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2017


Chapter 8 - Micro- and nanorobots in Newtonian and biological viscoelastic fluids
Chapter 8 - Micro- and nanorobots in Newtonian and biological viscoelastic fluids

Palagi, S., (Walker) Schamel, D., Qiu, T., Fischer, P.

In Microbiorobotics, pages: 133 - 162, 8, Micro and Nano Technologies, Second edition, Elsevier, Boston, March 2017 (incollection)

Abstract
Swimming microorganisms are a source of inspiration for small scale robots that are intended to operate in fluidic environments including complex biomedical fluids. Nature has devised swimming strategies that are effective at small scales and at low Reynolds number. These include the rotary corkscrew motion that, for instance, propels a flagellated bacterial cell, as well as the asymmetric beat of appendages that sperm cells or ciliated protozoa use to move through fluids. These mechanisms can overcome the reciprocity that governs the hydrodynamics at small scale. The complex molecular structure of biologically important fluids presents an additional challenge for the effective propulsion of microrobots. In this chapter it is shown how physical and chemical approaches are essential in realizing engineered abiotic micro- and nanorobots that can move in biomedically important environments. Interestingly, we also describe a microswimmer that is effective in biological viscoelastic fluids that does not have a natural analogue.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2017


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Robot Learning

Peters, J., Lee, D., Kober, J., Nguyen-Tuong, D., Bagnell, J., Schaal, S.

In Springer Handbook of Robotics, pages: 357-394, 15, 2nd, (Editors: Siciliano, Bruno and Khatib, Oussama), Springer International Publishing, 2017 (inbook)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Policy Gradient Methods

Peters, J., Bagnell, J.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning and Data Mining, pages: 982-985, 2nd, (Editors: Sammut, Claude and Webb, Geoffrey I.), Springer US, 2017 (inbook)

ei

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Unsupervised clustering of EOG as a viable substitute for optical eye-tracking

Flad, N., Fomina, T., Bülthoff, H. H., Chuang, L. L.

In First Workshop on Eye Tracking and Visualization (ETVIS 2015), pages: 151-167, Mathematics and Visualization, (Editors: Burch, M., Chuang, L., Fisher, B., Schmidt, A., and Weiskopf, D.), Springer, 2017 (inbook)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Statistical Asymmetries Between Cause and Effect

Janzing, D.

In Time in Physics, pages: 129-139, Tutorials, Schools, and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences, (Editors: Renner, Renato and Stupar, Sandra), Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2017 (inbook)

ei

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Robot Learning

Peters, J., Tedrake, R., Roy, N., Morimoto, J.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning and Data Mining, pages: 1106-1109, 2nd, (Editors: Sammut, Claude and Webb, Geoffrey I.), Springer US, 2017 (inbook)

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2015


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Kernel methods in medical imaging

Charpiat, G., Hofmann, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Handbook of Biomedical Imaging, pages: 63-81, 4, (Editors: Paragios, N., Duncan, J. and Ayache, N.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, June 2015 (inbook)

ei

Web link (url) [BibTex]

2015


Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Lernende Roboter

Trimpe, S.

In Jahrbuch der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Max Planck Society, May 2015, (popular science article in German) (inbook)

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Autonomous Robots

Schaal, S.

In Jahrbuch der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, May 2015 (incollection)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Justifying Information-Geometric Causal Inference

Janzing, D., Steudel, B., Shajarisales, N., Schölkopf, B.

In Measures of Complexity: Festschrift for Alexey Chervonenkis, pages: 253-265, 18, (Editors: Vovk, V., Papadopoulos, H. and Gammerman, A.), Springer, 2015 (inbook)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Robot Learning

Peters, J., Lee, D., Kober, J., Nguyen-Tuong, D., Bagnell, J. A., Schaal, S.

In Springer Handbook of Robotics 2nd Edition, pages: 1371-1394, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2015 (incollection)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2009


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Text Clustering with Mixture of von Mises-Fisher Distributions

Sra, S., Banerjee, A., Ghosh, J., Dhillon, I.

In Text mining: classification, clustering, and applications, pages: 121-161, Chapman & Hall/CRC data mining and knowledge discovery series, (Editors: Srivastava, A. N. and Sahami, M.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA, June 2009 (inbook)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2009


Web DOI [BibTex]


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Data Mining for Biologists

Tsuda, K.

In Biological Data Mining in Protein Interaction Networks, pages: 14-27, (Editors: Li, X. and Ng, S.-K.), Medical Information Science Reference, Hershey, PA, USA, May 2009 (inbook)

Abstract
In this tutorial chapter, we review basics about frequent pattern mining algorithms, including itemset mining, association rule mining and graph mining. These algorithms can find frequently appearing substructures in discrete data. They can discover structural motifs, for example, from mutation data, protein structures and chemical compounds. As they have been primarily used for business data, biological applications are not so common yet, but their potential impact would be large. Recent advances in computers including multicore machines and ever increasing memory capacity support the application of such methods to larger datasets. We explain technical aspects of the algorithms, but do not go into details. Current biological applications are summarized and possible future directions are given.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Large Margin Methods for Part of Speech Tagging

Altun, Y.

In Automatic Speech and Speaker Recognition: Large Margin and Kernel Methods, pages: 141-160, (Editors: Keshet, J. and Bengio, S.), Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, USA, January 2009 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Covariate shift and local learning by distribution matching

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Huang, J., Schmittfull, M., Borgwardt, K., Schölkopf, B.

In Dataset Shift in Machine Learning, pages: 131-160, (Editors: Quiñonero-Candela, J., Sugiyama, M., Schwaighofer, A. and Lawrence, N. D.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2009 (inbook)

Abstract
Given sets of observations of training and test data, we consider the problem of re-weighting the training data such that its distribution more closely matches that of the test data. We achieve this goal by matching covariate distributions between training and test sets in a high dimensional feature space (specifically, a reproducing kernel Hilbert space). This approach does not require distribution estimation. Instead, the sample weights are obtained by a simple quadratic programming procedure. We provide a uniform convergence bound on the distance between the reweighted training feature mean and the test feature mean, a transductive bound on the expected loss of an algorithm trained on the reweighted data, and a connection to single class SVMs. While our method is designed to deal with the case of simple covariate shift (in the sense of Chapter ??), we have also found benefits for sample selection bias on the labels. Our correction procedure yields its greatest and most consistent advantages when the learning algorithm returns a classifier/regressor that is simpler" than the data might suggest.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]

2000


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An Introduction to Kernel-Based Learning Algorithms

Müller, K., Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Tsuda, K., Schölkopf, B.

In Handbook of Neural Network Signal Processing, 4, (Editors: Yu Hen Hu and Jang-Neng Hwang), CRC Press, 2000 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

2000


[BibTex]


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Biomimetic gaze stabilization

Shibata, T., Schaal, S.

In Robot learning: an Interdisciplinary approach, pages: 31-52, (Editors: Demiris, J.;Birk, A.), World Scientific, 2000, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
Accurate oculomotor control is one of the essential pre-requisites for successful visuomotor coordination. In this paper, we suggest a biologically inspired control system for learning gaze stabilization with a biomimetic robotic oculomotor system. In a stepwise fashion, we develop a control circuit for the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and the opto-kinetic response (OKR), and add a nonlinear learning network to allow adaptivity. We discuss the parallels and differences of our system with biological oculomotor control and suggest solutions how to deal with nonlinearities and time delays in the control system. In simulation and actual robot studies, we demonstrate that our system can learn gaze stabilization in real time in only a few seconds with high final accuracy.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]