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Institute News

Jonas Peters New Member of the German "Young Academy"

  • 13 June 2016

Young, excellent and motivated - Jonas Peters has been elected as one of ten new members to the "Junge Akademie" and will contribute to the interdisciplinary work of this organization. Congratulations!

Jonas Peters


Finalist for WODES 2016 Best Student Paper

  • 01 June 2016

Simon Ebner´s paper on the results of his master thesis

Topic: "Communication rate analysis for event-based state estimation"

Simon Ebner


A special kind of robot workshop (a nice story from last year)

  • 30 May 2016

A Nao flies East and helps Laura Sevilla to teach technology knowledge to children from the Philippines

Fascinated Kids with excited faces and curious voices, expressing happiness and thankfulness...- these emotions were raised by a little NAO robot that was the main actor of a robot workshop that took place in May 2015 in the Philippines. Laura Sevilla, a PostDoc at the MPI for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, took two months off and volunteered more than five weeks in order to organize and lead this workshop.

Laura Sevilla


Switch and stick

  • 18 May 2016

The chemical element gallium could be used as a new reversible adhesive that allows its adhesive effect to be switched on and off with ease

Some adhesives may soon have a metallic sheen and be particularly easy to unstick. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart are suggesting gallium as just such a reversible adhesive. By inducing slight changes in temperature, they can control whether a layer of gallium sticks or not. This is based on the fact that gallium transitions from a solid state to a liquid state at around 30 degrees Celsius. A reversible adhesive of this kind could have applications everywhere that temporary adhesion is required, such as industrial pick-and-place processes, transfer printing, temporary wafer bonding, or for moving sensitive biological samples such as tissues and organs. Switchable adhesion could also be suitable for use on the feet of climbing robots.

Metin Sitti Zhou Ye Guo Zhan Lum Sukho Song


Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-Prize 2016 for Ludovic Righetti

  • 18 May 2016

Medal-Marathon for Robotics Researcher

Tübingen – Stockholm – Berlin – Stockholm – Tübingen; Ludovic Righetti receives within 24 hours two renowned prizes for young researchers for his outstanding science on movements of robots

Ludovic Righetti


Michael J. Black Inducted as Foreign Member of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

  • 13 May 2016

Dr. Black recognized for his leadership in advancing body modeling and computer vision sciences

Body Labs (bodylabs.com), the provider of the world's most advanced technology for analyzing the human body's shape, pose and motion, announced today that Michael J. Black, Body Labs co-founder and board member, will be inducted as a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

Michael Black


Gentle strength for robots

  • 13 March 2016

A soft actuator using electrically controllable membranes could pave the way for machines that are no danger to humans

In interacting with humans, robots must first and foremost be safe. If a household robot, for example, encounters a human, it should not continue its movements regardless, but rather give way in case of doubt. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart are now presenting a motion system - a so-called elastic actuator - that is compliant and can be integrated in robots thanks to its space-saving design. The actuator works with hyperelastic membranes that surround air-filled chambers. The volume of the chambers can be controlled by means of an electric field at the membrane. To date, elastic actuators that exert a force by stretching air-filled chambers have always required connection to pumps and compressors to work. A soft actuator such as the one developed by the Stuttgart-based team means that such bulky payloads or tethers may now be superfluous.

Metin Sitti Lindsey Hines Kirstin Petersen


Cordelia Schmid receives the Humboldt Research Award

  • 19 February 2016

Cordelia Schmid, an Inria research director, has received the Humboldt Research Award for her work on computer vision spanning more than 20 years.

She was nominated for this scientific award by Michael Black, the director of the Perceiving Systems department at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, Germany. As the director of the LEAR team and then the Thoth team since 1 January 2016, Cordelia Schmid is particularly interested in visual recognition linking invariant image descriptors with learning methods. Her research enables a computer to learn not only to interpret all types of real images and videos, but also to recognize objects, actions and places by learning large image and video bases containing more than 100 million images. Cordelia Schmid figures among the world’s precursors and leaders in the field of modern visual recognition methods; she is also named in the “Highly Cited Researchers 2015” list (source: Thomson Reuters).

Michael Black


2016 RAS Early Career Award (Academic)

  • 05 February 2016

for Ludovic Righetti, Group Leader AM Department

recognizing "his contributions to the theory of, and experiments in, robot locomotion and manipulation".

Ludovic Righetti


Roboter machen Schule - Robots set standards

  • 14 January 2016

Autonomous Robots made in Tübingen

Als Haushaltshilfe, Pflegeassistent oder Katastrophenschützer taugen Roboter nur, wenn sie lernfähig sind und zumindest ansatzweise selbstständig handeln können. Stefan Schaal und die Mitarbeiter seiner Abteilung am Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme in Tübingen bringen den Maschinen diese Flexibilität und Autonomie bei.

Stefan Schaal Ludovic Righetti Jeannette Bohg Sebastian Trimpe