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2016


Skinned multi-person linear model
Skinned multi-person linear model

Black, M.J., Loper, M., Mahmood, N., Pons-Moll, G., Romero, J.

December 2016, Application PCT/EP2016/064610 (misc)

Abstract
The invention comprises a learned model of human body shape and pose dependent shape variation that is more accurate than previous models and is compatible with existing graphics pipelines. Our Skinned Multi-Person Linear model (SMPL) is a skinned vertex based model that accurately represents a wide variety of body shapes in natural human poses. The parameters of the model are learned from data including the rest pose template, blend weights, pose-dependent blend shapes, identity- dependent blend shapes, and a regressor from vertices to joint locations. Unlike previous models, the pose-dependent blend shapes are a linear function of the elements of the pose rotation matrices. This simple formulation enables training the entire model from a relatively large number of aligned 3D meshes of different people in different poses. The invention quantitatively evaluates variants of SMPL using linear or dual- quaternion blend skinning and show that both are more accurate than a Blend SCAPE model trained on the same data. In a further embodiment, the invention realistically models dynamic soft-tissue deformations. Because it is based on blend skinning, SMPL is compatible with existing rendering engines and we make it available for research purposes.

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Google Patents [BibTex]

2016


Google Patents [BibTex]


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Numerical Investigation of Frictional Forces Between a Finger and a Textured Surface During Active Touch

Khojasteh, B., Janko, M., Visell, Y.

Extended abstract presented in form of an oral presentation at the 3rd International Conference on BioTribology (ICoBT), London, England, September 2016 (misc)

Abstract
The biomechanics of the human finger pad has been investigated in relation to motor behaviour and sensory function in the upper limb. While the frictional properties of the finger pad are important for grip and grasp function, recent attention has also been given to the roles played by friction when perceiving a surface via sliding contact. Indeed, the mechanics of sliding contact greatly affect stimuli felt by the finger scanning a surface. Past research has shed light on neural mechanisms of haptic texture perception, but the relation with time-resolved frictional contact interactions is unknown. Current biotribological models cannot predict time-resolved frictional forces felt by a finger as it slides on a rough surface. This constitutes a missing link in understanding the mechanical basis of texture perception. To ameliorate this, we developed a two-dimensional finite element numerical simulation of a human finger pad in sliding contact with a textured surface. Our model captures bulk mechanical properties, including hyperelasticity, dissipation, and tissue heterogeneity, and contact dynamics. To validate it, we utilized a database of measurements that we previously captured with a variety of human fingers and surfaces. By designing the simulations to match the measurements, we evaluated the ability of the FEM model to predict time-resolved sliding frictional forces. We varied surface texture wavelength, sliding speed, and normal forces in the experiments. An analysis of the results indicated that both time- and frequency-domain features of forces produced during finger-surface sliding interactions were reproduced, including many of the phenomena that we observed in analyses of real measurements, including quasiperiodicity, harmonic distortion and spectral decay in the frequency domain, and their dependence on kinetics and surface properties. The results shed light on frictional signatures of surface texture during active touch, and may inform understanding of the role played by friction in texture discrimination.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Behavioral Learning and Imitation for Music-Based Robotic Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Behavioral Learning and Imitation for Music-Based Robotic Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Burns, R., Nizambad, S., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

Workshop paper (5 pages) at the RO-MAN Workshop on Behavior Adaptation, Interaction and Learning for Assistive Robotics, August 2016 (misc)

Abstract
In this full workshop paper, we discuss the positive impacts of robot, music, and imitation therapies on children with autism. We also discuss the use of Laban Motion Analysis (LMA) to identify emotion through movement and posture cues. We present our preliminary studies of the "Five Senses" game that our two robots, Romo the penguin and Darwin Mini, partake in. Using an LMA-focused approach (enabled by our skeletal tracking Kinect algorithm), we find that our participants show increased frequency of movement and speed when the game has a musical accompaniment. Therefore, participants may have increased engagement with our robots and game if music is present. We also begin exploring motion learning for future works.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Design and evaluation of a novel mechanical device to improve hemiparetic gait: a case report

Fjeld, K., Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Vasudevan, E. V.

Extended abstract presented at the Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement Conference (BANCOM), 2016, Poster presentation given by Fjeld (misc)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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One Sensor, Three Displays: A Comparison of Tactile Rendering from a BioTac Sensor

Brown, J. D., Ibrahim, M., Chase, E. D. Z., Pacchierotti, C., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, April 2016 (misc)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Special Issue on Causal Discovery and Inference

Zhang, K., Li, J., Bareinboim, E., Schölkopf, B., Pearl, J.

ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology (TIST), 7(2), January 2016, (Guest Editors) (misc)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Supplemental material for ’Communication Rate Analysis for Event-based State Estimation’

Ebner, S., Trimpe, S.

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, January 2016 (techreport)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Empirical Inference (2010-2015)
Scientific Advisory Board Report, 2016 (misc)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Domain Adaptation in the Wild : Dealing with Asymmetric Label Set

Mittal, A., Raj, A., Namboodiri, V. P., Tuytelaars, T.

2016 (misc)

ei

Arxiv [BibTex]

Arxiv [BibTex]


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Designing Human-Robot Exercise Games for Baxter

Fitter, N. T., Hawkes, D. T., Johnson, M. J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

2016, Late-breaking results report presented at the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) (misc)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


Perceiving Systems (2011-2015)
Perceiving Systems (2011-2015)
Scientific Advisory Board Report, 2016 (misc)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Screening Rules for Convex Problems

Raj, A., Olbrich, J., Gärtner, B., Schölkopf, B., Jaggi, M.

2016 (unpublished) Submitted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Extrapolation and learning equations

Martius, G., Lampert, C. H.

2016, arXiv preprint \url{https://arxiv.org/abs/1610.02995} (misc)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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IMU-Mediated Real-Time Human-Baxter Hand-Clapping Interaction

Fitter, N. T., Huang, Y. E., Mayer, J. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

2016, Late-breaking results report presented at the {\em IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems} (misc)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2008


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Frequent Subgraph Retrieval in Geometric Graph Databases

Nowozin, S., Tsuda, K.

(180), Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, November 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
Discovery of knowledge from geometric graph databases is of particular importance in chemistry and biology, because chemical compounds and proteins are represented as graphs with 3D geometric coordinates. In such applications, scientists are not interested in the statistics of the whole database. Instead they need information about a novel drug candidate or protein at hand, represented as a query graph. We propose a polynomial-delay algorithm for geometric frequent subgraph retrieval. It enumerates all subgraphs of a single given query graph which are frequent geometric epsilon-subgraphs under the entire class of rigid geometric transformations in a database. By using geometric epsilon-subgraphs, we achieve tolerance against variations in geometry. We compare the proposed algorithm to gSpan on chemical compound data, and we show that for a given minimum support the total number of frequent patterns is substantially limited by requiring geometric matching. Although the computation time per pattern is larger than for non-geometric graph mining, the total time is within a reasonable level even for small minimum support.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

2008


PDF [BibTex]


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Simultaneous Implicit Surface Reconstruction and Meshing

Giesen, J., Maier, M., Schölkopf, B.

(179), Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, November 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
We investigate an implicit method to compute a piecewise linear representation of a surface from a set of sample points. As implicit surface functions we use the weighted sum of piecewise linear kernel functions. For such a function we can partition Rd in such a way that these functions are linear on the subsets of the partition. For each subset in the partition we can then compute the zero level set of the function exactly as the intersection of a hyperplane with the subset.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Taxonomy Inference Using Kernel Dependence Measures

Blaschko, M., Gretton, A.

(181), Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, November 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
We introduce a family of unsupervised algorithms, numerical taxonomy clustering, to simultaneously cluster data, and to learn a taxonomy that encodes the relationship between the clusters. The algorithms work by maximizing the dependence between the taxonomy and the original data. The resulting taxonomy is a more informative visualization of complex data than simple clustering; in addition, taking into account the relations between different clusters is shown to substantially improve the quality of the clustering, when compared with state-of-the-art algorithms in the literature (both spectral clustering and a previous dependence maximization approach). We demonstrate our algorithm on image and text data.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Infinite Kernel Learning

Gehler, P., Nowozin, S.

(178), Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, October 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
In this paper we consider the problem of automatically learning the kernel from general kernel classes. Specifically we build upon the Multiple Kernel Learning (MKL) framework and in particular on the work of (Argyriou, Hauser, Micchelli, & Pontil, 2006). We will formulate a Semi-Infinite Program (SIP) to solve the problem and devise a new algorithm to solve it (Infinite Kernel Learning, IKL). The IKL algorithm is applicable to both the finite and infinite case and we find it to be faster and more stable than SimpleMKL (Rakotomamonjy, Bach, Canu, & Grandvalet, 2007) for cases of many kernels. In the second part we present the first large scale comparison of SVMs to MKL on a variety of benchmark datasets, also comparing IKL. The results show two things: a) for many datasets there is no benefit in linearly combining kernels with MKL/IKL instead of the SVM classifier, thus the flexibility of using more than one kernel seems to be of no use, b) on some datasets IKL yields impressive increases in accuracy over SVM/MKL due to the possibility of using a largely increased kernel set. In those cases, IKL remains practical, whereas both cross-validation or standard MKL is infeasible.

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PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


Infinite Kernel Learning
Infinite Kernel Learning

Gehler, P., Nowozin, S.

(178), Max Planck Institute, octomber 2008 (techreport)

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project page pdf [BibTex]

project page pdf [BibTex]


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Large Scale Variational Inference and Experimental Design for Sparse Generalized Linear Models

Seeger, M., Nickisch, H.

(175), Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, September 2008 (techreport)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Block-Iterative Algorithms for Non-Negative Matrix Approximation

Sra, S.

(176), Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, September 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
In this report we present new algorithms for non-negative matrix approximation (NMA), commonly known as the NMF problem. Our methods improve upon the well-known methods of Lee & Seung [19] for both the Frobenius norm as well the Kullback-Leibler divergence versions of the problem. For the latter problem, our results are especially interesting because it seems to have witnessed much lesser algorithmic progress as compared to the Frobenius norm NMA problem. Our algorithms are based on a particular block-iterative acceleration technique for EM, which preserves the multiplicative nature of the updates and also ensures monotonicity. Furthermore, our algorithms also naturally apply to the Bregman-divergence NMA algorithms of Dhillon and Sra [8]. Experimentally, we show that our algorithms outperform the traditional Lee/Seung approach most of the time.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Approximation Algorithms for Bregman Clustering Co-clustering and Tensor Clustering

Sra, S., Jegelka, S., Banerjee, A.

(177), Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, September 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
The Euclidean K-means problem is fundamental to clustering and over the years it has been intensely investigated. More recently, generalizations such as Bregman k-means [8], co-clustering [10], and tensor (multi-way) clustering [40] have also gained prominence. A well-known computational difficulty encountered by these clustering problems is the NP-Hardness of the associated optimization task, and commonly used methods guarantee at most local optimality. Consequently, approximation algorithms of varying degrees of sophistication have been developed, though largely for the basic Euclidean K-means (or `1-norm K-median) problem. In this paper we present approximation algorithms for several Bregman clustering problems by building upon the recent paper of Arthur and Vassilvitskii [5]. Our algorithms obtain objective values within a factor O(logK) for Bregman k-means, Bregman co-clustering, Bregman tensor clustering, and weighted kernel k-means. To our knowledge, except for some special cases, approximation algorithms have not been considered for these general clustering problems. There are several important implications of our work: (i) under the same assumptions as Ackermann et al. [1] it yields a much faster algorithm (non-exponential in K, unlike [1]) for information-theoretic clustering, (ii) it answers several open problems posed by [4], including generalizations to Bregman co-clustering, and tensor clustering, (iii) it provides practical and easy to implement methods—in contrast to several other common approximation approaches.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Combining Appearance and Motion for Human Action Classification in Videos

Dhillon, P., Nowozin, S., Lampert, C.

(174), Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, August 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
We study the question of activity classification in videos and present a novel approach for recognizing human action categories in videos by combining information from appearance and motion of human body parts. Our approach uses a tracking step which involves Particle Filtering and a local non - parametric clustering step. The motion information is provided by the trajectory of the cluster modes of a local set of particles. The statistical information about the particles of that cluster over a number of frames provides the appearance information. Later we use a “Bag ofWords” model to build one histogram per video sequence from the set of these robust appearance and motion descriptors. These histograms provide us characteristic information which helps us to discriminate among various human actions and thus classify them correctly. We tested our approach on the standard KTH and Weizmann human action datasets and the results were comparable to the state of the art. Additionally our approach is able to distinguish between activities that involve the motion of complete body from those in which only certain body parts move. In other words, our method discriminates well between activities with “gross motion” like running, jogging etc. and “local motion” like waving, boxing etc.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Example-based Learning for Single-image Super-resolution and JPEG Artifact Removal

Kim, K., Kwon, Y.

(173), Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, August 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
This paper proposes a framework for single-image super-resolution and JPEG artifact removal. The underlying idea is to learn a map from input low-quality images (suitably preprocessed low-resolution or JPEG encoded images) to target high-quality images based on example pairs of input and output images. To retain the complexity of the resulting learning problem at a moderate level, a patch-based approach is taken such that kernel ridge regression (KRR) scans the input image with a small window (patch) and produces a patchvalued output for each output pixel location. These constitute a set of candidate images each of which reflects different local information. An image output is then obtained as a convex combination of candidates for each pixel based on estimated confidences of candidates. To reduce the time complexity of training and testing for KRR, a sparse solution is found by combining the ideas of kernel matching pursuit and gradient descent. As a regularized solution, KRR leads to a better generalization than simply storing the examples as it has been done in existing example-based super-resolution algorithms and results in much less noisy images. However, this may introduce blurring and ringing artifacts around major edges as sharp changes are penalized severely. A prior model of a generic image class which takes into account the discontinuity property of images is adopted to resolve this problem. Comparison with existing super-resolution and JPEG artifact removal methods shows the effectiveness of the proposed method. Furthermore, the proposed method is generic in that it has the potential to be applied to many other image enhancement applications.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Bayesian Time-series Segmentation based on Linear Gaussian State-space Models

Chiappa, S.

(171), Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, June 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
Unsupervised time-series segmentation in the general scenario in which the number of segment-types and segment boundaries are a priori unknown is a fundamental problem in many applications and requires an accurate segmentation model as well as a way of determining an appropriate number of segment-types. In most approaches, segmentation and determination of number of segment-types are addressed in two separate steps, since the segmentation model assumes a predefined number of segment-types. The determination of number of segment-types is thus achieved by training and comparing several separate models. In this paper, we take a Bayesian approach to a segmentation model based on linear Gaussian state-space models to achieve structure selection within the model. An appropriate prior distribution on the parameters is used to enforce a sparse parametrization, such that the model automatically selects the smallest number of underlying dynamical systems that explain the data well and a parsimonious structure for each dynamical system. As the resulting model is computationally intractable, we introduce a variational approximation, in which a reformulation of the problem enables to use an efficient inference algorithm.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A New Non-monotonic Gradient Projection Method for the Non-negative Least Squares Problem

Kim, D., Sra, S., Dhillon, I.

(TR-08-28), University of Texas, Austin, TX, USA, June 2008 (techreport)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Non-monotonic Poisson Likelihood Maximization

Sra, S., Kim, D., Schölkopf, B.

(170), Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, June 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
This report summarizes the theory and some main applications of a new non-monotonic algorithm for maximizing a Poisson Likelihood, which for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is equivalent to minimizing the associated Kullback-Leibler Divergence, and for Transmission Tomography is similar to maximizing the dual of a maximum entropy problem. We call our method non-monotonic maximum likelihood (NMML) and show its application to different problems such as tomography and image restoration. We discuss some theoretical properties such as convergence for our algorithm. Our experimental results indicate that speedups obtained via our non-monotonic methods are substantial.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A Kernel Method for the Two-sample Problem

Gretton, A., Borgwardt, K., Rasch, M., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

(157), Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics Tübingen, April 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
We propose a framework for analyzing and comparing distributions, allowing us to design statistical tests to determine if two samples are drawn from different distributions. Our test statistic is the largest difference in expectations over functions in the unit ball of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). We present two tests based on large deviation bounds for the test statistic, while a third is based on the asymptotic distribution of this statistic. The test statistic can be computed in quadratic time, although efficient linear time approximations are available. Several classical metrics on distributions are recovered when the function space used to compute the difference in expectations is allowed to be more general (eg.~a Banach space). We apply our two-sample tests to a variety of problems, including attribute matching for databases using the Hungarian marriage method, where they perform strongly. Excellent performance is also obtained when comparing distributions over graphs, for which these are the first such tests.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The Touch Thimble

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Ferguson, D., Kutzer, M., Moses, M., Okamura, A. M.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, Reno, Nevada, USA, March 2008 (misc)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Energy Functionals for Manifold-valued Mappings and Their Properties

Hein, M., Steinke, F., Schölkopf, B.

(167), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, January 2008 (techreport)

Abstract
This technical report is merely an extended version of the appendix of Steinke et.al. "Manifold-valued Thin-Plate Splines with Applications in Computer Graphics" (2008) with complete proofs, which had to be omitted due to space restrictions. This technical report requires a basic knowledge of differential geometry. However, apart from that requirement the technical report is self-contained.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Biologically Inspired Polymer Micro-Patterned Adhesives

Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

EDGEWOOD CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL CENTER ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MD, 2008 (techreport)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Incremental nonparametric {Bayesian} regression
Incremental nonparametric Bayesian regression

Wood, F., Grollman, D. H., Heller, K. A., Jenkins, O. C., Black, M. J.

(CS-08-07), Brown University, Department of Computer Science, 2008 (techreport)

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Efficient inverse kinematics algorithms for highdimensional movement systems

Tevatia, G., Schaal, S.

CLMC Technical Report: TR-CLMC-2008-1, 2008, clmc (techreport)

Abstract
Real-time control of the endeffector of a humanoid robot in external coordinates requires computationally efficient solutions of the inverse kinematics problem. In this context, this paper investigates methods of resolved motion rate control (RMRC) that employ optimization criteria to resolve kinematic redundancies. In particular we focus on two established techniques, the pseudo inverse with explicit optimization and the extended Jacobian method. We prove that the extended Jacobian method includes pseudo-inverse methods as a special solution. In terms of computational complexity, however, pseudo-inverse and extended Jacobian differ significantly in favor of pseudo-inverse methods. Employing numerical estimation techniques, we introduce a computationally efficient version of the extended Jacobian with performance comparable to the original version. Our results are illustrated in simulation studies with a multiple degree-offreedom robot, and were evaluated on an actual 30 degree-of-freedom full-body humanoid robot.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]