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Institute Talks

Self-Supervised Representation Learning for Visual Behavior Analysis and Synthesis

Talk
  • 14 December 2018 • 12:00 13:00
  • Prof. Dr. Björn Ommer
  • PS Aquarium

Understanding objects and their behavior from images and videos is a difficult inverse problem. It requires learning a metric in image space that reflects object relations in real world. This metric learning problem calls for large volumes of training data. While images and videos are easily available, labels are not, thus motivating self-supervised metric and representation learning. Furthermore, I will present a widely applicable strategy based on deep reinforcement learning to improve the surrogate tasks underlying self-supervision. Thereafter, the talk will cover the learning of disentangled representations that explicitly separate different object characteristics. Our approach is based on an analysis-by-synthesis paradigm and can generate novel object instances with flexible changes to individual characteristics such as their appearance and pose. It nicely addresses diverse applications in human and animal behavior analysis, a topic we have intensive collaboration on with neuroscientists. Time permitting, I will discuss the disentangling of representations from a wider perspective including novel strategies to image stylization and new strategies for regularization of the latent space of generator networks.

Organizers: Joel Janai

Generating Faces & Heads: Texture, Shape and Beyond.

Talk
  • 17 December 2018 • 11:00 12:00
  • Stefanos Zafeiriou
  • PS Aquarium

The past few years with the advent of Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (DCNNs), as well as the availability of visual data it was shown that it is possible to produce excellent results in very challenging tasks, such as visual object recognition, detection, tracking etc. Nevertheless, in certain tasks such as fine-grain object recognition (e.g., face recognition) it is very difficult to collect the amount of data that are needed. In this talk, I will show how, using DCNNs, we can generate highly realistic faces and heads and use them for training algorithms such as face and facial expression recognition. Next, I will reverse the problem and demonstrate how by having trained a very powerful face recognition network it can be used to perform very accurate 3D shape and texture reconstruction of faces from a single image. Finally, I will demonstrate how to create very lightweight networks for representing 3D face texture and shape structure by capitalising upon intrinsic mesh convolutions.

Organizers: Dimitris Tzionas

Deep learning on 3D face reconstruction, modelling and applications

Talk
  • 19 December 2018 • 11:00 12:00
  • Yao Feng
  • PS Aquarium

In this talk, I will present my understanding on 3D face reconstruction, modelling and applications from a deep learning perspective. In the first part of my talk, I will discuss the relationship between representations (point clouds, meshes, etc) and network layers (CNN, GCN, etc) on face reconstruction task, then present my ECCV work PRN which proposed a new representation to help achieve state-of-the-art performance on face reconstruction and dense alignment tasks. I will also introduce my open source project face3d that provides examples for generating different 3D face representations. In the second part of the talk, I will talk some publications in integrating 3D techniques into deep networks, then introduce my upcoming work which implements this. In the third part, I will present how related tasks could promote each other in deep learning, including face recognition for face reconstruction task and face reconstruction for face anti-spoofing task. Finally, with such understanding of these three parts, I will present my plans on 3D face modelling and applications.

Organizers: Timo Bolkart

Mind Games

IS Colloquium
  • 21 December 2018 • 11:00 12:00
  • Peter Dayan
  • IS Lecture Hall

Much existing work in reinforcement learning involves environments that are either intentionally neutral, lacking a role for cooperation and competition, or intentionally simple, when agents need imagine nothing more than that they are playing versions of themselves. Richer game theoretic notions become important as these constraints are relaxed. For humans, this encompasses issues that concern utility, such as envy and guilt, and that concern inference, such as recursive modeling of other players, I will discuss studies treating a paradigmatic game of trust as an interactive partially-observable Markov decision process, and will illustrate the solution concepts with evidence from interactions between various groups of subjects, including those diagnosed with borderline and anti-social personality disorders.

TBA

IS Colloquium
  • 28 January 2019 • 11:15 12:15
  • Florian Marquardt

Organizers: Matthias Bauer

Learning Control for Intelligent Physical Systems

Talk
  • 13 July 2018 • 14:15 14:45
  • Dr. Sebastian Trimpe
  • MPI-IS, Stuttgart, Lecture Hall 2 D5

Modern technology allows us to collect, process, and share more data than ever before. This data revolution opens up new ways to design control and learning algorithms, which will form the algorithmic foundation for future intelligent systems that shall act autonomously in the physical world. Starting from a discussion of the special challenges when combining machine learning and control, I will present some of our recent research in this exciting area. Using the example of the Apollo robot learning to balance a stick in its hand, I will explain how intelligent agents can learn new behavior from just a few experimental trails. I will also discuss the need for theoretical guarantees in learning-based control, and how we can obtain them by combining learning and control theory.

Organizers: Katherine Kuchenbecker Ildikó Papp-Wiedmann Matthias Tröndle Claudia Daefler


  • Dr. Martin Hägele
  • MPI-IS, Stuttgart, Lecture Hall 2 D5

In 1995 Fraunhofer IPA embarked on a mission towards designing a personal robot assistant for everyday tasks. In the following years Care-O-bot developed into a long-term experiment for exploring and demonstrating new robot technologies and future product visions. The recent fourth generation of the Care-O-bot, introduced in 2014 aimed at designing an integrated system which addressed a number of innovations such as modularity, “low-cost” by making use of new manufacturing processes, and advanced human-user interaction. Some 15 systems were built and the intellectual property (IP) generated by over 20 years of research was recently licensed to a start-up. The presentation will review the path from an experimental platform for building up expertise in various robotic disciplines to recent pilot applications based on the now commercial Care-O-bot hardware.

Organizers: Katherine Kuchenbecker Ildikó Papp-Wiedmann Matthias Tröndle Claudia Daefler



  • Prof. Dr. Dawn Bonnell
  • MPI-IS, Stuttgart, Lecture Hall 2 D5

With the ubiquity of catalyzed reactions in manufacturing, the emergence of the device laden internet of things, and global challenges with respect to water and energy, it has never been more important to understand atomic interactions in the functional materials that can provide solutions in these spaces.

Organizers: Katherine Kuchenbecker Ildikó Papp-Wiedmann Matthias Tröndle Claudia Daefler


  • Prof. Dr. Thomas Ertl
  • MPI-IS, Stuttgart, Lecture Hall 2 D5

Big Data has become the general term relating to the benefits and threats which result from the huge amount of data collected in all parts of society. While data acquisition, storage and access are relevant technical aspects, the analysis of the collected data turns out to be at the core of the Big Data challenge. Automatic data mining and information retrieval techniques have made much progress but many application scenarios remain in which the human in the loop plays an essential role. Consequently, interactive visualization techniques have become a key discipline of Big Data analysis and the field is reaching out to many new application domains. This talk will give examples from current visualization research projects at the University of Stuttgart demonstrating the thematic breadth of application scenarios and the technical depth of the employed methods. We will cover advances in scientific visualization of fields and particles, visual analytics of document collections and movement patterns as well as cognitive aspects.

Organizers: Katherine Kuchenbecker Ildikó Papp-Wiedmann Matthias Tröndle Claudia Daefler


  • Carl E. Rasmussen
  • MPI IS Lecture Hall Tübingen

Gaussian Processes are a principled, practical, probabilistic approach to learning in flexible non-parametric models and have found numerous applications in regression, classification, unsupervised learning and reinforcement learning. Inference, learning and prediction can be done exactly on small data sets with Gaussian likelihood. In more realistic application with large scale data and more complicated likelihoods approximations are necessary. The variational framework for approximate inference in Gaussian processes has emerged recently as a highly effective and practical tool. I will review and demonstrate the capabilities of this framework applied to non-linear state space models.

Organizers: Philipp Hennig


  • Weiqiang Chen Ph.D.
  • Stuttgart

Taking advantages of state-of-art micro/nanotechnologies, fascinating functional biomaterials and integrated biosystems, we can address numerous important problems in fundamental biology as well as clinical applications in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Organizers: Peer Fischer


  • Robin Thandiackal
  • 2P4, Stuttgart MPI IS

Exciting talk on modeling anguilliform swimming, robotic testing.

Organizers: Steve Heim Alexander Sproewitz


  • Zeynep Akata
  • S2.014

Clearly explaining a rationale for a classification decision to an end-user can be as important as the decision itself. Existing approaches for deep visual recognition are generally opaque and do not output any justification text; contemporary vision-language models can describe image content but fail to take into account class-discriminative image aspects which justify visual predictions. In this talk, I will present my past and current work on Zero-Shot Learning, Vision and Language for Generative Modeling and Explainable Artificial Intelligence in that (1) how we can generalize the image classification models to the cases when no visual training data is available, (2) how to generate images and image features using detailed visual descriptions, and (3) how our models focus on discriminating properties of the visible object, jointly predict a class label,explain why the predicted label is appropriate for the image whereas another label is not.

Organizers: Andreas Geiger


Structure-Aware Shape Synthesis

Talk
  • 03 July 2018 • 11:00 12:00
  • Elena Balashova (Sizikova)
  • Aquarium N3

Complex shapes can can be summarized using a coarsely defined structure which is consistent and robust across variety of observations. However, existing synthesis techniques do not consider structural decomposition during synthesis, causing generation of implausible or structurally unrealistic shapes. We explore how structure-aware reasoning can benefit existing generative techniques for complex 2D and 3D shapes. We evaluate our methodology on a 3D dataset of chairs and a 2D dataset of typefaces.

Organizers: Sergi Pujades