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2018


Impact of Trunk Orientation  for Dynamic Bipedal Locomotion
Impact of Trunk Orientation for Dynamic Bipedal Locomotion

Drama, Ö.

Dynamic Walking Conference, May 2018 (talk)

Abstract
Impact of trunk orientation for dynamic bipedal locomotion My research revolves around investigating the functional demands of bipedal running, with focus on stabilizing trunk orientation. When we think about postural stability, there are two critical questions we need to answer: What are the necessary and sufficient conditions to achieve and maintain trunk stability? I am concentrating on how morphology affects control strategies in achieving trunk stability. In particular, I denote the trunk pitch as the predominant morphology parameter and explore the requirements it imposes on a chosen control strategy. To analyze this, I use a spring loaded inverted pendulum model extended with a rigid trunk, which is actuated by a hip motor. The challenge for the controller design here is to have a single hip actuator to achieve two coupled tasks of moving the legs to generate motion and stabilizing the trunk. I enforce orthograde and pronograde postures and aim to identify the effect of these trunk orientations on the hip torque and ground reaction profiles for different control strategies.

dlg

Impact of trunk orientation for dynamic bipedal locomotion [DW 2018] link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Poster Abstract: Toward Fast Closed-loop Control over Multi-hop Low-power Wireless Networks

Mager, F., Baumann, D., Trimpe, S., Zimmerling, M.

Proceedings of the 17th ACM/IEEE Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN), pages: 158-159, Porto, Portugal, April 2018 (poster)

ics

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Representation of sensory uncertainty in macaque visual cortex

Goris, R., Henaff, O., Meding, K.

Computational and Systems Neuroscience (COSYNE) 2018, March 2018 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Method and device for reversibly attaching a phase changing metal to an object
Method and device for reversibly attaching a phase changing metal to an object

Zhou Ye, G. Z. L. M. S.

US Patent Application US 2018/0021892 A1, January 2018 (patent)

Abstract
A method for reversibly attaching a phase changing metal to an object, the method comprising the steps of: providing a substrate having at least one surface at which the phase changing metal is attached, heating the phase changing metal above a phase changing temperature at which the phase changing metal changes its phase from solid to liquid, bringing the phase changing metal, when the phase changing metal is in the liquid phase or before the phase changing metal is brought into the liquid phase, into contact with the object, permitting the phase changing metal to cool below the phase changing temperature, whereby the phase changing metal becomes solid and the object and the phase changing metal become attached to each other, reheating the phase changing metal above the phase changing temperature to liquefy the phase changing metal, and removing the substrate from the object, with the phase changing metal separating from the object and remaining with the substrate.

pi

US Patent Application Database US Patent Application (PDF) [BibTex]


Method of fabricating a shape-changeable magentic member, method of producing a shape changeable magnetic member and shape changeable magnetic member
Method of fabricating a shape-changeable magentic member, method of producing a shape changeable magnetic member and shape changeable magnetic member

Guo Zhan Lum, Z. Y. M. S.

US Patent Application US 2018/0012693 A1, January 2018 (patent)

Abstract
The present invention relates to a method of fabricating a shape-changeable magnetic member comprising a plurality of segments with each segment being able to be magnetized with a desired magnitude and orientation of magnetization, to a method of producing a shape changeable magnetic member composed of a plurality of segments and to a shape changeable magnetic member.

pi

US Patent Application Database US Patent Application (PDF) [BibTex]


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Generalized phase locking analysis of electrophysiology data

Safavi, S., Panagiotaropoulos, T., Kapoor, V., Logothetis, N. K., Besserve, M.

7th AREADNE Conference on Research in Encoding and Decoding of Neural Ensembles, 2018 (poster)

ei

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Photorealistic Video Super Resolution

Pérez-Pellitero, E., Sajjadi, M. S. M., Hirsch, M., Schölkopf, B.

Workshop and Challenge on Perceptual Image Restoration and Manipulation (PIRM) at the 15th European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV), 2018 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Retinal image quality of the human eye across the visual field

Meding, K., Hirsch, M., Wichmann, F. A.

14th Biannual Conference of the German Society for Cognitive Science (KOGWIS 2018), 2018 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Nanorobots propel through the eye

Zhiguang Wu, J. T. H. J. Q. W. M. S. F. Z. Z. W. M. D. S. S. T. Q. P. F.

Max Planck Society, 2018 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart developed specially coated nanometer-sized robots that could be moved actively through dense tissue like the vitreous of the eye. So far, the transport of such nano-vehicles has only been demonstrated in model systems or biological fluids, but not in real tissue. Our work constitutes one step further towards nanorobots becoming minimally-invasive tools for precisely delivering medicine to where it is needed.

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link (url) [BibTex]

2017


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Improving performance of linear field generation with multi-coil setup by optimizing coils position

Aghaeifar, A., Loktyushin, A., Eschelbach, M., Scheffler, K.

Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine, 30(Supplement 1):S259, 34th Annual Scientific Meeting of the European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ESMRMB), October 2017 (poster)

ei

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2017


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Estimating B0 inhomogeneities with projection FID navigator readouts

Loktyushin, A., Ehses, P., Schölkopf, B., Scheffler, K.

25th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM), April 2017 (poster)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Image Quality Improvement by Applying Retrospective Motion Correction on Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping and R2*

Feng, X., Loktyushin, A., Deistung, A., Reichenbach, J.

25th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM), April 2017 (poster)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Computing with Uncertainty

Hennig, P.

2017 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Machine learning requires computer hardware to reliable and efficiently compute estimations for ever more complex and fundamentally incomputable quantities. A research team at MPI for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen develops new algorithms which purposely lower the precision of computations and return an explicit measure of uncertainty over the correct result alongside the estimate. Doing so allows for more flexible management of resources, and increases the reliability of intelligent systems.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Biomechanics and Locomotion Control in Legged Animals and Legged Robots

Sproewitz, A., Heim, S.

2017 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
An animal's running gait is dynamic, efficient, elegant, and adaptive. We see locomotion in animals as an orchestrated interplay of the locomotion apparatus, interacting with its environment. The Dynamic Locomotion Group at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart develops novel legged robots to decipher aspects of biomechanics and neuromuscular control of legged locomotion in animals, and to understand general principles of locomotion.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Methods, apparatuses, and systems for micromanipulation with adhesive fibrillar structures
Methods, apparatuses, and systems for micromanipulation with adhesive fibrillar structures

Sitti, M., Mengüç, Y.

US Patent 9,731,422, 2017 (patent)

Abstract
The present invention are methods for fabrication of micro- and/or nano-scale adhesive fibers and their use for movement and manipulation of objects. Further disclosed is a method of manipulating a part by providing a manipulation device with a plurality of fibers, where each fiber has a tip with a flat surface that is parallel to a backing layer, contacting the flat surfaces on an object, moving the object to a new location, then disengaging the tips from the object.

pi

link (url) [BibTex]


Design of a visualization scheme for functional connectivity data of Human Brain
Design of a visualization scheme for functional connectivity data of Human Brain

Bramlage, L.

Hochschule Osnabrück - University of Applied Sciences, 2017 (thesis)

sf

Bramlage_BSc_2017.pdf [BibTex]


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Generalized phase locking analysis of electrophysiology data

Safavi, S., Panagiotaropoulos, T., Kapoor, V., Logothetis, N. K., Besserve, M.

ESI Systems Neuroscience Conference (ESI-SyNC 2017): Principles of Structural and Functional Connectivity, 2017 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Diversity of sharp wave-ripples in the CA1 of the macaque hippocampus and their brain wide signatures

Ramirez-Villegas, J. F., Logothetis, N. K., Besserve, M.

45th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2015), October 2015 (poster)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Proceedings of the 37th German Conference on Pattern Recognition
Proceedings of the 37th German Conference on Pattern Recognition

Gall, J., Gehler, P., Leibe, B.

Springer, German Conference on Pattern Recognition, October 2015 (proceedings)

ps

GCPR conference website [BibTex]

GCPR conference website [BibTex]


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Causal Inference for Empirical Time Series Based on the Postulate of Independence of Cause and Mechanism

Besserve, M.

53rd Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2015 (talk)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Methods of forming dry adhesive structures
Methods of forming dry adhesive structures

Sitti, M., Murphy, M., Aksak, B.

September 2015, US Patent 9,120,953 (patent)

Abstract
Methods of forming dry adhesives including a method of making a dry adhesive including applying a liquid polymer to the second end of the stem, molding the liquid polymer on the stem in a mold, wherein the mold includes a recess having a cross-sectional area that is less than a cross-sectional area of the second end of the stem, curing the liquid polymer in the mold to form a tip at the second end of the stem, wherein the tip includes a second layer stem; corresponding to the recess in the mold, and removing the tip from the mold after the liquid polymer cures.

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Micro-fiber arrays with tip coating and transfer method for preparing same
Micro-fiber arrays with tip coating and transfer method for preparing same

Sitti, M., Washburn, N. R., Glass, P. S., Chung, H.

July 2015, US Patent 9,079,215 (patent)

Abstract
Present invention describes a patterned and coated micro- and nano-scale fibers elastomeric material for enhanced adhesion in wet or dry environments. A multi-step fabrication process including optical lithography, micromolding, polymer synthesis, dipping, stamping, and photopolymerization is described to produce uniform arrays of micron-scale fibers with mushroom-shaped tips coated with a thin layer of an intrinsically adhesive synthetic polymer, such as lightly crosslinked p(DMA-co-MEA).

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Retrospective rigid motion correction of undersampled MRI data

Loktyushin, A., Babayeva, M., Gallichan, D., Krueger, G., Scheffler, K., Kober, T.

23rd Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISMRM, June 2015 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Improving Quantitative Susceptibility and R2* Mapping by Applying Retrospective Motion Correction

Feng, X., Loktyushin, A., Deistung, A., Reichenbach, J. R.

23rd Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISMRM, June 2015 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Independence of cause and mechanism in brain networks

Besserve, M.

DALI workshop on Networks: Processes and Causality, April 2015 (talk)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Dry adhesives and methods for making dry adhesives
Dry adhesives and methods for making dry adhesives

Sitti, M., Murphy, M., Aksak, B.

March 2015, US Patent App. 14/625,162 (patent)

Abstract
Dry adhesives and methods for forming dry adhesives. A method of forming a dry adhesive structure on a substrate, comprises: forming a template backing layer of energy sensitive material on the substrate; forming a template layer of energy sensitive material on the template backing layer; exposing the template layer to a predetermined pattern of energy; removing a portion of the template layer related to the predetermined pattern of energy, and leaving a template structure formed from energy sensitive material and connected to the substrate via the template backing layer.

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Increasing the sensitivity of Kepler to Earth-like exoplanets

Foreman-Mackey, D., Hogg, D., Schölkopf, B., Wang, D.

Workshop: 225th American Astronomical Society Meeting 2015 , pages: 105.01D, 2015 (poster)

ei

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Information-Theoretic Implications of Classical and Quantum Causal Structures

Chaves, R., Majenz, C., Luft, L., Maciel, T., Janzing, D., Schölkopf, B., Gross, D.

18th Conference on Quantum Information Processing (QIP), 2015 (talk)

ei

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Calibrating the pixel-level Kepler imaging data with a causal data-driven model

Wang, D., Foreman-Mackey, D., Hogg, D., Schölkopf, B.

Workshop: 225th American Astronomical Society Meeting 2015 , pages: 258.08, 2015 (poster)

ei

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning robots

Trimpe, S.

2015 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
An exploded power plant, collapsed buildings after an earthquake, a burning vehicle loaded with hazardous goods – all of these are dangerous situations for human emergency responders. What if we could send robots instead of humans? Researchers at the Autonomous Motion Department work on fundamental principles required to build intelligent robots which one day can help us in dangerous situations. A key requirement for making this happen is that robots must be enabled to learn.

link (url) [BibTex]


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Disparity estimation from a generative light field model

Köhler, R., Schölkopf, B., Hirsch, M.

IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV 2015), Workshop on Inverse Rendering, 2015, Note: This work has been presented as a poster and is not included in the workshop proceedings. (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The search for single exoplanet transits in the Kepler light curves

Foreman-Mackey, D., Hogg, D. W., Schölkopf, B.

IAU General Assembly, 22, pages: 2258352, 2015 (talk)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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The smallest human-made nano-motor

Sánchez, Samuel

2015 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Tiny self-propelled motors which speed through the water and clean up pollutions along the way or small robots which can swim effortlessly through blood to one day transport medication to a certain part of the body – this sounds like taken from a science fiction movie script. However, Samuel Sánchez is already hard at work in his lab at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart to make these visions come true. Self-propelled micro-nanorobots and the usage as integrated sensors in microfluid-chips: that’s the topic of Sánchez` research group.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

2004


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Discrete vs. Continuous: Two Sides of Machine Learning

Zhou, D.

October 2004 (talk)

Abstract
We consider the problem of transductive inference. In many real-world problems, unlabeled data is far easier to obtain than labeled data. Hence transductive inference is very significant in many practical problems. According to Vapnik's point of view, one should predict the function value only on the given points directly rather than a function defined on the whole space, the latter being a more complicated problem. Inspired by this idea, we develop discrete calculus on finite discrete spaces, and then build discrete regularization. A family of transductive algorithms is naturally derived from this regularization framework. We validate the algorithms on both synthetic and real-world data from text/web categorization to bioinformatics problems. A significant by-product of this work is a powerful way of ranking data based on examples including images, documents, proteins and many other kinds of data. This talk is mainly based on the followiing contribution: (1) D. Zhou and B. Sch{\"o}lkopf: Transductive Inference with Graphs, MPI Technical report, August, 2004; (2) D. Zhou, B. Sch{\"o}lkopf and T. Hofmann. Semi-supervised Learning on Directed Graphs. NIPS 2004; (3) D. Zhou, O. Bousquet, T.N. Lal, J. Weston and B. Sch{\"o}lkopf. Learning with Local and Global Consistency. NIPS 2003.

ei

PDF [BibTex]


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S-cones contribute to flicker brightness in human vision

Wehrhahn, C., Hill, NJ., Dillenburger, B.

34(174.12), 34th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), October 2004 (poster)

Abstract
In the retina of primates three cone types sensitive to short, middle and long wavelengths of light convert photons into electrical signals. Many investigators have presented evidence that, in color normal observers, the signals of cones sensitive to short wavelengths of light (S-cones) do not contribute to the perception of brightness of a colored surface when this is alternated with an achromatic reference (flicker brightness). Other studies indicate that humans do use S-cone signals when performing this task. Common to all these studies is the small number of observers, whose performance data are reported. Considerable variability in the occurrence of cone types across observers has been found, but, to our knowledge, no cone counts exist from larger populations of humans. We reinvestigated how much the S-cones contribute to flicker brightness. 76 color normal observers were tested in a simple psychophysical procedure neutral to the cone type occurence (Teufel & Wehrhahn (2000), JOSA A 17: 994 - 1006). The data show that, in the majority of our observers, S-cones provide input with a negative sign - relative to L- and M-cone contribution - in the task in question. There is indeed considerable between-subject variability such that for 20 out of 76 observers the magnitude of this input does not differ significantly from 0. Finally, we argue that the sign of S-cone contribution to flicker brightness perception by an observer cannot be used to infer the relative sign their contributions to the neuronal signals carrying the information leading to the perception of flicker brightness. We conclude that studies which use only a small number of observers may easily fail to find significant evidence for the small but significant population tendency for the S-cones to contribute to flicker brightness. Our results confirm all earlier results and reconcile their contradictory interpretations.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Grundlagen von Support Vector Maschinen und Anwendungen in der Bildverarbeitung

Eichhorn, J.

September 2004 (talk)

Abstract
Invited talk at the workshop "Numerical, Statistical and Discrete Methods in Image Processing" at the TU M{\"u}nchen (in GERMAN)

ei

PDF [BibTex]


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Advanced Lectures on Machine Learning

Bousquet, O., von Luxburg, U., Rätsch, G.

ML Summer Schools 2003, LNAI 3176, pages: 240, Springer, Berlin, Germany, ML Summer Schools, September 2004 (proceedings)

Abstract
Machine Learning has become a key enabling technology for many engineering applications, investigating scientific questions and theoretical problems alike. To stimulate discussions and to disseminate new results, a summer school series was started in February 2002, the documentation of which is published as LNAI 2600. This book presents revised lectures of two subsequent summer schools held in 2003 in Canberra, Australia, and in T{\"u}bingen, Germany. The tutorial lectures included are devoted to statistical learning theory, unsupervised learning, Bayesian inference, and applications in pattern recognition; they provide in-depth overviews of exciting new developments and contain a large number of references. Graduate students, lecturers, researchers and professionals alike will find this book a useful resource in learning and teaching machine learning.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Pattern Recognition: 26th DAGM Symposium, LNCS, Vol. 3175

Rasmussen, C., Bülthoff, H., Giese, M., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the 26th Pattern Recognition Symposium (DAGM‘04), pages: 581, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 26th Pattern Recognition Symposium, August 2004 (proceedings)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Riemannian Geometry on Graphs and its Application to Ranking and Classification

Zhou, D.

June 2004 (talk)

Abstract
We consider the problem of transductive inference. In many real-world problems, unlabeled data is far easier to obtain than labeled data. Hence transductive inference is very significant in many practical problems. According to Vapnik's point of view, one should predict the function value only on the given points directly rather than a function defined on the whole space, the latter being a more complicated problem. Inspired by this idea, we develop discrete calculus on finite discrete spaces, and then build discrete regularization. A family of transductive algorithms is naturally derived from this regularization framework. We validate the algorithms on both synthetic and real-world data from text/web categorization to bioinformatics problems. A significant by-product of this work is a powerful way of ranking data based on examples including images, documents, proteins and many other kinds of data.

ei

PDF [BibTex]


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Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16: Proceedings of the 2003 Conference

Thrun, S., Saul, L., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS 2003), pages: 1621, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 17th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (proceedings)

Abstract
The annual Neural Information Processing (NIPS) conference is the flagship meeting on neural computation. It draws a diverse group of attendees—physicists, neuroscientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computer scientists. The presentations are interdisciplinary, with contributions in algorithms, learning theory, cognitive science, neuroscience, brain imaging, vision, speech and signal processing, reinforcement learning and control, emerging technologies, and applications. Only thirty percent of the papers submitted are accepted for presentation at NIPS, so the quality is exceptionally high. This volume contains all the papers presented at the 2003 conference.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Human Classification Behaviour Revisited by Machine Learning

Graf, A., Wichmann, F., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B.

7, pages: 134, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H., H.A. Mallot, R. Ulrich and F.A. Wichmann), 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), Febuary 2004 (poster)

Abstract
We attempt to understand visual classication in humans using both psychophysical and machine learning techniques. Frontal views of human faces were used for a gender classication task. Human subjects classied the faces and their gender judgment, reaction time (RT) and condence rating (CR) were recorded for each face. RTs are longer for incorrect answers than for correct ones, high CRs are correlated with low classication errors and RTs decrease as the CRs increase. This results suggest that patterns difcult to classify need more computation by the brain than patterns easy to classify. Hyperplane learning algorithms such as Support Vector Machines (SVM), Relevance Vector Machines (RVM), Prototype learners (Prot) and K-means learners (Kmean) were used on the same classication task using the Principal Components of the texture and oweld representation of the faces. The classication performance of the learning algorithms was estimated using the face database with the true gender of the faces as labels, and also with the gender estimated by the subjects. Kmean yield a classication performance close to humans while SVM and RVM are much better. This surprising behaviour may be due to the fact that humans are trained on real faces during their lifetime while they were here tested on articial ones, while the algorithms were trained and tested on the same set of stimuli. We then correlated the human responses to the distance of the stimuli to the separating hyperplane (SH) of the learning algorithms. On the whole stimuli far from the SH are classied more accurately, faster and with higher condence than those near to the SH if we pool data across all our subjects and stimuli. We also nd three noteworthy results. First, SVMs and RVMs can learn to classify faces using the subjects' labels but perform much better when using the true labels. Second, correlating the average response of humans (classication error, RT or CR) with the distance to the SH on a face-by-face basis using Spearman's rank correlation coefcients shows that RVMs recreate human performance most closely in every respect. Third, the mean-of-class prototype, its popularity in neuroscience notwithstanding, is the least human-like classier in all cases examined.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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m-Alternative-Forced-Choice: Improving the Efficiency of the Method of Constant Stimuli

Jäkel, F., Hill, J., Wichmann, F.

7, pages: 118, 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2004 (poster)

Abstract
We explored several ways to improve the efficiency of measuring psychometric functions without resorting to adaptive procedures. a) The number m of alternatives in an m-alternative-forced-choice (m-AFC) task improves the efficiency of the method of constant stimuli. b) When alternatives are presented simultaneously on different positions on a screen rather than sequentially time can be saved and memory load for the subject can be reduced. c) A touch-screen can further help to make the experimental procedure more intuitive. We tested these ideas in the measurement of contrast sensitivity and compared them to results obtained by sequential presentation in two-interval-forced-choice (2-IFC). Qualitatively all methods (m-AFC and 2-IFC) recovered the characterictic shape of the contrast sensitivity function in three subjects. The m-AFC paradigm only took about 60% of the time of the 2-IFC task. We tried m=2,4,8 and found 4-AFC to give the best model fits and 2-AFC to have the least bias.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Efficient Approximations for Support Vector Classifiers

Kienzle, W., Franz, M.

7, pages: 68, 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2004 (poster)

Abstract
In face detection, support vector machines (SVM) and neural networks (NN) have been shown to outperform most other classication methods. While both approaches are learning-based, there are distinct advantages and drawbacks to each method: NNs are difcult to design and train but can lead to very small and efcient classiers. In comparison, SVM model selection and training is rather straightforward, and, more importantly, guaranteed to converge to a globally optimal (in the sense of training errors) solution. Unfortunately, SVM classiers tend to have large representations which are inappropriate for time-critical image processing applications. In this work, we examine various existing and new methods for simplifying support vector decision rules. Our goal is to obtain efcient classiers (as with NNs) while keeping the numerical and statistical advantages of SVMs. For a given SVM solution, we compute a cascade of approximations with increasing complexities. Each classier is tuned so that the detection rate is near 100%. At run-time, the rst (simplest) detector is evaluated on the whole image. Then, any subsequent classier is applied only to those positions that have been classied as positive throughout all previous stages. The false positive rate at the end equals that of the last (i.e. most complex) detector. In contrast, since many image positions are discarded by lower-complexity classiers, the average computation time per patch decreases signicantly compared to the time needed for evaluating the highest-complexity classier alone.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Selective Attention to Auditory Stimuli: A Brain-Computer Interface Paradigm

Hill, N., Lal, T., Schröder, M., Hinterberger, T., Birbaumer, N., Schölkopf, B.

7, pages: 102, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H., H.A. Mallot, R. Ulrich and F.A. Wichmann), 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2004 (poster)

Abstract
During the last 20 years several paradigms for Brain Computer Interfaces have been proposed— see [1] for a recent review. They can be divided into (a) stimulus-driven paradigms, using e.g. event-related potentials or visual evoked potentials from an EEG signal, and (b) patient-driven paradigms such as those that use premotor potentials correlated with imagined action, or slow cortical potentials (e.g. [2]). Our aim is to develop a stimulus-driven paradigm that is applicable in practice to patients. Due to the unreliability of visual perception in “locked-in” patients in the later stages of disorders such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, we concentrate on the auditory modality. Speci- cally, we look for the effects, in the EEG signal, of selective attention to one of two concurrent auditory stimulus streams, exploiting the increased activation to attended stimuli that is seen under some circumstances [3]. We present the results of our preliminary experiments on normal subjects. On each of 400 trials, two repetitive stimuli (sequences of drum-beats or other pulsed stimuli) could be heard simultaneously. The two stimuli were distinguishable from one another by their acoustic properties, by their source location (one from a speaker to the left of the subject, the other from the right), and by their differing periodicities. A visual cue preceded the stimulus by 500 msec, indicating which of the two stimuli to attend to, and the subject was instructed to count the beats in the attended stimulus stream. There were up to 6 beats of each stimulus: with equal probability on each trial, all 6 were played, or the fourth was omitted, or the fth was omitted. The 40-channel EEG signals were analyzed ofine to reconstruct which of the streams was attended on each trial. A linear Support Vector Machine [4] was trained on a random subset of the data and tested on the remainder. Results are compared from two types of pre-processing of the signal: for each stimulus stream, (a) EEG signals at the stream's beat periodicity are emphasized, or (b) EEG signals following beats are contrasted with those following missing beats. Both forms of pre-processing show promising results, i.e. that selective attention to one or the other auditory stream yields signals that are classiable signicantly above chance performance. In particular, the second pre-processing was found to be robust to reduction in the number of features used for classication (cf. [5]), helping us to eliminate noise.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Texture and Haptic Cues in Slant Discrimination: Measuring the Effect of Texture Type

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Ernst, M., Wagemans, J.

7, pages: 165, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., H. A. Mallot, R. Ulrich, F. A. Wichmann), 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2004 (poster)

Abstract
In a number of models of depth cue combination the depth percept is constructed via a weighted average combination of independent depth estimations. The inuence of each cue in such average depends on the reliability of the source of information [1,5]. In particular, Ernst and Banks (2002) formulate such combination as that of the minimum variance unbiased estimator that can be constructed from the available cues. We have observed systematic differences in slant discrimination performance of human observers when different types of textures were used as cue to slant [4]. If the depth percept behaves as described above, our measurements of the slopes of the psychometric functions provide the predicted weights for the texture cue for the ranked texture types. However, the results for slant discrimination obtained when combining these texture types with object motion results are difcult to reconcile with the minimum variance unbiased estimator model [3]. This apparent failure of such model might be explained by the existence of a coupling of texture and motion, violating the assumption of independence of cues. Hillis, Ernst, Banks, and Landy (2002) [2] have shown that while for between-modality combination the human visual system has access to the single-cue information, for withinmodality combination (visual cues) the single-cue information is lost. This suggests a coupling between visual cues and independence between visual and haptic cues. Then, in the present study we combined the different texture types with haptic information in a slant discrimination task, to test whether in the between-modality condition these cues are combined as predicted by an unbiased, minimum variance estimator model. The measured weights for the cues were consistent with a combination rule sensitive to the reliability of the sources of information, but did not match the predictions of a statistically optimal combination.

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