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2020


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Sampling on networks: estimating spectral centrality measures and their impact in evaluating other relevant network measures

Ruggeri, N., De Bacco, C.

Applied Network Science, 5:81, October 2020 (article)

Abstract
We perform an extensive analysis of how sampling impacts the estimate of several relevant network measures. In particular, we focus on how a sampling strategy optimized to recover a particular spectral centrality measure impacts other topological quantities. Our goal is on one hand to extend the analysis of the behavior of TCEC [Ruggeri2019], a theoretically-grounded sampling method for eigenvector centrality estimation. On the other hand, to demonstrate more broadly how sampling can impact the estimation of relevant network properties like centrality measures different than the one aimed at optimizing, community structure and node attribute distribution. Finally, we adapt the theoretical framework behind TCEC for the case of PageRank centrality and propose a sampling algorithm aimed at optimizing its estimation. We show that, while the theoretical derivation can be suitably adapted to cover this case, the resulting algorithm suffers of a high computational complexity that requires further approximations compared to the eigenvector centrality case.

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Code Preprint pdf DOI [BibTex]


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Optimal transport for multi-commodity routing on networks

Lonardi, A., Facca, E., Putti, M., De Bacco, C.

October 2020 (article) Submitted

Abstract
We present a model for finding optimal multi-commodity flows on networks based on optimal transport theory. The model relies on solving a dynamical system of equations. We prove that its stationary solution is equivalent to the solution of an optimization problem that generalizes the one-commodity framework. In particular, it generalizes previous results in terms of optimality, scaling, and phase transitions obtained in the one-commodity case. Remarkably, for a suitable range of parameters, the optimal topologies have loops. This is radically different to the one-commodity case, where within an analogous parameter range the optimal topologies are trees. This important result is a consequence of the extension of Kirkchoff's law to the multi-commodity case, which enforces the distinction between fluxes of the different commodities. Our results provide new insights into the nature and properties of optimal network topologies. In particular, they show that loops can arise as a consequence of distinguishing different flow types, and complement previous results where loops, in the one-commodity case, were arising as a consequence of imposing dynamical rules to the sources and sinks or when enforcing robustness to damage. Finally, we provide an efficient implementation for each of the two equivalent numerical frameworks, both of which achieve a computational complexity that is more efficient than that of standard optimization methods based on gradient descent. As a result, our model is not merely abstract but can be efficiently applied to large datasets. We give an example of concrete application by studying the network of the Paris metro.

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Code Preprint [BibTex]


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Community detection with node attributes in multilayer networks

Contisciani, M., Power, E. A., De Bacco, C.

Nature Scientific Reports, 10, pages: 15736, September 2020 (article)

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Code Preprint pdf [BibTex]

Code Preprint pdf [BibTex]


Self-supervised motion deblurring
Self-supervised motion deblurring

Liu, P., Janai, J., Pollefeys, M., Sattler, T., Geiger, A.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 2020 (article)

Abstract
Motion blurry images challenge many computer vision algorithms, e.g., feature detection, motion estimation, or object recognition. Deep convolutional neural networks are state-of-the-art for image deblurring. However, obtaining training data with corresponding sharp and blurry image pairs can be difficult. In this paper, we present a differentiable reblur model for self-supervised motion deblurring, which enables the network to learn from real-world blurry image sequences without relying on sharp images for supervision. Our key insight is that motion cues obtained from consecutive images yield sufficient information to inform the deblurring task. We therefore formulate deblurring as an inverse rendering problem, taking into account the physical image formation process: we first predict two deblurred images from which we estimate the corresponding optical flow. Using these predictions, we re-render the blurred images and minimize the difference with respect to the original blurry inputs. We use both synthetic and real dataset for experimental evaluations. Our experiments demonstrate that self-supervised single image deblurring is really feasible and leads to visually compelling results.

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pdf Project Page Blog [BibTex]

pdf Project Page Blog [BibTex]


Learning Neural Light Transport
Learning Neural Light Transport

Sanzenbacher, P., Mescheder, L., Geiger, A.

Arxiv, 2020 (article)

Abstract
In recent years, deep generative models have gained significance due to their ability to synthesize natural-looking images with applications ranging from virtual reality to data augmentation for training computer vision models. While existing models are able to faithfully learn the image distribution of the training set, they often lack controllability as they operate in 2D pixel space and do not model the physical image formation process. In this work, we investigate the importance of 3D reasoning for photorealistic rendering. We present an approach for learning light transport in static and dynamic 3D scenes using a neural network with the goal of predicting photorealistic images. In contrast to existing approaches that operate in the 2D image domain, our approach reasons in both 3D and 2D space, thus enabling global illumination effects and manipulation of 3D scene geometry. Experimentally, we find that our model is able to produce photorealistic renderings of static and dynamic scenes. Moreover, it compares favorably to baselines which combine path tracing and image denoising at the same computational budget.

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arxiv [BibTex]


HOTA: A Higher Order Metric for Evaluating Multi-Object Tracking
HOTA: A Higher Order Metric for Evaluating Multi-Object Tracking

Luiten, J., Osep, A., Dendorfer, P., Torr, P., Geiger, A., Leal-Taixe, L., Leibe, B.

International Journal of Computer Vision (IJCV), 2020 (article)

Abstract
Multi-Object Tracking (MOT) has been notoriously difficult to evaluate. Previous metrics overemphasize the importance of either detection or association. To address this, we present a novel MOT evaluation metric, HOTA (Higher Order Tracking Accuracy), which explicitly balances the effect of performing accurate detection, association and localization into a single unified metric for comparing trackers. HOTA decomposes into a family of sub-metrics which are able to evaluate each of five basic error types separately, which enables clear analysis of tracking performance. We evaluate the effectiveness of HOTA on the MOTChallenge benchmark, and show that it is able to capture important aspects of MOT performance not previously taken into account by established metrics. Furthermore, we show HOTA scores better align with human visual evaluation of tracking performance.

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Network extraction by routing optimization

Baptista, T. D., Leite, D., Facca, E., Putti, M., De Bacco, C.

Nature Scientific Reports , 10, 2020 (article)

Abstract
Routing optimization is a relevant problem in many contexts. Solving directly this type of optimization problem is often computationally unfeasible. Recent studies suggest that one can instead turn this problem into one of solving a dynamical system of equations, which can instead be solved efficiently using numerical methods. This results in enabling the acquisition of optimal network topologies from a variety of routing problems. However, the actual extraction of the solution in terms of a final network topology relies on numerical details which can prevent an accurate investigation of their topological properties. In this context, theoretical results are fully accessible only to an expert audience and ready-to-use implementations for non-experts are rarely available or insufficiently documented. In particular, in this framework, final graph acquisition is a challenging problem in-and-of-itself. Here we introduce a method to extract networks topologies from dynamical equations related to routing optimization under various parameters’ settings. Our method is made of three steps: first, it extracts an optimal trajectory by solving a dynamical system, then it pre-extracts a network and finally, it filters out potential redundancies. Remarkably, we propose a principled model to address the filtering in the last step, and give a quantitative interpretation in terms of a transport-related cost function. This principled filtering can be applied to more general problems such as network extraction from images, thus going beyond the scenarios envisioned in the first step. Overall, this novel algorithm allows practitioners to easily extract optimal network topologies by combining basic tools from numerical methods, optimization and network theory. Thus, we provide an alternative to manual graph extraction which allows a grounded extraction from a large variety of optimal topologies.

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Code Preprint link (url) DOI [BibTex]

Code Preprint link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2013


Vision meets Robotics: The {KITTI} Dataset
Vision meets Robotics: The KITTI Dataset

Geiger, A., Lenz, P., Stiller, C., Urtasun, R.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 32(11):1231 - 1237 , Sage Publishing, September 2013 (article)

Abstract
We present a novel dataset captured from a VW station wagon for use in mobile robotics and autonomous driving research. In total, we recorded 6 hours of traffic scenarios at 10-100 Hz using a variety of sensor modalities such as high-resolution color and grayscale stereo cameras, a Velodyne 3D laser scanner and a high-precision GPS/IMU inertial navigation system. The scenarios are diverse, capturing real-world traffic situations and range from freeways over rural areas to inner-city scenes with many static and dynamic objects. Our data is calibrated, synchronized and timestamped, and we provide the rectified and raw image sequences. Our dataset also contains object labels in the form of 3D tracklets and we provide online benchmarks for stereo, optical flow, object detection and other tasks. This paper describes our recording platform, the data format and the utilities that we provide.

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pdf DOI [BibTex]

2013


pdf DOI [BibTex]