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3446 results (BibTeX)

2001


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Overt visual attention for a humanoid robot

Vijayakumar, S., Conradt, J., Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2001), 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of our research is to investigate the interplay between oculomotor control, visual processing, and limb control in humans and primates by exploring the computational issues of these processes with a biologically inspired artificial oculomotor system on an anthropomorphic robot. In this paper, we investigate the computational mechanisms for visual attention in such a system. Stimuli in the environment excite a dynamical neural network that implements a saliency map, i.e., a winner-take-all competition between stimuli while simultenously smoothing out noise and suppressing irrelevant inputs. In real-time, this system computes new targets for the shift of gaze, executed by the head-eye system of the robot. The redundant degrees-of- freedom of the head-eye system are resolved through a learned inverse kinematics with optimization criterion. We also address important issues how to ensure that the coordinate system of the saliency map remains correct after movement of the robot. The presented attention system is built on principled modules and generally applicable for any sensory modality.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

2001


link (url) [BibTex]


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Markovian domain fingerprinting: statistical segmentation of protein sequences

Bejerano, G., Seldin, Y., Margalit, H., Tishby, N.

Bioinformatics, 17(10):927-934, 2001 (article)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Sequence Segmentation by a Mixture of Switching Variable Memory Markov Sources

Seldin, Y., Bejerano, G., Tishby, N.

In In the proceeding of the 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML 2001), pages: 513-520, 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a novel information theoretic algorithm for unsupervised segmentation of sequences into alternating Variable Memory Markov sources. The algorithm is based on competitive learning between Markov models, when implemented as Prediction Suffix Trees (Ron et al., 1996) using the MDL principle. By applying a model clustering procedure, based on rate distortion theory combined with deterministic annealing, we obtain a hierarchical segmentation of sequences between alternating Markov sources. The algorithm seems to be self regulated and automatically avoids over segmentation. The method is applied successfully to unsupervised segmentation of multilingual texts into languages where it is able to infer correctly both the number of languages and the language switching points. When applied to protein sequence families, we demonstrate the method‘s ability to identify biologically meaningful sub-sequences within the proteins, which correspond to important functional sub-units called domains.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Learning inverse kinematics

D’Souza, A., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2001), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, Maui, Hawaii, Oct.29-Nov.3, 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Real-time control of the endeffector of a humanoid robot in external coordinates requires computationally efficient solutions of the inverse kinematics problem. In this context, this paper investigates learning of inverse kinematics for resolved motion rate control (RMRC) employing an optimization criterion to resolve kinematic redundancies. Our learning approach is based on the key observations that learning an inverse of a non uniquely invertible function can be accomplished by augmenting the input representation to the inverse model and by using a spatially localized learning approach. We apply this strategy to inverse kinematics learning and demonstrate how a recently developed statistical learning algorithm, Locally Weighted Projection Regression, allows efficient learning of inverse kinematic mappings in an incremental fashion even when input spaces become rather high dimensional. The resulting performance of the inverse kinematics is comparable to Liegeois ([1]) analytical pseudo inverse with optimization. Our results are illustrated with a 30 degree-of-freedom humanoid robot.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Biomimetic smooth pursuit based on fast learning of the target dynamics

Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2001), 2001, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Following a moving target with a narrow-view foveal vision system is one of the essential oculomotor behaviors of humans and humanoids. This oculomotor behavior, called ``Smooth Pursuit'', requires accurate tracking control which cannot be achieved by a simple visual negative feedback controller due to the significant delays in visual information processing. In this paper, we present a biologically inspired and control theoretically sound smooth pursuit controller consisting of two cascaded subsystems. One is an inverse model controller for the oculomotor system, and the other is a learning controller for the dynamics of the visual target. The latter controller learns how to predict the target's motion in head coordinates such that tracking performance can be improved. We investigate our smooth pursuit system in simulations and experiments on a humanoid robot. By using a fast on-line statistical learning network, our humanoid oculomotor system is able to acquire high performance smooth pursuit after about 5 seconds of learning despite significant processing delays in the syste

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Biomimetic oculomotor control

Shibata, T., Vijayakumar, S., Conradt, J., Schaal, S.

Adaptive Behavior, 9(3/4):189-207, 2001, clmc (article)

Abstract
Oculomotor control in a humanoid robot faces similar problems as biological oculomotor systems, i.e., capturing targets accurately on a very narrow fovea, dealing with large delays in the control system, the stabilization of gaze in face of unknown perturbations of the body, selective attention, and the complexity of stereo vision. In this paper, we suggest control circuits to realize three of the most basic oculomotor behaviors and their integration - the vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflex (VOR-OKR) for gaze stabilization, smooth pursuit for tracking moving objects, and saccades for overt visual attention. Each of these behaviors and the mechanism for their integration was derived with inspiration from computational theories as well as behavioral and physiological data in neuroscience. Our implementations on a humanoid robot demonstrate good performance of the oculomotor behaviors, which proves to be a viable strategy to explore novel control mechanisms for humanoid robotics. Conversely, insights gained from our models have been able to directly influence views and provide new directions for computational neuroscience research.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Regularized principal manifolds

Smola, A., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 1, pages: 179-209, June 2001 (article)

Abstract
Many settings of unsupervised learning can be viewed as quantization problems - the minimization of the expected quantization error subject to some restrictions. This allows the use of tools such as regularization from the theory of (supervised) risk minimization for unsupervised learning. This setting turns out to be closely related to principal curves, the generative topographic map, and robust coding. We explore this connection in two ways: (1) we propose an algorithm for finding principal manifolds that can be regularized in a variety of ways; and (2) we derive uniform convergence bounds and hence bounds on the learning rates of the algorithm. In particular, we give bounds on the covering numbers which allows us to obtain nearly optimal learning rates for certain types of regularization operators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the approach.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Inference Principles and Model Selection

Buhmann, J., Schölkopf, B.

(01301), Dagstuhl Seminar, 2001 (techreport)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Anabolic and Catabolic Gene Expression Pattern Analysis in Normal Versus Osteoarthritic Cartilage Using Complementary DNA-Array Technology

Aigner, T., Zien, A., Gehrsitz, A., Gebhard, P., McKenna, L.

Arthritis and Rheumatism, 44(12):2777-2789, December 2001 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Structure and Functionality of a Designed p53 Dimer.

Davison, TS., Nie, X., Ma, W., Lin, Y., Kay, C., Benchimol, S., Arrowsmith, C.

Journal of Molecular Biology, 307(2):605-617, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
P53 is a homotetrameric tumor suppressor protein involved in transcriptional control of genes that regulate cell proliferation and death. In order to probe the role that oligomerization plays in this capacity, we have previously designed and characterized a series of p53 proteins with altered oligomeric states through hydrophilc substitution of residues Met340 or Leu344 in the normally tetrameric oligomerization domain. Although such mutations have little effect on the overall secondary structural content of the oligomerization domain, both solubility and the resistance to thermal denaturation are substantially reduced relative to that of the wild-type domain. Here, we report the design and characterization of a double-mutant p53 with alterations of residues at positions Met340 and Leu344. The double-mutations Met340Glu/Leu344Lys and Met340Gln/Leu344Arg resulted in distinct dimeric forms of the protein. Furthermore, we have verified by NMR structure determination that the double-mutant Met340Gln/Leu344Arg is essentially a "half-tetramer". Analysis of the in vivo activities of full-length p53 oligomeric mutants reveals that while cell-cycle arrest requires tetrameric p53, transcriptional transactivation activity of monomers and dimers retain roughly background and half of the wild-type activity, respectively.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Kernel-Based Learning Algorithms

Müller, K., Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Tsuda, K., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 12(2):181-201, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
This paper provides an introduction to support vector machines, kernel Fisher discriminant analysis, and kernel principal component analysis, as examples for successful kernel-based learning methods. We first give a short background about Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory and kernel feature spaces and then proceed to kernel based learning in supervised and unsupervised scenarios including practical and algorithmic considerations. We illustrate the usefulness of kernel algorithms by discussing applications such as optical character recognition and DNA analysis

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Estimating the support of a high-dimensional distribution.

Schölkopf, B., Platt, J., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

Neural Computation, 13(7):1443-1471, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
Suppose you are given some data set drawn from an underlying probability distribution P and you want to estimate a “simple” subset S of input space such that the probability that a test point drawn from P lies outside of S equals some a priori specified value between 0 and 1. We propose a method to approach this problem by trying to estimate a function f that is positive on S and negative on the complement. The functional form of f is given by a kernel expansion in terms of a potentially small subset of the training data; it is regularized by controlling the length of the weight vector in an associated feature space. The expansion coefficients are found by solving a quadratic programming problem, which we do by carrying out sequential optimization over pairs of input patterns. We also provide a theoretical analysis of the statistical performance of our algorithm. The algorithm is a natural extension of the support vector algorithm to the case of unlabeled data.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Failure Diagnosis of Discrete Event Systems

Son, HI., Kim, KW., Lee, S.

Journal of Control, Automation and Systems Engineering, 7(5):375-383, May 2001, In Korean (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Centralization: A new method for the normalization of gene expression data

Zien, A., Aigner, T., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, 17, pages: S323-S331, June 2001, Mathematical supplement available at http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/574280.html (article)

Abstract
Microarrays measure values that are approximately proportional to the numbers of copies of different mRNA molecules in samples. Due to technical difficulties, the constant of proportionality between the measured intensities and the numbers of mRNA copies per cell is unknown and may vary for different arrays. Usually, the data are normalized (i.e., array-wise multiplied by appropriate factors) in order to compensate for this effect and to enable informative comparisons between different experiments. Centralization is a new two-step method for the computation of such normalization factors that is both biologically better motivated and more robust than standard approaches. First, for each pair of arrays the quotient of the constants of proportionality is estimated. Second, from the resulting matrix of pairwise quotients an optimally consistent scaling of the samples is computed.

ei

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Machine Based Learning for Multi-View Face Detection and Pose Estimation

Cheng, Y., Fu, Q., Gu, L., Li, S., Schölkopf, B., Zhang, H.

In Proceedings Computer Vision, 2001, Vol. 2, pages: 674-679, IEEE Computer Society, 8th International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), 2001 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Nonlinear blind source separation using kernel feature spaces

Harmeling, S., Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Blankertz, B., Müller, K.

In ICA 2001, pages: 102-107, (Editors: Lee, T.-W. , T.P. Jung, S. Makeig, T. J. Sejnowski), Third International Workshop on Independent Component Analysis and Blind Signal Separation, December 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this work we propose a kernel-based blind source separation (BSS) algorithm that can perform nonlinear BSS for general invertible nonlinearities. For our kTDSEP algorithm we have to go through four steps: (i) adapting to the intrinsic dimension of the data mapped to feature space F, (ii) finding an orthonormal basis of this submanifold, (iii) mapping the data into the subspace of F spanned by this orthonormal basis, and (iv) applying temporal decorrelation BSS (TDSEP) to the mapped data. After demixing we get a number of irrelevant components and the original sources. To find out which ones are the components of interest, we propose a criterion that allows to identify the original sources. The excellent performance of kTDSEP is demonstrated in experiments on nonlinearly mixed speech data.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Occam’s Razor

Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 13, pages: 294-300, (Editors: Leen, T.K. , T.G. Dietterich, V. Tresp), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fourteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), April 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Bayesian paradigm apparently only sometimes gives rise to Occam's Razor; at other times very large models perform well. We give simple examples of both kinds of behaviour. The two views are reconciled when measuring complexity of functions, rather than of the machinery used to implement them. We analyze the complexity of functions for some linear in the parameter models that are equivalent to Gaussian Processes, and always find Occam's Razor at work.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Pattern Selection for ‘Regression’ using the Bias and Variance of Ensemble Network

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Institute of Industrial Engineers Conference, pages: 10-19, Korean Industrial Engineers Conference, November 2001 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Some kernels for structured data

Bartlett, P., Schölkopf, B.

Biowulf Technologies, 2001 (techreport)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Calibration of Digital Amateur Cameras

Urbanek, M., Horaud, R., Sturm, P.

(RR-4214), INRIA Rhone Alpes, Montbonnot, France, July 2001 (techreport)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Modeling the Dynamics of Individual Neurons of the Stomatogastric Networks with Support Vector Machines

Frontzek, T., Gutzen, C., Lal, TN., Heinzel, H-G., Eckmiller, R., Böhm, H.

Abstract Proceedings of the 6th International Congress of Neuroethology (ICN'2001) Bonn, abstract 404, 2001 (poster)

Abstract
In small rhythmic active networks timing of individual neurons is crucial for generating different spatial-temporal motor patterns. Switching of one neuron between different rhythms can cause transition between behavioral modes. In order to understand the dynamics of rhythmically active neurons we analyzed the oscillatory membranpotential of a pacemaker neuron and used different neural network models to predict dynamics of its time series. In a first step we have trained conventional RBF networks and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) using gaussian kernels with intracellulary recordings of the pyloric dilatator neuron in the Australian crayfish, Cherax destructor albidus. As a rule SVMs were able to learn the nonlinear dynamics of pyloric neurons faster (e.g. 15s) than RBF networks (e.g. 309s) under the same hardware conditions. After training SVMs performed a better iterated one-step-ahead prediction of time series in the pyloric dilatator neuron with regard to test error and error sum. The test error decreased with increasing number of support vectors. The best SVM used 196 support vectors and produced a test error of 0.04622 as opposed to the best RBF with 0.07295 using 26 RBF-neurons. In pacemaker neuron PD the timepoint at which the membranpotential will cross threshold for generation of its oscillatory peak is most important for determination of the test error. Interestingly SVMs are especially better in predicting this important part of the membranpotential which is superimposed by various synaptic inputs, which drive the membranpotential to its threshold.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines: Theorie und Anwendung auf Prädiktion epileptischer Anfälle auf der Basis von EEG-Daten

Lal, TN.

Biologische Kybernetik, Institut für Angewandte Mathematik, Universität Bonn, 2001, Advised by Prof. Dr. S. Albeverio (diplomathesis)

ei

ZIP [BibTex]

ZIP [BibTex]

2000


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Stochastic modeling and tracking of human motion

Ormoneit, D., Sidenbladh, H., Black, M. J., Hastie, T.

Learning 2000, Snowbird, UT, April 2000 (conference)

ps

abstract [BibTex]

2000


abstract [BibTex]


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A framework for modeling the appearance of 3D articulated figures

Sidenbladh, H., De la Torre, F., Black, M. J.

In Int. Conf. on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, pages: 368-375, Grenoble, France, March 2000 (inproceedings)

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Functional analysis of human motion data

Ormoneit, D., Hastie, T., Black, M. J.

In In Proc. 5th World Congress of the Bernoulli Society for Probability and Mathematical Statistics and 63rd Annual Meeting of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, Guanajuato, Mexico, May 2000 (inproceedings)

ps

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Stochastic tracking of 3D human figures using 2D image motion

(Winner of the 2010 Koenderink Prize for Fundamental Contributions in Computer Vision)

Sidenbladh, H., Black, M. J., Fleet, D.

In European Conference on Computer Vision, ECCV, pages: 702-718, LNCS 1843, Springer Verlag, Dublin, Ireland, June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A probabilistic method for tracking 3D articulated human figures in monocular image sequences is presented. Within a Bayesian framework, we define a generative model of image appearance, a robust likelihood function based on image gray level differences, and a prior probability distribution over pose and joint angles that models how humans move. The posterior probability distribution over model parameters is represented using a discrete set of samples and is propagated over time using particle filtering. The approach extends previous work on parameterized optical flow estimation to exploit a complex 3D articulated motion model. It also extends previous work on human motion tracking by including a perspective camera model, by modeling limb self occlusion, and by recovering 3D motion from a monocular sequence. The explicit posterior probability distribution represents ambiguities due to image matching, model singularities, and perspective projection. The method relies only on a frame-to-frame assumption of brightness constancy and hence is able to track people under changing viewpoints, in grayscale image sequences, and with complex unknown backgrounds.

ps

pdf code [BibTex]

pdf code [BibTex]


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Robustly estimating changes in image appearance

Black, M. J., Fleet, D. J., Yacoob, Y.

Computer Vision and Image Understanding, 78(1):8-31, 2000 (article)

Abstract
We propose a generalized model of image “appearance change” in which brightness variation over time is represented as a probabilistic mixture of different causes. We define four generative models of appearance change due to (1) object or camera motion; (2) illumination phenomena; (3) specular reflections; and (4) “iconic changes” which are specific to the objects being viewed. These iconic changes include complex occlusion events and changes in the material properties of the objects. We develop a robust statistical framework for recovering these appearance changes in image sequences. This approach generalizes previous work on optical flow to provide a richer description of image events and more reliable estimates of image motion in the presence of shadows and specular reflections.

ps

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl bildschirmfoto 2012 12 06 um 09.22.34
Design and use of linear models for image motion analysis

Fleet, D. J., Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y., Jepson, A. D.

Int. J. of Computer Vision, 36(3):171-193, 2000 (article)

Abstract
Linear parameterized models of optical flow, particularly affine models, have become widespread in image motion analysis. The linear model coefficients are straightforward to estimate, and they provide reliable estimates of the optical flow of smooth surfaces. Here we explore the use of parameterized motion models that represent much more varied and complex motions. Our goals are threefold: to construct linear bases for complex motion phenomena; to estimate the coefficients of these linear models; and to recognize or classify image motions from the estimated coefficients. We consider two broad classes of motions: i) generic “motion features” such as motion discontinuities and moving bars; and ii) non-rigid, object-specific, motions such as the motion of human mouths. For motion features we construct a basis of steerable flow fields that approximate the motion features. For object-specific motions we construct basis flow fields from example motions using principal component analysis. In both cases, the model coefficients can be estimated directly from spatiotemporal image derivatives with a robust, multi-resolution scheme. Finally, we show how these model coefficients can be use to detect and recognize specific motions such as occlusion boundaries and facial expressions.

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Probabilistic detection and tracking of motion boundaries

Black, M. J., Fleet, D. J.

Int. J. of Computer Vision, 38(3):231-245, July 2000 (article)

Abstract
We propose a Bayesian framework for representing and recognizing local image motion in terms of two basic models: translational motion and motion boundaries. Motion boundaries are represented using a non-linear generative model that explicitly encodes the orientation of the boundary, the velocities on either side, the motion of the occluding edge over time, and the appearance/disappearance of pixels at the boundary. We represent the posterior probability distribution over the model parameters given the image data using discrete samples. This distribution is propagated over time using a particle filtering algorithm. To efficiently represent such a high-dimensional space we initialize samples using the responses of a low-level motion discontinuity detector. The formulation and computational model provide a general probabilistic framework for motion estimation with multiple, non-linear, models.

ps

pdf pdf from publisher Video [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher Video [BibTex]


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Knowledge Discovery in Databases: An Information Retrieval Perspective

Ong, CS.

Malaysian Journal of Computer Science, 13(2):54-63, December 2000 (article)

Abstract
The current trend of increasing capabilities in data generation and collection has resulted in an urgent need for data mining applications, also called knowledge discovery in databases. This paper identifies and examines the issues involved in extracting useful grains of knowledge from large amounts of data. It describes a framework to categorise data mining systems. The author also gives an overview of the issues pertaining to data pre processing, as well as various information gathering methodologies and techniques. The paper covers some popular tools such as classification, clustering, and generalisation. A summary of statistical and machine learning techniques used currently is also provided.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Engineering Support Vector Machine Kernels That Recognize Translation Initiation Sites

Zien, A., Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Lengauer, T., Müller, K.

Bioinformatics, 16(9):799-807, September 2000 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: In order to extract protein sequences from nucleotide sequences, it is an important step to recognize points at which regions start that code for proteins. These points are called translation initiation sites (TIS). Results: The task of finding TIS can be modeled as a classification problem. We demonstrate the applicability of support vector machines for this task, and show how to incorporate prior biological knowledge by engineering an appropriate kernel function. With the described techniques the recognition performance can be improved by 26% over leading existing approaches. We provide evidence that existing related methods (e.g. ESTScan) could profit from advanced TIS recognition.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Identification of Drug Target Proteins

Zien, A., Küffner, R., Mevissen, T., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

ERCIM News, 43, pages: 16-17, October 2000 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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The Infinite Gaussian Mixture Model

Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, pages: 554-560, (Editors: Solla, S.A. , T.K. Leen, K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Thirteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In a Bayesian mixture model it is not necessary a priori to limit the number of components to be finite. In this paper an infinite Gaussian mixture model is presented which neatly sidesteps the difficult problem of finding the ``right'' number of mixture components. Inference in the model is done using an efficient parameter-free Markov Chain that relies entirely on Gibbs sampling.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning and Kernel Methods

Schölkopf, B.

In CISM Courses and Lectures, International Centre for Mechanical Sciences Vol.431, CISM Courses and Lectures, International Centre for Mechanical Sciences, 431(23):3-24, (Editors: G Della Riccia and H-J Lenz and R Kruse), Springer, Vienna, Data Fusion and Perception, 2000 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Generalization Abilities of Ensemble Learning Algorithms

Shin, H., Jang, M., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Brain Society Conference, pages: 129-133, Korean Brain Society Conference, June 2000 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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On Designing an Automated Malaysian Stemmer for the Malay Language

Tai, SY., Ong, CS., Abullah, NA.

In Fifth International Workshop on Information Retrieval with Asian Languages, pages: 207-208, ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, Fifth International Workshop on Information Retrieval with Asian Languages, October 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Online and interactive information retrieval systems are likely to play an increasing role in the Malay Language community. To facilitate and automate the process of matching morphological term variants, a stemmer focusing on common affix removal algorithms is proposed as part of the design of an information retrieval system for the Malay Language. Stemming is a morphological process of normalizing word tokens down to their essential roots. The proposed stemmer strips prefixes and suffixes off the word. The experiment conducted with web sites selected from the World Wide Web has exhibited substantial improvements in the number of words indexed.

ei

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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Analysis of Gene Expression Data with Pathway Scores

Zien, A., Küffner, R., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

In ISMB 2000, pages: 407-417, AAAI Press, Menlo Park, CA, USA, 8th International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, August 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a new approach for the evaluation of gene expression data. The basic idea is to generate biologically possible pathways and to score them with respect to gene expression measurements. We suggest sample scoring functions for different problem specifications. The significance of the scores for the investigated pathways is assessed by comparison to a number of scores for random pathways. We show that simple scoring functions can assign statistically significant scores to biologically relevant pathways. This suggests that the combination of appropriate scoring functions with the systematic generation of pathways can be used in order to select the most interesting pathways based on gene expression measurements.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination using periodic pulse trains

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

pages: 74, 3. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2000 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast transduction is essential for understanding spatial vision. Previous research (Wichmann et al. 1998; Wichmann, 1999; Henning and Wichmann, 1999) has demonstrated the importance of high contrasts to distinguish between alternative models of contrast discrimination. However, the modulation transfer function of the eye imposes large contrast losses on stimuli, particularly for stimuli of high spatial frequency, making high retinal contrasts difficult to obtain using sinusoidal gratings. Standard 2AFC contrast discrimination experiments were conducted using periodic pulse trains as stimuli. Given our Mitsubishi display we achieve stimuli with up to 160% contrast at the fundamental frequency. The shape of the threshold versus (pedestal) contrast (TvC) curve using pulse trains shows the characteristic dipper shape, i.e. contrast discrimination is sometimes “easier” than detection. The rising part of the TvC function has the same slope as that measured for contrast discrimination using sinusoidal gratings of the same frequency as the fundamental. Periodic pulse trains offer the possibility to explore the visual system’s properties using high retinal contrasts. Thus they might prove useful in tasks other than contrast discrimination. Second, at least for high spatial frequencies (8 c/deg) it appears that contrast discrimination using sinusoids and periodic pulse trains results in virtually identical TvC functions, indicating a lack of probability summation. Further implications of these results are discussed.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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A brachiating robot controller

Nakanishi, J., Fukuda, T., Koditschek, D. E.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, 16(2):109-123, 2000, clmc (article)

Abstract
We report on our empirical studies of a new controller for a two-link brachiating robot. Motivated by the pendulum-like motion of an apeâ??s brachiation, we encode this task as the output of a â??target dynamical system.â? Numerical simulations indicate that the resulting controller solves a number of brachiation problems that we term the â??ladder,â? â??swing-up,â? and â??ropeâ? problems. Preliminary analysis provides some explanation for this success. The proposed controller is implemented on a physical system in our laboratory. The robot achieves behaviors including â??swing locomotionâ? and â??swing upâ? and is capable of continuous locomotion over several rungs of a ladder. We discuss a number of formal questions whose answers will be required to gain a full understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of this approach.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Real-time robot learning with locally weighted statistical learning

Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G., Vijayakumar, S.

In International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2000), San Francisco, April 2000, 2000, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Locally weighted learning (LWL) is a class of statistical learning techniques that provides useful representations and training algorithms for learning about complex phenomena during autonomous adaptive control of robotic systems. This paper introduces several LWL algorithms that have been tested successfully in real-time learning of complex robot tasks. We discuss two major classes of LWL, memory-based LWL and purely incremental LWL that does not need to remember any data explicitly. In contrast to the traditional beliefs that LWL methods cannot work well in high-dimensional spaces, we provide new algorithms that have been tested in up to 50 dimensional learning problems. The applicability of our LWL algorithms is demonstrated in various robot learning examples, including the learning of devil-sticking, pole-balancing of a humanoid robot arm, and inverse-dynamics learning for a seven degree-of-freedom robot.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Biomimetic gaze stabilization

Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

In Robot learning: an Interdisciplinary approach, pages: 31-52, (Editors: Demiris, J.;Birk, A.), World Scientific, 2000, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
Accurate oculomotor control is one of the essential pre-requisites for successful visuomotor coordination. In this paper, we suggest a biologically inspired control system for learning gaze stabilization with a biomimetic robotic oculomotor system. In a stepwise fashion, we develop a control circuit for the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and the opto-kinetic response (OKR), and add a nonlinear learning network to allow adaptivity. We discuss the parallels and differences of our system with biological oculomotor control and suggest solutions how to deal with nonlinearities and time delays in the control system. In simulation and actual robot studies, we demonstrate that our system can learn gaze stabilization in real time in only a few seconds with high final accuracy.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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New Support Vector Algorithms

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Williamson, R., Bartlett, P.

Neural Computation, 12(5):1207-1245, May 2000 (article)

Abstract
We propose a new class of support vector algorithms for regression and classification. In these algorithms, a parameter {nu} lets one effectively control the number of support vectors. While this can be useful in its own right, the parameterization has the additional benefit of enabling us to eliminate one of the other free parameters of the algorithm: the accuracy parameter {epsilon} in the regression case, and the regularization constant C in the classification case. We describe the algorithms, give some theoretical results concerning the meaning and the choice of {nu}, and report experimental results.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Bounds on Error Expectation for Support Vector Machines

Vapnik, V., Chapelle, O.

Neural Computation, 12(9):2013-2036, 2000 (article)

Abstract
We introduce the concept of span of support vectors (SV) and show that the generalization ability of support vector machines (SVM) depends on this new geometrical concept. We prove that the value of the span is always smaller (and can be much smaller) than the diameter of the smallest sphere containing th e support vectors, used in previous bounds. We also demonstate experimentally that the prediction of the test error given by the span is very accurate and has direct application in model selection (choice of the optimal parameters of the SVM)

ei

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Support vector method for novelty detection

Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R., Smola, A., Shawe-Taylor, J., Platt, J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, pages: 582-588, (Editors: SA Solla and TK Leen and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 13th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Suppose you are given some dataset drawn from an underlying probability distribution ¤ and you want to estimate a “simple” subset ¥ of input space such that the probability that a test point drawn from ¤ lies outside of ¥ equals some a priori specified ¦ between § and ¨. We propose a method to approach this problem by trying to estimate a function © which is positive on ¥ and negative on the complement. The functional form of © is given by a kernel expansion in terms of a potentially small subset of the training data; it is regularized by controlling the length of the weight vector in an associated feature space. We provide a theoretical analysis of the statistical performance of our algorithm. The algorithm is a natural extension of the support vector algorithm to the case of unlabelled data.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Generalization Abilities of Ensemble Learning Algorithms: OLA, Bagging, Boosting

Shin, H., Jang, M., Cho, S., Lee, B., Lim, Y.

In Proc. of the Korea Information Science Conference, pages: 226-228, Conference on Korean Information Science, April 2000 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A simple iterative approach to parameter optimization

Zien, A., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

In RECOMB2000, pages: 318-327, ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, Forth Annual Conference on Research in Computational Molecular Biology, April 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Various bioinformatics problems require optimizing several different properties simultaneously. For example, in the protein threading problem, a linear scoring function combines the values for different properties of possible sequence-to-structure alignments into a single score to allow for unambigous optimization. In this context, an essential question is how each property should be weighted. As the native structures are known for some sequences, the implied partial ordering on optimal alignments may be used to adjust the weights. To resolve the arising interdependence of weights and computed solutions, we propose a novel approach: iterating the computation of solutions (here: threading alignments) given the weights and the estimation of optimal weights of the scoring function given these solutions via a systematic calibration method. We show that this procedure converges to structurally meaningful weights, that also lead to significantly improved performance on comprehensive test data sets as measured in different ways. The latter indicates that the performance of threading can be improved in general.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Solving Satisfiability Problems with Genetic Algorithms

Harmeling, S.

In Genetic Algorithms and Genetic Programming at Stanford 2000, pages: 206-213, (Editors: Koza, J. R.), Stanford Bookstore, Stanford, CA, USA, June 2000 (inbook)

Abstract
We show how to solve hard 3-SAT problems using genetic algorithms. Furthermore, we explore other genetic operators that may be useful to tackle 3-SAT problems, and discuss their pros and cons.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Robust ensemble learning

Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Mika, S., Onoda, T., Müller, K.

In Advances in Large Margin Classifiers, pages: 207-220, Neural Information Processing Series, (Editors: AJ Smola and PJ Bartlett and B Schölkopf and D. Schuurmans), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, October 2000 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Intelligence as a Complex System

Zhou, D.

Biologische Kybernetik, 2000 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Neural Networks in Robot Control

Peters, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany, 2000 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]