-314, San Francisco, CA, June 1996 (inproceedings)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2013 01 14 um 10.40.24
Cardboard people: A parameterized model of articulated motion

Ju, S., Black, M. J., error., Yacoob, Y.

In 2nd Int. Conf. on Automatic Face- and Gesture-Recognition, pages: 38-44, Killington, Vermont, October 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We extend the work of Black and Yacoob on the tracking and recognition of human facial expressions using parameterized models of optical flow to deal with the articulated motion of human limbs. We define a "cardboard person model" in which a person's limbs are represented by a set of connected planar patches. The parameterized image motion of these patches is constrained to enforce articulated motion and is solved for directly using a robust estimation technique. The recovered motion parameters provide a rich and concise description of the activity that can be used for recognition. We propose a method for performing view-based recognition of human activities from the optical flow parameters that extends previous methods to cope with the cyclical nature of human motion. We illustrate the method with examples of tracking human legs over long image sequences.

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2012 12 07 um 12.09.01
The robust estimation of multiple motions: Parametric and piecewise-smooth flow fields

Black, M. J., Anandan, P.

Computer Vision and Image Understanding, 63(1):75-104, January 1996 (article)

Abstract
Most approaches for estimating optical flow assume that, within a finite image region, only a single motion is present. This single motion assumption is violated in common situations involving transparency, depth discontinuities, independently moving objects, shadows, and specular reflections. To robustly estimate optical flow, the single motion assumption must be relaxed. This paper presents a framework based on robust estimation that addresses violations of the brightness constancy and spatial smoothness assumptions caused by multiple motions. We show how the robust estimation framework can be applied to standard formulations of the optical flow problem thus reducing their sensitivity to violations of their underlying assumptions. The approach has been applied to three standard techniques for recovering optical flow: area-based regression, correlation, and regularization with motion discontinuities. This paper focuses on the recovery of multiple parametric motion models within a region, as well as the recovery of piecewise-smooth flow fields, and provides examples with natural and synthetic image sequences.

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pdf pdf from publisher [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2012 12 07 um 11.59.00
On the unification of line processes, outlier rejection, and robust statistics with applications in early vision

Black, M. J., Rangarajan, A.

International Journal of Computer Vision , 19(1):57-92, July 1996 (article)

Abstract
The modeling of spatial discontinuities for problems such as surface recovery, segmentation, image reconstruction, and optical flow has been intensely studied in computer vision. While “line-process” models of discontinuities have received a great deal of attention, there has been recent interest in the use of robust statistical techniques to account for discontinuities. This paper unifies the two approaches. To achieve this we generalize the notion of a “line process” to that of an analog “outlier process” and show how a problem formulated in terms of outlier processes can be viewed in terms of robust statistics. We also characterize a class of robust statistical problems for which an equivalent outlier-process formulation exists and give a straightforward method for converting a robust estimation problem into an outlier-process formulation. We show how prior assumptions about the spatial structure of outliers can be expressed as constraints on the recovered analog outlier processes and how traditional continuation methods can be extended to the explicit outlier-process formulation. These results indicate that the outlier-process approach provides a general framework which subsumes the traditional line-process approaches as well as a wide class of robust estimation problems. Examples in surface reconstruction, image segmentation, and optical flow are presented to illustrate the use of outlier processes and to show how the relationship between outlier processes and robust statistics can be exploited. An appendix provides a catalog of common robust error norms and their equivalent outlier-process formulations.

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pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2012 12 07 um 11.52.07
Estimating optical flow in segmented images using variable-order parametric models with local deformations

Black, M. J., Jepson, A.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 18(10):972-986, October 1996 (article)

Abstract
This paper presents a new model for estimating optical flow based on the motion of planar regions plus local deformations. The approach exploits brightness information to organize and constrain the interpretation of the motion by using segmented regions of piecewise smooth brightness to hypothesize planar regions in the scene. Parametric flow models are estimated in these regions in a two step process which first computes a coarse fit and estimates the appropriate parameterization of the motion of the region (two, six, or eight parameters). The initial fit is refined using a generalization of the standard area-based regression approaches. Since the assumption of planarity is likely to be violated, we allow local deformations from the planar assumption in the same spirit as physically-based approaches which model shape using coarse parametric models plus local deformations. This parametric+deformation model exploits the strong constraints of parametric approaches while retaining the adaptive nature of regularization approaches. Experimental results on a variety of images indicate that the parametric+deformation model produces accurate flow estimates while the incorporation of brightness segmentation provides precise localization of motion boundaries.

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pdf pdf from publisher [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher [BibTex]


A Kendama learning robot based on bi-directional theory

Miyamoto, H., Schaal, S., Gandolfo, F., Koike, Y., Osu, R., Nakano, E., Wada, Y., Kawato, M.

Neural Networks, 9(8):1281-1302, 1996, clmc (article)

Abstract
A general theory of movement-pattern perception based on bi-directional theory for sensory-motor integration can be used for motion capture and learning by watching in robotics. We demonstrate our methods using the game of Kendama, executed by the SARCOS Dextrous Slave Arm, which has a very similar kinematic structure to the human arm. Three ingredients have to be integrated for the successful execution of this task. The ingredients are (1) to extract via-points from a human movement trajectory using a forward-inverse relaxation model, (2) to treat via-points as a control variable while reconstructing the desired trajectory from all the via-points, and (3) to modify the via-points for successful execution. In order to test the validity of the via-point representation, we utilized a numerical model of the SARCOS arm, and examined the behavior of the system under several conditions.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Evaluation of Gaussian Processes and other Methods for Non-Linear Regression

Rasmussen, CE.

Biologische Kybernetik, Graduate Department of Computer Science, Univeristy of Toronto, 1996 (phdthesis)

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


A practical Monte Carlo implementation of Bayesian learning

Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 8, pages: 598-604, (Editors: Touretzky, D.S. , M.C. Mozer, M.E. Hasselmo), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Ninth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A practical method for Bayesian training of feed-forward neural networks using sophisticated Monte Carlo methods is presented and evaluated. In reasonably small amounts of computer time this approach outperforms other state-of-the-art methods on 5 datalimited tasks from real world domains.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


Künstliches Lernen

Schölkopf, B.

In Komplexe adaptive Systeme, Forum für Interdisziplinäre Forschung, 15, pages: 93-117, Forum für interdisziplinäre Forschung, (Editors: S Bornholdt and PH Feindt), Röll, Dettelbach, 1996 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Comparison of view-based object recognition algorithms using realistic 3D models

Blanz, V., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H., Burges, C., Vapnik, V., Vetter, T.

In Artificial Neural Networks: ICANN 96, LNCS, vol. 1112, pages: 251-256, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: C von der Malsburg and W von Seelen and JC Vorbrüggen and B Sendhoff), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 6th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, July 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Two view-based object recognition algorithms are compared: (1) a heuristic algorithm based on oriented filters, and (2) a support vector learning machine trained on low-resolution images of the objects. Classification performance is assessed using a high number of images generated by a computer graphics system under precisely controlled conditions. Training- and test-images show a set of 25 realistic three-dimensional models of chairs from viewing directions spread over the upper half of the viewing sphere. The percentage of correct identification of all 25 objects is measured.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


From isolation to cooperation: An alternative of a system of experts

Schaal, S., Atkeson, C.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 8, pages: 605-611, (Editors: Touretzky, D. S.;Mozer, M. C.;Hasselmo, M. E.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1996, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
We introduce a constructive, incremental learning system for regression problems that models data by means of locally linear experts. In contrast to other approaches, the experts are trained independently and do not compete for data during learning. Only when a prediction for a query is required do the experts cooperate by blending their individual predictions. Each expert is trained by minimizing a penalized local cross validation error using second order methods. In this way, an expert is able to adjust the size and shape of the receptive field in which its predictions are valid, and also to adjust its bias on the importance of individual input dimensions. The size and shape adjustment corresponds to finding a local distance metric, while the bias adjustment accomplishes local dimensionality reduction. We derive asymptotic results for our method. In a variety of simulations we demonstrate the properties of the algorithm with respect to interference, learning speed, prediction accuracy, feature detection, and task oriented incremental learning. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Quality Prediction of Steel Products using Neural Networks

Shin, H., Jhee, W.

In Proc. of the Korean Expert System Conference, pages: 112-124, Korean Expert System Society Conference, November 1996 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


The DELVE user manual

Rasmussen, CE. Neal, RM. Hinton, GE. van Camp, D. Revow, M. Ghahramani, Z. Kustra, R. Tibshirani, R.

Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, December 1996 (techreport)

Abstract
This manual describes the preliminary release of the DELVE environment. Some features described here have not yet implemented, as noted. Support for regression tasks is presently somewhat more developed than that for classification tasks. We recommend that you exercise caution when using this version of DELVE for real work, as it is possible that bugs remain in the software. We hope that you will send us reports of any problems you encounter, as well as any other comments you may have on the software or manual, at the e-mail address below. Please mention the version number of the manual and/or the software with any comments you send.

ei

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


Learning View Graphs for Robot Navigation

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Georg, P., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H.

(33), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen,, July 1996 (techreport)

Abstract
We present a purely vision-based scheme for learning a parsimonious representation of an open environment. Using simple exploration behaviours, our system constructs a graph of appropriately chosen views. To navigate between views connected in the graph, we employ a homing strategy inspired by findings of insect ethology. Simulations and robot experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Aktives Erwerben eines Ansichtsgraphen zur diskreten Repräsentation offener Umwelten.

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H.

Fortschritte der K{\"u}nstlichen Intelligenz, pages: 138-147, (Editors: M. Thielscher and S.-E. Bornscheuer), 1996 (poster)

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


One-handed juggling: A dynamical approach to a rhythmic movement task

Schaal, S., Sternad, D., Atkeson, C.

Journal of Motor Behavior, 28(2):165-183, 1996, clmc (article)

Abstract
The skill of rhythmic juggling a ball on a racket is investigated from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics. The difference equations that model the dynamical system are analyzed by means of local and non-local stability analyses. These analyses yield that the task dynamics offer an economical juggling pattern which is stable even for open-loop actuator motion. For this pattern, two types of pre dictions are extracted: (i) Stable periodic bouncing is sufficiently characterized by a negative acceleration of the racket at the moment of impact with the ball; (ii) A nonlinear scaling relation maps different juggling trajectories onto one topologically equivalent dynamical system. The relevance of these results for the human control of action was evaluated in an experiment where subjects performed a comparable task of juggling a ball on a paddle. Task manipulations involved different juggling heights and gravity conditions of the ball. The predictions were confirmed: (i) For stable rhythmic performance the paddle's acceleration at impact is negative and fluctuations of the impact acceleration follow predictions from global stability analysis; (ii) For each subject, the realizations of juggling for the different experimental conditions are related by the scaling relation. These results allow the conclusion that for the given task, humans reliably exploit the stable solutions inherent to the dynamics of the task and do not overrule these dynamics by other control mechanisms. The dynamical scaling serves as an efficient principle to generate different movement realizations from only a few parameter changes and is discussed as a dynamical formalization of the principle of motor equivalence.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Gaussian Processes for Regression

Williams, CKI. Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 8, pages: 514-520, (Editors: Touretzky, D.S. , M.C. Mozer, M.E. Hasselmo), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Ninth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Bayesian analysis of neural networks is difficult because a simple prior over weights implies a complex prior over functions. We investigate the use of a Gaussian process prior over functions, which permits the predictive Bayesian analysis for fixed values of hyperparameters to be carried out exactly using matrix operations. Two methods, using optimization and averaging (via Hybrid Monte Carlo) over hyperparameters have been tested on a number of challenging problems and have produced excellent results.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


Does motion-blur facilitate motion detection ?

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

OSA Conference Program, pages: S127, 1996 (poster)

Abstract
Retinal-image motion induces the perceptual loss of high spatial-frequency content - motion blur - that affects broadband stimuli. The relative detectability of motion blur and motion itself, measured in 2-AFC experiments, shows that, although the blur associated with motion can be detected, motion itself is the more effective cue.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Nonlinear Component Analysis as a Kernel Eigenvalue Problem

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

(44), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics Tübingen, December 1996, This technical report has also been published elsewhere (techreport)

Abstract
We describe a new method for performing a nonlinear form of Principal Component Analysis. By the use of integral operator kernel functions, we can efficiently compute principal components in high-dimensional feature spaces, related to input space by some nonlinear map; for instance the space of all possible 5-pixel products in 16 x 16 images. We give the derivation of the method, along with a discussion of other techniques which can be made nonlinear with the kernel approach; and present first experimental results on nonlinear feature extraction for pattern recognition.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


A kendama learning robot based on a dynamic optimiation principle

Miyamoto, H., Gandolfo, F., Gomi, H., Schaal, S., Koike, Y., Rieka, O., Nakano, E., Wada, Y., Kawato, M.

In Preceedings of the International Conference on Neural Information Processing, pages: 938-942, Hong Kong, September 1996, clmc (inproceedings)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Incorporating invariances in support vector learning machines

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Vapnik, V.

In Artificial Neural Networks: ICANN 96, LNCS vol. 1112, pages: 47-52, (Editors: C von der Malsburg and W von Seelen and JC Vorbrüggen and B Sendhoff), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 6th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, July 1996, volume 1112 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science (inproceedings)

Abstract
Developed only recently, support vector learning machines achieve high generalization ability by minimizing a bound on the expected test error; however, so far there existed no way of adding knowledge about invariances of a classification problem at hand. We present a method of incorporating prior knowledge about transformation invariances by applying transformations to support vectors, the training examples most critical for determining the classification boundary.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]

1995


A computational model for shape from texture for multiple textures

Black, M. J., Rosenholtz, R.

Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science Supplement, Vol. 36, No. 4, pages: 2202, March 1995 (conference)

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abstract [BibTex]

1995


abstract [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2013 01 14 um 11.24.02
Tracking and recognizing rigid and non-rigid facial motions using local parametric models of image motion

Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y.

In Fifth International Conf. on Computer Vision, ICCV’95, pages: 347-381, Boston, MA, June 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper explores the use of local parametrized models of image motion for recovering and recognizing the non-rigid and articulated motion of human faces. Parametric flow models (for example affine) are popular for estimating motion in rigid scenes. We observe that within local regions in space and time, such models not only accurately model non-rigid facial motions but also provide a concise description of the motion in terms of a small number of parameters. These parameters are intuitively related to the motion of facial features during facial expressions and we show how expressions such as anger, happiness, surprise, fear, disgust and sadness can be recognized from the local parametric motions in the presence of significant head motion. The motion tracking and expression recognition approach performs with high accuracy in extensive laboratory experiments involving 40 subjects as well as in television and movie sequences.

ps

pdf video publisher site [BibTex]

pdf video publisher site [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2013 01 14 um 11.06.54
Recognizing facial expressions under rigid and non-rigid facial motions using local parametric models of image motion

Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y.

In International Workshop on Automatic Face- and Gesture-Recognition, Zurich, July 1995 (inproceedings)

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video abstract [BibTex]

video abstract [BibTex]


The PLAYBOT Project

Tsotsos, J., Dickinson, S., Jenkin, M., Milios, E., Jepson, A., Down, B., Amdur, E., Stevenson, S., Black, M. J., Metaxas, D., Cooperstock, J., Culhane, S., Nuflo, F., Verghese, G., Wai, W., Wilkes, D., Ye, Y.

In Proc. IJCAI Workshop on AI Applications for Disabled People, Montreal, August 1995 (inproceedings)

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abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]


Thumb md bildschirmfoto 2013 01 14 um 10.58.31
Robust estimation of multiple surface shapes from occluded textures

Black, M. J., Rosenholtz, R.

In International Symposium on Computer Vision, pages: 485-490, Miami, FL, November 1995 (inproceedings)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Thumb md patentc
Image segmentation using robust mixture models

Black, M. J., Jepson, A.

US Pat. 5,802,203, June 1995 (patent)

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pdf on-line at USPTO [BibTex]

pdf on-line at USPTO [BibTex]


View-based cognitive map learning by an autonomous robot

Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H., Georg, P., Schölkopf, B., Yasuhara, K.

In Proceedings International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, vol. 2, pages: 381-386, (Editors: Fogelman-Soulié, F.), EC2, Paris, France, Conférence Internationale sur les Réseaux de Neurones Artificiels (ICANN '95), October 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper presents a view-based approach to map learning and navigation in mazes. By means of graph theory we have shown that the view-graph is a sufficient representation for map behaviour such as path planning. A neural network for unsupervised learning of the view-graph from sequences of views is constructed. We use a modified Kohonen (1988) learning rule that transforms temporal sequence (rather than featural similarity) into connectedness. In the main part of the paper, we present a robot implementation of the scheme. The results show that the proposed network is able to support map behaviour in simple environments.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


Suppression and creation of chaos in a periodically forced Lorenz system.

Franz, MO. Zhang, MH.

Physical Review, E 52, pages: 3558-3565, 1995 (article)

Abstract
Periodic forcing is introduced into the Lorenz model to study the effects of time-dependent forcing on the behavior of the system. Such a nonautonomous system stays dissipative and has a bounded attracting set which all trajectories finally enter. The possible kinds of attracting sets are restricted to periodic orbits and strange attractors. A large-scale survey of parameter space shows that periodic forcing has mainly three effects in the Lorenz system depending on the forcing frequency: (i) Fixed points are replaced by oscillations around them; (ii) resonant periodic orbits are created both in the stable and the chaotic region; (iii) chaos is created in the stable region near the resonance frequency and in periodic windows. A comparison to other studies shows that part of this behavior has been observed in simulations of higher truncations and real world experiments. Since very small modulations can already have a considerable effect, this suggests that periodic processes such as annual or diurnal cycles should not be omitted even in simple climate models.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


A New Method for Constructing Artificial Neural Networks

Vapnik, V., Burges, C., Schölkopf, B.

AT & T Bell Laboratories, 1995 (techreport)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Image segmentation from motion: just the loss of high-spatial-frequency content ?

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

Perception, 24, pages: S19, 1995 (poster)

Abstract
The human contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is bandpass for stimuli of low temporal frequency but, for moving stimuli, results in a low-pass CSF with large high spatial-frequency losses. Thus the high spatial-frequency content of images moving on the retina cannot be seen; motion perception could be facilitated by, or even be based on, the selective loss of high spatial-frequency content. 2-AFC image segmentation experiments were conducted with segmentation based on motion or on form. In the latter condition, the form difference mirrored that produced by moving stimuli. This was accomplished by generating stimulus elements which were spectrally either broadband or low-pass. For the motion used, the spectral difference between static broadband and static low-pass elements matched the spectral difference between moving and static broadband elements. On the hypothesis that segmentation from motion is based on the detection of regions devoid of high spatial-frequencies, both tasks should be similarly difficult for human observers. However, neither image segmentation (nor, incidentally, motion detection) was sensitive to the high spatial-frequency content of the stimuli. Thus changes in perceptual form produced by moving stimuli appear not to be used as a cue for image segmentation.

ei

[BibTex]


Extracting support data for a given task

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Vapnik, V.

In First International Conference on Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining (KDD-95), pages: 252-257, (Editors: UM Fayyad and R Uthurusamy), AAAI Press, Menlo Park, CA, USA, August 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We report a novel possibility for extracting a small subset of a data base which contains all the information necessary to solve a given classification task: using the Support Vector Algorithm to train three different types of handwritten digit classifiers, we observed that these types of classifiers construct their decision surface from strongly overlapping small (k: 4%) subsets of the data base. This finding opens up the possibiiity of compressing data bases significantly by disposing of the data which is not important for the solution of a given task. In addition, we show that the theory allows us to predict the classifier that will have the best generalization ability, based solely on performance on the training set and characteristics of the learning machines. This finding is important for cases where the amount of available data is limited.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


Batting a ball: Dynamics of a rhythmic skill

Sternad, D., Schaal, S., Atkeson, C.

In Studies in Perception and Action, pages: 119-122, (Editors: Bardy, B.;Bostma, R.;Guiard, Y.), Erlbaum, Hillsdayle, NJ, 1995, clmc (inbook)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Memory-based neural networks for robot learning

Atkeson, C., Schaal, S.

Neurocomputing, 9, pages: 1-27, 1995, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper explores a memory-based approach to robot learning, using memory-based neural networks to learn models of the task to be performed. Steinbuch and Taylor presented neural network designs to explicitly store training data and do nearest neighbor lookup in the early 1960s. In this paper their nearest neighbor network is augmented with a local model network, which fits a local model to a set of nearest neighbors. This network design is equivalent to a statistical approach known as locally weighted regression, in which a local model is formed to answer each query, using a weighted regression in which nearby points (similar experiences) are weighted more than distant points (less relevant experiences). We illustrate this approach by describing how it has been used to enable a robot to learn a difficult juggling task. Keywords: memory-based, robot learning, locally weighted regression, nearest neighbor, local models.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


A kendama learning robot based on a dynamic optimization theory

Miyamoto, H., Gandolfo, F., Gomi, H., Schaal, S., Koike, Y., Osu, R., Nakano, E., Kawato, M.

In Preceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Communication (RO-MAN’95), pages: 327-332, Tokyo, July 1995, clmc (inproceedings)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]