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2000


Probabilistic detection and tracking of motion boundaries
Probabilistic detection and tracking of motion boundaries

Black, M. J., Fleet, D. J.

Int. J. of Computer Vision, 38(3):231-245, July 2000 (article)

Abstract
We propose a Bayesian framework for representing and recognizing local image motion in terms of two basic models: translational motion and motion boundaries. Motion boundaries are represented using a non-linear generative model that explicitly encodes the orientation of the boundary, the velocities on either side, the motion of the occluding edge over time, and the appearance/disappearance of pixels at the boundary. We represent the posterior probability distribution over the model parameters given the image data using discrete samples. This distribution is propagated over time using a particle filtering algorithm. To efficiently represent such a high-dimensional space we initialize samples using the responses of a low-level motion discontinuity detector. The formulation and computational model provide a general probabilistic framework for motion estimation with multiple, non-linear, models.

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pdf pdf from publisher Video [BibTex]

2000


pdf pdf from publisher Video [BibTex]


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Two-dimensional fine particle positioning under an optical microscope using a piezoresistive cantilever as a manipulator

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

journal of Micromechatronics, 1(1):25-48, Brill, 2000 (article)

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[BibTex]


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Investigation of Virtual Reality Interface for AFM-based Nano Manipulation

Horiguchi, S., Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

IEEJ Transactions on Electronics, Information and Systems, 120(12):1948-1956, The Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan, 2000 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Macro to Nano Tele-Manipulation Towards Nanoelectromec hanical Systems

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics, 12(3):209-217, FUJI TECHNOLOGY PRESS LTD., 2000 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Design and use of linear models for image motion analysis
Design and use of linear models for image motion analysis

Fleet, D. J., Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y., Jepson, A. D.

Int. J. of Computer Vision, 36(3):171-193, 2000 (article)

Abstract
Linear parameterized models of optical flow, particularly affine models, have become widespread in image motion analysis. The linear model coefficients are straightforward to estimate, and they provide reliable estimates of the optical flow of smooth surfaces. Here we explore the use of parameterized motion models that represent much more varied and complex motions. Our goals are threefold: to construct linear bases for complex motion phenomena; to estimate the coefficients of these linear models; and to recognize or classify image motions from the estimated coefficients. We consider two broad classes of motions: i) generic “motion features” such as motion discontinuities and moving bars; and ii) non-rigid, object-specific, motions such as the motion of human mouths. For motion features we construct a basis of steerable flow fields that approximate the motion features. For object-specific motions we construct basis flow fields from example motions using principal component analysis. In both cases, the model coefficients can be estimated directly from spatiotemporal image derivatives with a robust, multi-resolution scheme. Finally, we show how these model coefficients can be use to detect and recognize specific motions such as occlusion boundaries and facial expressions.

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Controlled pushing of nanoparticles: modeling and experiments

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

IEEE/ASME transactions on mechatronics, 5(2):199-211, IEEE, 2000 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Robustly estimating changes in image appearance
Robustly estimating changes in image appearance

Black, M. J., Fleet, D. J., Yacoob, Y.

Computer Vision and Image Understanding, 78(1):8-31, 2000 (article)

Abstract
We propose a generalized model of image “appearance change” in which brightness variation over time is represented as a probabilistic mixture of different causes. We define four generative models of appearance change due to (1) object or camera motion; (2) illumination phenomena; (3) specular reflections; and (4) “iconic changes” which are specific to the objects being viewed. These iconic changes include complex occlusion events and changes in the material properties of the objects. We develop a robust statistical framework for recovering these appearance changes in image sequences. This approach generalizes previous work on optical flow to provide a richer description of image events and more reliable estimates of image motion in the presence of shadows and specular reflections.

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pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]