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2003


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Kernel Methods and Their Applications to Signal Processing

Bousquet, O., Perez-Cruz, F.

In Proceedings. (ICASSP ‘03), Special Session on Kernel Methods, pages: 860 , ICASSP, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently introduced in Machine Learning, the notion of kernels has drawn a lot of interest as it allows to obtain non-linear algorithms from linear ones in a simple and elegant manner. This, in conjunction with the introduction of new linear classification methods such as the Support Vector Machines has produced significant progress. The successes of such algorithms is now spreading as they are applied to more and more domains. Many Signal Processing problems, by their non-linear and high-dimensional nature may benefit from such techniques. We give an overview of kernel methods and their recent applications.

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PDF PostScript [BibTex]

2003


PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Predictive control with Gaussian process models

Kocijan, J., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE., Likar, B.

In Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon 2003: Computer as a Tool, pages: 352-356, (Editors: Zajc, B. and M. Tkal), Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon: Computer as a Tool, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper describes model-based predictive control based on Gaussian processes.Gaussian process models provide a probabilistic non-parametric modelling approach for black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems. It offers more insight in variance of obtained model response, as well as fewer parameters to determine than other models. The Gaussian processes can highlight areas of the input space where prediction quality is poor, due to the lack of data or its complexity, by indicating the higher variance around the predicted mean. This property is used in predictive control, where optimisation of control signal takes the variance information into account. The predictive control principle is demonstrated on a simulated example of nonlinear system.

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PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Distance-based classification with Lipschitz functions

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O.

In Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, pages: 314-328, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. and M.K. Warmuth), Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to develop a framework for large margin classification in metric spaces. We want to find a generalization of linear decision functions for metric spaces and define a corresponding notion of margin such that the decision function separates the training points with a large margin. It will turn out that using Lipschitz functions as decision functions, the inverse of the Lipschitz constant can be interpreted as the size of a margin. In order to construct a clean mathematical setup we isometrically embed the given metric space into a Banach space and the space of Lipschitz functions into its dual space. Our approach leads to a general large margin algorithm for classification in metric spaces. To analyze this algorithm, we first prove a representer theorem. It states that there exists a solution which can be expressed as linear combination of distances to sets of training points. Then we analyze the Rademacher complexity of some Lipschitz function classes. The generality of the Lipschitz approach can be seen from the fact that several well-known algorithms are special cases of the Lipschitz algorithm, among them the support vector machine, the linear programming machine, and the 1-nearest neighbor classifier.

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PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]