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2017


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Synchronicity Trumps Mischief in Rhythmic Human-Robot Social-Physical Interaction

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the International Symposium on Robotics Research (ISRR), Puerto Varas, Chile, December 2017 (inproceedings) In press

Abstract
Hand-clapping games and other forms of rhythmic social-physical interaction might help foster human-robot teamwork, but the design of such interactions has scarcely been explored. We leveraged our prior work to enable the Rethink Robotics Baxter Research Robot to competently play one-handed tempo-matching hand-clapping games with a human user. To understand how such a robot’s capabilities and behaviors affect user perception, we created four versions of this interaction: the hand clapping could be initiated by either the robot or the human, and the non-initiating partner could be either cooperative, yielding synchronous motion, or mischievously uncooperative. Twenty adults tested two clapping tempos in each of these four interaction modes in a random order, rating every trial on standardized scales. The study results showed that having the robot initiate the interaction gave it a more dominant perceived personality. Despite previous results on the intrigue of misbehaving robots, we found that moving synchronously with the robot almost always made the interaction more enjoyable, less mentally taxing, less physically demanding, and lower effort for users than asynchronous interactions caused by robot or human mischief. Taken together, our results indicate that cooperative rhythmic social-physical interaction has the potential to strengthen human-robot partnerships.

hi

[BibTex]

2017


[BibTex]


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Optimal gamification can help people procrastinate less

Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L.

Annual Meeting of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, Annual Meeting of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, November 2017 (conference)

re

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


A Robotic Framework to Overcome Sensory Overload in Children on the Autism Spectrum: A Pilot Study
A Robotic Framework to Overcome Sensory Overload in Children on the Autism Spectrum: A Pilot Study

Javed, H., Burns, R., Jeon, M., Howard, A., Park, C. H.

In International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) 2017, International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, September 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper discusses a novel framework designed to provide sensory stimulation to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The set up consists of multi-sensory stations to stimulate visual/auditory/olfactory/gustatory/tactile/vestibular senses, together with a robotic agent that navigates through each station responding to the different stimuli. We hypothesize that the robot’s responses will help children learn acceptable ways to respond to stimuli that might otherwise trigger sensory overload. Preliminary results from a pilot study conducted to examine the effectiveness of such a setup were encouraging and are described briefly in this text.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


An Interactive Robotic System for Promoting Social Engagement
An Interactive Robotic System for Promoting Social Engagement

Burns, R., Javed, H., Jeon, M., Howard, A., Park, C. H.

In International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) 2017, International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, September 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This abstract (and poster) is a condensed version of Burns' Master's thesis and related journal article. It discusses the use of imitation via robotic motion learning to improve human-robot interaction. It focuses on the preliminary results from a pilot study of 12 subjects. We hypothesized that the robot's use of imitation will increase the user's openness towards engaging with the robot. Post-imitation, experimental subjects displayed a more positive emotional state, had higher instances of mood contagion towards the robot, and interpreted the robot to have a higher level of autonomy than their control group counterparts. These results point to an increased user interest in engagement fueled by personalized imitation during interaction.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Stiffness Perception during Pinching and Dissection with Teleoperated Haptic Forceps

Ng, C., Zareinia, K., Sun, Q., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), pages: 456-463, Lisbon, Portugal, August 2017 (inproceedings)

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Locomotion of light-driven soft microrobots through a hydrogel via local melting
Locomotion of light-driven soft microrobots through a hydrogel via local melting

Palagi, S., Mark, A. G., Melde, K., Qiu, T., Zeng, H., Parmeggiani, C., Martella, D., Wiersma, D. S., Fischer, P.

In 2017 International Conference on Manipulation, Automation and Robotics at Small Scales (MARSS), pages: 1-5, July 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Soft mobile microrobots whose deformation can be directly controlled by an external field can adapt to move in different environments. This is the case for the light-driven microrobots based on liquid-crystal elastomers (LCEs). Here we show that the soft microrobots can move through an agarose hydrogel by means of light-controlled travelling-wave motions. This is achieved by exploiting the inherent rise of the LCE temperature above the melting temperature of the agarose gel, which facilitates penetration of the microrobot through the hydrogel. The locomotion performance is investigated as a function of the travelling-wave parameters, showing that effective propulsion can be obtained by adapting the generated motion to the specific environmental conditions.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Towards quantifying dynamic human-human physical interactions for robot assisted stroke therapy

Mohan, M., Mendonca, R., Johnson, M. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), London, UK, July 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Human-Robot Interaction is a prominent field of robotics today. Knowledge of human-human physical interaction can prove vital in creating dynamic physical interactions between human and robots. Most of the current work in studying this interaction has been from a haptic perspective. Through this paper, we present metrics that can be used to identify if a physical interaction occurred between two people using kinematics. We present a simple Activity of Daily Living (ADL) task which involves a simple interaction. We show that we can use these metrics to successfully identify interactions.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Design of a Parallel Continuum Manipulator for 6-DOF Fingertip Haptic Display

Young, E. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 599-604, Munich, Germany, June 2017, Finalist for best poster paper (inproceedings)

Abstract
Despite rapid advancements in the field of fingertip haptics, rendering tactile cues with six degrees of freedom (6 DOF) remains an elusive challenge. In this paper, we investigate the potential of displaying fingertip haptic sensations with a 6-DOF parallel continuum manipulator (PCM) that mounts to the user's index finger and moves a contact platform around the fingertip. Compared to traditional mechanisms composed of rigid links and discrete joints, PCMs have the potential to be strong, dexterous, and compact, but they are also more complicated to design. We define the design space of 6-DOF parallel continuum manipulators and outline a process for refining such a device for fingertip haptic applications. Following extensive simulation, we obtain 12 designs that meet our specifications, construct a manually actuated prototype of one such design, and evaluate the simulation's ability to accurately predict the prototype's motion. Finally, we demonstrate the range of deliverable fingertip tactile cues, including a normal force into the finger and shear forces tangent to the finger at three extreme points on the boundary of the fingertip.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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High Magnitude Unidirectional Haptic Force Display Using a Motor/Brake Pair and a Cable

Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 394-399, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Clever electromechanical design is required to make the force feedback delivered by a kinesthetic haptic interface both strong and safe. This paper explores a onedimensional haptic force display that combines a DC motor and a magnetic particle brake on the same shaft. Rather than a rigid linkage, a spooled cable connects the user to the actuators to enable a large workspace, reduce the moving mass, and eliminate the sticky residual force from the brake. This design combines the high torque/power ratio of the brake and the active output capabilities of the motor to provide a wider range of forces than can be achieved with either actuator alone. A prototype of this device was built, its performance was characterized, and it was used to simulate constant force sources and virtual springs and dampers. Compared to the conventional design of using only a motor, the hybrid device can output higher unidirectional forces at the expense of free space feeling less free.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A Stimulus-Response Model Of Therapist-Patient Interactions In Task-Oriented Stroke Therapy Can Guide Robot-Patient Interactions

Johnson, M., Mohan, M., Mendonca, R.

In Proceedings of the Annual Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Conference, New Orleans, USA, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Current robot-patient interactions do not accurately model therapist-patient interactions in task-oriented stroke therapy. We analyzed patient-therapist interactions in task-oriented stroke therapy captured in 8 videos. We developed a model of the interaction between a patient and a therapist that can be overlaid on a stimulus-response paradigm where the therapist and the patient take on a set of acting states or roles and are motivated to move from one role to another when certain physical or verbal stimuli or cues are sensed and received. We examined how the model varies across 8 activities of daily living tasks and map this to a possible model for robot-patient interaction.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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A Wrist-Squeezing Force-Feedback System for Robotic Surgery Training

Brown, J. D., Fernandez, J. N., Cohen, S. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 107-112, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Over time, surgical trainees learn to compensate for the lack of haptic feedback in commercial robotic minimally invasive surgical systems. Incorporating touch cues into robotic surgery training could potentially shorten this learning process if the benefits of haptic feedback were sustained after it is removed. In this paper, we develop a wrist-squeezing haptic feedback system and evaluate whether it holds the potential to train novice da Vinci users to reduce the force they exert on a bimanual inanimate training task. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups according to a multiple baseline experimental design. Each of the ten participants moved a ring along a curved wire nine times while the haptic feedback was conditionally withheld, provided, and withheld again. The realtime tactile feedback of applied force magnitude significantly reduced the integral of the force produced by the da Vinci tools on the task materials, and this result remained even when the haptic feedback was removed. Overall, our findings suggest that wrist-squeezing force feedback can play an essential role in helping novice trainees learn to minimize the force they exert with a surgical robot.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Handling Scan-Time Parameters in Haptic Surface Classification

Burka, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 424-429, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Proton 2: Increasing the Sensitivity and Portability of a Visuo-haptic Surface Interaction Recorder

Burka, A., Rajvanshi, A., Allen, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 439-445, Singapore, May 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Portable Robotic Optical/Tactile ObservatioN PACKage (PROTONPACK, or Proton for short) is a new handheld visuo-haptic sensing system that records surface interactions. We previously demonstrated system calibration and a classification task using external motion tracking. This paper details improvements in surface classification performance and removal of the dependence on external motion tracking, necessary before embarking on our goal of gathering a vast surface interaction dataset. Two experiments were performed to refine data collection parameters. After adjusting the placement and filtering of the Proton's high-bandwidth accelerometers, we recorded interactions between two differently-sized steel tooling ball end-effectors (diameter 6.35 and 9.525 mm) and five surfaces. Using features based on normal force, tangential force, end-effector speed, and contact vibration, we trained multi-class SVMs to classify the surfaces using 50 ms chunks of data from each end-effector. Classification accuracies of 84.5% and 91.5% respectively were achieved on unseen test data, an improvement over prior results. In parallel, we pursued on-board motion tracking, using the Proton's camera and fiducial markers. Motion tracks from the external and onboard trackers agree within 2 mm and 0.01 rad RMS, and the accuracy decreases only slightly to 87.7% when using onboard tracking for the 9.525 mm end-effector. These experiments indicate that the Proton 2 is ready for portable data collection.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Robot Therapist for Assisting in At-Home Rehabilitation of Shoulder Surgery Patients
Robot Therapist for Assisting in At-Home Rehabilitation of Shoulder Surgery Patients

(Recipient of Innovation & Entrepreneurship Prize)

Burns, R., Alborz, M., Chalup, Z., Downen, S., Genuino, K., Nayback, C., Nesbitt, N., Park, C. H.

In 2017 GW Research Days, Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations, April 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The number of middle-aged to elderly patients receiving shoulder surgery is increasing. However, statistically, very few of these patients perform the necessary at-home physical therapy regimen they are prescribed post-surgery. This results in longer recovery times and/or incomplete healing. We propose the use of a robotic therapist, with customized training and encouragement regimens, to increase physical therapy adherence and improve the patient’s recovery experience.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Motion Learning for Emotional Interaction and Imitation of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Motion Learning for Emotional Interaction and Imitation of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

(First place tie in category, "Biomedical Engineering, Graduate Research")

Burns, R., Cowin, S.

In 2017 GW Research Days, Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations, April 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We aim to use motion learning to teach a robot to imitate people's unique gestures. Our robot, ROBOTIS-OP2, can ultimately use imitation to practice social skills with children with autism. In this abstract, two methods of motion learning were compared: Dynamic motion primitives with least squares (DMP with WLS), and Dynamic motion primitives with a Gaussian Mixture Regression (DMP with GMR). Movements with sharp turns were most accurately reproduced using DMP with GMR. Additionally, more states are required to accurately recreate more complex gestures.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Wireless micro-robots for endoscopic applications in urology
Wireless micro-robots for endoscopic applications in urology

Adams, F., Qiu, T., Mark, A. G., Melde, K., Palagi, S., Miernik, A., Fischer, P.

In Eur Urol Suppl, 16(3):e1914, March 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Endoscopy is an essential and common method for both diagnostics and therapy in Urology. Current flexible endoscope is normally cable-driven, thus it is hard to be miniaturized and its reachability is restricted as only one bending section near the tip with one degree of freedom (DoF) is allowed. Recent progresses in micro-robotics offer a unique opportunity for medical inspections in minimally invasive surgery. Micro-robots are active devices that has a feature size smaller than one millimeter and can normally be actuated and controlled wirelessly. Magnetically actuated micro-robots have been demonstrated to propel through biological fluids.Here, we report a novel micro robotic arm, which is actuated wirelessly by ultrasound. It works as a miniaturized endoscope with a side length of ~1 mm, which fits through the 3 Fr. tool channel of a cystoscope, and successfully performs an active cystoscopy in a rabbit bladder.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Roughness perception of virtual textures displayed by electrovibration on touch screens
Roughness perception of virtual textures displayed by electrovibration on touch screens

Vardar, Y., Isleyen, A., Saleem, M. K., Basdogan, C.

In 2017 IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 263-268, 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this study, we have investigated the human roughness perception of periodical textures on an electrostatic display by conducting psychophysical experiments with 10 subjects. To generate virtual textures, we used low frequency unipolar pulse waves in different waveform (sinusoidal, square, saw-tooth, triangle), and spacing. We modulated these waves with a 3kHz high frequency sinusoidal carrier signal to minimize perceptional differences due to the electrical filtering of human finger and eliminate low-frequency distortions. The subjects were asked to rate 40 different macro textures on a Likert scale of 1-7. We also collected the normal and tangential forces acting on the fingers of subjects during the experiment. The results of our user study showed that subjects perceived the square wave as the roughest while they perceived the other waveforms equally rough. The perceived roughness followed an inverted U-shaped curve as a function of groove width, but the peak point shifted to the left compared to the results of the earlier studies. Moreover, we found that the roughness perception of subjects is best correlated with the rate of change of the contact forces rather than themselves.

hi

vardar_whc2017 DOI [BibTex]

vardar_whc2017 DOI [BibTex]


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An automatic method for discovering rational heuristics for risky choice

Lieder, F., Krueger, P. M., Griffiths, T. L.

In Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society, 2017, Falk Lieder and Paul M. Krueger contributed equally to this publication. (inproceedings)

Abstract
What is the optimal way to make a decision given that your time is limited and your cognitive resources are bounded? To answer this question, we formalized the bounded optimal decision process as the solution to a meta-level Markov decision process whose actions are costly computations. We approximated the optimal solution and evaluated its predictions against human choice behavior in the Mouselab paradigm, which is widely used to study decision strategies. Our computational method rediscovered well-known heuristic strategies and the conditions under which they are used, as well as novel heuristics. A Mouselab experiment confirmed our model’s main predictions. These findings are a proof-of-concept that optimal cognitive strategies can be automatically derived as the rational use of finite time and bounded cognitive resources.

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Feeling multiple edges: The tactile perception of short ultrasonic square reductions of the finger-surface friction

Gueorguiev, D., Vezzoli, E., Sednaoui, T., Grisoni, L., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In 2017 IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 125-129, 2017 (inproceedings)

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A reward shaping method for promoting metacognitive learning

Lieder, F., Krueger, P. M., Callaway, F., Griffiths, T. L.

In Proceedings of the Third Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision-Making, 2017 (inproceedings)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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When does bounded-optimal metareasoning favor few cognitive systems?

Milli, S., Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L.

In AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, 31, 2017 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The Structure of Goal Systems Predicts Human Performance

Bourgin, D., Lieder, F., Reichman, D., Talmon, N., Griffiths, T.

In Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, 2017 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning to (mis) allocate control: maltransfer can lead to self-control failure

Bustamante, L., Lieder, F., Musslick, S., Shenhav, A., Cohen, J.

In The 3rd Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making. Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2017 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Mouselab-MDP: A new paradigm for tracing how people plan

Callaway, F., Lieder, F., Krueger, P. M., Griffiths, T. L.

In The 3rd multidisciplinary conference on reinforcement learning and decision making, 2017 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enhancing metacognitive reinforcement learning using reward structures and feedback

Krueger, P. M., Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L.

In Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, 2017 (inproceedings)

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Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Helping people choose subgoals with sparse pseudo rewards

Callaway, F., Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L.

In Proceedings of the Third Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making, 2017 (inproceedings)

re

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2015


3D-printed Soft Microrobot for Swimming in Biological Fluids
3D-printed Soft Microrobot for Swimming in Biological Fluids

Qiu, T., Palagi, S., Fischer, P.

In Conf. Proc. IEEE Eng. Med. Biol. Soc., pages: 4922-4925, August 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Microscopic artificial swimmers hold the potential to enable novel non-invasive medical procedures. In order to ease their translation towards real biomedical applications, simpler designs as well as cheaper yet more reliable materials and fabrication processes should be adopted, provided that the functionality of the microrobots can be kept. A simple single-hinge design could already enable microswimming in non-Newtonian fluids, which most bodily fluids are. Here, we address the fabrication of such single-hinge microrobots with a 3D-printed soft material. Firstly, a finite element model is developed to investigate the deformability of the 3D-printed microstructure under typical values of the actuating magnetic fields. Then the microstructures are fabricated by direct 3D-printing of a soft material and their swimming performances are evaluated. The speeds achieved with the 3D-printed microrobots are comparable to those obtained in previous work with complex fabrication procedures, thus showing great promise for 3D-printed microrobots to be operated in biological fluids.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2015


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Assessing human-human therapy kinematics for retargeting to human-robot therapy

Johnson, M. J., Christopher, S. M., Mohan, M., Mendonca, R.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), Singapore, August 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we present experiments examining the accuracy of data collected from a Kinect sensor for capturing close interactive actions of a therapist with a patient during stroke rehabilitation. Our long-term goal is to map human-human interactions such as these patient-therapist ones onto human-robot interactions. In many robot interaction scenarios, the robot does not mimic interaction between two or more humans, which is a major part of stroke therapy. The Kinect works for functional tasks such as a reaching task where the interaction to be retargeted by the robot is minimal to none; though this data is not good for a functional task involving touching another person. We demonstrate that the noisy data from Kinect does not produce a system robust enough to be for remapping to a humanoid robot a therapit's movements when in contact with a person.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Toward a large-scale visuo-haptic dataset for robotic learning

Burka, A., Hu, S., Krishnan, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Hendricks, L. A., Gao, Y., Darrell, T.

In Proc. CVPR Workshop on the Future of Datasets in Vision, 2015 (inproceedings)

hi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Detecting Lumps in Simulated Tissue via Palpation with a BioTac

Hui, J., Block, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Hui (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Analysis of the Instrument Vibrations and Contact Forces Caused by an Expert Robotic Surgeon Doing FRS Tasks

Brown, J. D., O’Brien, C., Miyasaka, K., Dumon, K. R., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics, pages: 75-76, London, England, June 2015, Poster presentation given by Brown (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Should Haptic Texture Vibrations Respond to User Force and Speed?

Culbertson, H., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In IEEE World Haptics Conference, pages: 106 - 112, Evanston, Illinois, USA, June 2015, Oral presentation given by Culbertson (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enabling the Baxter Robot to Play Hand-Clapping Games

Fitter, N. T., Neuburger, M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, June 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Using IMU Data to Teach a Robot Hand-Clapping Games

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 353-355, April 2015, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Haptic Feedback in Transoral Robotic Surgery: A Feasibility Study

Bur, A. M., Gomez, E. D., Rassekh, C. H., Newman, J. G., Weinstein, G. S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Annual Meeting of the Triological Society at COSM, April 2015, Poster presentation given by Bur (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Human Machine Interface for Dexto Eka: - The humanoid robot

Kumra, S., Mohan, M., Gupta, S., Vaswani, H.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics, Automation, Control and Embedded Systems (RACE), Chennai, India, Febuary 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper illustrates hybrid control system of the humanoid robot, Dexto:Eka: focusing on the dependent or slave mode. Efficiency of any system depends on the fluid operation of its control system. Here, we elucidate the control of 12 DoF robotic arms and an omnidirectional mecanum wheel drive using an exo-frame, and a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a control column. This paper comprises of algorithms, control mechanisms and overall flow of execution for the regulation of robotic arms, graphical user interface and locomotion.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Conception and development of Dexto:Eka: The Humanoid Robot - Part IV

Kumra, S., Mohan, M., Vaswani, H., Gupta, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics, Automation, Control and Embedded Systems (RACE), Febuary 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper elucidates the fourth phase of the development of `Dexto:Eka: - The Humanoid Robot'. It lays special emphasis on the conception of the locomotion drive and the development of vision based system that aids navigation and tele-operation. The first three phases terminated with the completion of two robotic arms with six degrees of freedom each, structural development and the creation of a human machine interface that included an exo-frame, a control column and a graphical user interface. This phase also involved the enhancement of the exo-frame to a vision based system using a Kinect camera. The paper also focuses on the reasons behind choosing the locomotion drive and the benefits it has.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Design and Validation of a Practical Simulator for Transoral Robotic Surgery

Bur, A. M., Gomez, E. D., Chalian, A. A., Newman, J. G., Weinstein, G. S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Society for Robotic Surgery Annual Meeting: Transoral Program, (T8), February 2015, Oral presentation given by Bur (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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When to use which heuristic: A rational solution to the strategy selection problem

Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L.

In Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The human mind appears to be equipped with a toolbox full of cognitive strategies, but how do people decide when to use which strategy? We leverage rational metareasoning to derive a rational solution to this problem and apply it to decision making under uncertainty. The resulting theory reconciles the two poles of the debate about human rationality by proposing that people gradually learn to make rational use of fallible heuristics. We evaluate this theory against empirical data and existing accounts of strategy selection (i.e. SSL and RELACS). Our results suggest that while SSL and RELACS can explain people's ability to adapt to homogeneous environments in which all decision problems are of the same type, rational metareasoning can additionally explain people's ability to adapt to heterogeneous environments and flexibly switch strategies from one decision to the next.

re

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Children and Adults Differ in their Strategies for Social Learning

Lieder, F., Sim, Z. L., Hu, J. C., Griffiths, T. L., Xu, F.

In Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Adults and children rely heavily on other people’s testimony. However, domains of knowledge where there is no consensus on the truth are likely to result in conflicting testimonies. Previous research has demonstrated that in these cases, learners look towards the majority opinion to make decisions. However, it remains unclear how learners evaluate social information, given that considering either the overall valence, or the number of testimonies, or both may lead to different conclusions. We therefore formalized several social learning strategies and compared them to the performance of adults and children. We find that children use different strategies than adults. This suggests that the development of social learning may involve the acquisition of cognitive strategies.

re

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning from others: Adult and child strategies in assessing conflicting ratings

Hu, J., Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L., Xu, F.

In Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 2015 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Utility-weighted sampling in decisions from experience

Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L., Hsu, M.

In The 2nd Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making, 2015 (inproceedings)

re

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2013


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Virtual Robotization of the Human Body via Data-Driven Vibrotactile Feedback

Kurihara, Y., Hachisu, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kajimoto, H.

In Proc. International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology (ACE), 8253, pages: 109-122, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer, Enschede, Netherlands, 2013, Oral presentation given by Kurihara. Best Paper Silver Award (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

2013


[BibTex]


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Governance of Humanoid Robot Using Master Exoskeleton

Kumra, S., Mohan, M., Gupta, S., Vaswani, H.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on Robotics (ISR), Seoul, South Korea, October 2013 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Dexto:Eka: is an adult-size humanoid robot being developed with the aim of achieving tele-presence. The paper sheds light on the control of this robot using a Master Exoskeleton which comprises of an Exo-Frame, a Control Column and a Graphical User Interface. It further illuminates the processes and algorithms that have been utilized to make an efficient system that would effectively emulate a tele-operator.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Virtual Robotization of the Human Body Using Vibration Recording, Modeling and Rendering

Kurihara, Y., Hachisu, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kajimoto, H.

In Proc. Virtual Reality Society of Japan Annual Conference, Osaka, Japan, sep 2013, Paper written in Japanese. Presentation given by Kurihara (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design and development part 2 of Dexto:Eka: - The humanoid robot

Kumra, S., Mohan, M., Gupta, S., Vaswani, H.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Mechatronics and Automation (ICMA), Takamatsu, Japan, August 2013 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Through this paper, we elucidate the second phase of the design and development of the tele-operated humanoid robot Dexto:Eka:. Phase one comprised of the development of a 6 DoF left anthropomorphic arm and left exo-frame. Here, we illustrate the development of the right arm, right exo-frame, torso, backbone, human machine interface and omni-directional locomotion system. Dexto:Eka: will be able to communicate with a remote user through Wi-Fi. An exo-frame capacitates it to emulate human arms and its locomotion is controlled by joystick. A Graphical User Interface monitors and helps in controlling the system.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Virtual Alteration of Body Material by Reality-Based Periodic Vibrotactile Feedback

Kurihara, Y., Hachisu, T., Sato, M., Fukushima, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kajimoto, H.

In Proc. JSME Robotics and Mechatronics Conference (ROBOMEC), Tsukuba, Japan, May 2013, Paper written in Japanese. Poster presentation given by {Kurihara} (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The Design and Field Observation of a Haptic Notification System for Oral Presentations

Tam, D., MacLean, K. E., McGrenere, J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pages: 1689-1698, Paris, France, May 2013, Oral presentation given by Tam (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Using Robotic Exploratory Procedures to Learn the Meaning of Haptic Adjectives

Chu, V., McMahon, I., Riano, L., McDonald, C. G., He, Q., Perez-Tejada, J. M., Arrigo, M., Fitter, N., Nappo, J., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 3048-3055, Karlsruhe, Germany, May 2013, Oral presentation given by Chu. Best Cognitive Robotics Paper Award (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Instrument contact vibrations are a construct-valid measure of technical skill in Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery Training Tasks

Gomez, E. D., Aggarwal, R., McMahan, W., Koch, E., Hashimoto, D. A., Darzi, A., Murayama, K. M., Dumon, K. R., Williams, N. N., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proc. Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education, Orlando, Florida, USA, 2013, Oral presentation given by Gomez (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]