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2016


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MuProp: Unbiased Backpropagation for Stochastic Neural Networks

Gu, S., Levine, S., Sutskever, I., Mnih, A.

4th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), May 2016 (conference)

ei

Arxiv [BibTex]

2016


Arxiv [BibTex]


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An Improved Cognitive Brain-Computer Interface for Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Hohmann, M. R., Fomina, T., Jayaram, V., Förster, C., Just, J., M., S., Schölkopf, B., Schöls, L., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

Proceedings of the Sixth International BCI Meeting, pages: 44, (Editors: Müller-Putz, G. R. and Huggins, J. E. and Steyrl, D.), BCI, May 2016 (conference)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Movement Primitives with Multiple Phase Parameters

Ewerton, M., Maeda, G., Neumann, G., Kisner, V., Kollegger, G., Wiemeyer, J., Peters, J.

IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 201-206, IEEE, May 2016 (conference)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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TerseSVM : A Scalable Approach for Learning Compact Models in Large-scale Classification

Babbar, R., Muandet, K., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the 2016 SIAM International Conference on Data Mining (SDM), pages: 234-242, (Editors: Sanjay Chawla Venkatasubramanian and Wagner Meira), May 2016 (conference)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


A Lightweight Robotic Arm with Pneumatic Muscles for Robot Learning
A Lightweight Robotic Arm with Pneumatic Muscles for Robot Learning

Büchler, D., Ott, H., Peters, J.

Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 4086-4092, IEEE, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2016 (conference)

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ICRA16final DOI Project Page [BibTex]

ICRA16final DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Probabilistic Approximate Least-Squares
Probabilistic Approximate Least-Squares

Bartels, S., Hennig, P.

Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 51, pages: 676-684, JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings, (Editors: Gretton, A. and Robert, C. C. ), May 2016 (conference)

Abstract
Least-squares and kernel-ridge / Gaussian process regression are among the foundational algorithms of statistics and machine learning. Famously, the worst-case cost of exact nonparametric regression grows cubically with the data-set size; but a growing number of approximations have been developed that estimate good solutions at lower cost. These algorithms typically return point estimators, without measures of uncertainty. Leveraging recent results casting elementary linear algebra operations as probabilistic inference, we propose a new approximate method for nonparametric least-squares that affords a probabilistic uncertainty estimate over the error between the approximate and exact least-squares solution (this is not the same as the posterior variance of the associated Gaussian process regressor). This allows estimating the error of the least-squares solution on a subset of the data relative to the full-data solution. The uncertainty can be used to control the computational effort invested in the approximation. Our algorithm has linear cost in the data-set size, and a simple formal form, so that it can be implemented with a few lines of code in programming languages with linear algebra functionality.

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link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Learning soft task priorities for control of redundant robots

Modugno, V., Neumann, G., Rueckert, E., Oriolo, G., Peters, J., Ivaldi, S.

IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 221-226, IEEE, May 2016 (conference)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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On the Reliability of Information and Trustworthiness of Web Sources in Wikipedia

Tabibian, B., Farajtabar, M., Valera, I., Song, L., Schölkopf, B., Gomez Rodriguez, M.

Wikipedia workshop at the 10th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM), May 2016 (conference)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Peer Grading in a Course on Algorithms and Data Structures: Machine Learning Algorithms do not Improve over Simple Baselines
Peer Grading in a Course on Algorithms and Data Structures: Machine Learning Algorithms do not Improve over Simple Baselines

Sajjadi, M. S. M., Alamgir, M., von Luxburg, U.

Proceedings of the 3rd ACM conference on Learning @ Scale, pages: 369-378, (Editors: Haywood, J. and Aleven, V. and Kay, J. and Roll, I.), ACM, L@S, April 2016, (An earlier version of this paper had been presented at the ICML 2015 workshop for Machine Learning for Education.) (conference)

ei

Arxiv Peer-Grading dataset request [BibTex]

Arxiv Peer-Grading dataset request [BibTex]


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Fabular: Regression Formulas As Probabilistic Programming

Borgström, J., Gordon, A. D., Ouyang, L., Russo, C., Ścibior, A., Szymczak, M.

Proceedings of the 43rd Annual ACM SIGPLAN-SIGACT Symposium on Principles of Programming Languages (POPL), pages: 271-283, POPL ’16, ACM, January 2016 (conference)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Modeling Variability of Musculoskeletal Systems with Heteroscedastic Gaussian Processes
Modeling Variability of Musculoskeletal Systems with Heteroscedastic Gaussian Processes

Büchler, D., Calandra, R., Peters, J.

Workshop on Neurorobotics, Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2016 (conference)

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NIPS16Neurorobotics [BibTex]

NIPS16Neurorobotics [BibTex]


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Causal and statistical learning

Schölkopf, B., Janzing, D., Lopez-Paz, D.

Oberwolfach Reports, 13(3):1896-1899, (Editors: A. Christmann and K. Jetter and S. Smale and D.-X. Zhou), 2016 (conference)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Convex Model of Momentum Dynamics for Multi-Contact Motion Generation

Ponton, B., Herzog, A., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In 2016 IEEE-RAS 16th International Conference on Humanoid Robots Humanoids, pages: 842-849, IEEE, Cancun, Mexico, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Linear models for control and motion generation of humanoid robots have received significant attention in the past years, not only due to their well known theoretical guarantees, but also because of practical computational advantages. However, to tackle more challenging tasks and scenarios such as locomotion on uneven terrain, a more expressive model is required. In this paper, we are interested in contact interaction-centered motion optimization based on the momentum dynamics model. This model is non-linear and non-convex; however, we find a relaxation of the problem that allows us to formulate it as a single convex quadratically-constrained quadratic program (QCQP) that can be very efficiently optimized and is useful for multi-contact planning. This convex model is then coupled to the optimization of end-effector contact locations using a mixed integer program, which can also be efficiently solved. This becomes relevant e.g. to recover from external pushes, where a predefined stepping plan is likely to fail and an online adaptation of the contact location is needed. The performance of our algorithm is demonstrated in several multi-contact scenarios for a humanoid robot.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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On the Effects of Measurement Uncertainty in Optimal Control of Contact Interactions

Ponton, B., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In The 12th International Workshop on the Algorithmic Foundations of Robotics WAFR, Berkeley, USA, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Stochastic Optimal Control (SOC) typically considers noise only in the process model, i.e. unknown disturbances. However, in many robotic applications involving interaction with the environment, such as locomotion and manipulation, uncertainty also comes from lack of precise knowledge of the world, which is not an actual disturbance. We analyze the effects of also considering noise in the measurement model, by devel- oping a SOC algorithm based on risk-sensitive control, that includes the dynamics of an observer in such a way that the control law explicitly de- pends on the current measurement uncertainty. In simulation results on a simple 2D manipulator, we have observed that measurement uncertainty leads to low impedance behaviors, a result in contrast with the effects of process noise that creates stiff behaviors. This suggests that taking into account measurement uncertainty could be a potentially very interesting way to approach problems involving uncertain contact interactions.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Inertial Sensor-Based Humanoid Joint State Estimation

Rotella, N., Mason, S., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In 2016 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 1825-1831, IEEE, Stockholm, Sweden, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This work presents methods for the determination of a humanoid robot's joint velocities and accelerations directly from link-mounted Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) each containing a three-axis gyroscope and a three-axis accelerometer. No information about the global pose of the floating base or its links is required and precise knowledge of the link IMU poses is not necessary due to presented calibration routines. Additionally, a filter is introduced to fuse gyroscope angular velocities with joint position measurements and compensate the computed joint velocities for time-varying gyroscope biases. The resulting joint velocities are subject to less noise and delay than filtered velocities computed from numerical differentiation of joint potentiometer signals, leading to superior performance in joint feedback control as demonstrated in experiments performed on a SARCOS hydraulic humanoid.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Stepping Stabilization Using a Combination of DCM Tracking and Step Adjustment

Khadiv, M., Kleff, S., Herzog, A., Moosavian, S. A. A., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In 2016 4th International Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ICROM), pages: 130-135, IEEE, Teheran, Iran, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, a method for stabilizing biped robots stepping by a combination of Divergent Component of Motion (DCM) tracking and step adjustment is proposed. In this method, the DCM trajectory is generated, consistent with the predefined footprints. Furthermore, a swing foot trajectory modification strategy is proposed to adapt the landing point, using DCM measurement. In order to apply the generated trajectories to the full robot, a Hierarchical Inverse Dynamics (HID) is employed. The HID enables us to use different combinations of the DCM tracking and step adjustment for stabilizing different biped robots. Simulation experiments on two scenarios for two different simulated robots, one with active ankles and the other with passive ankles, are carried out. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for robots with both active and passive ankles.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Structured contact force optimization for kino-dynamic motion generation

Herzog, A., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In 2016 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pages: 2703-2710, IEEE, Daejeon, South Korea, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Optimal control approaches in combination with trajectory optimization have recently proven to be a promising control strategy for legged robots. Computationally efficient and robust algorithms were derived using simplified models of the contact interaction between robot and environment such as the linear inverted pendulum model (LIPM). However, as humanoid robots enter more complex environments, less restrictive models become increasingly important. As we leave the regime of linear models, we need to build dedicated solvers that can compute interaction forces together with consistent kinematic plans for the whole-body. In this paper, we address the problem of planning robot motion and interaction forces for legged robots given predefined contact surfaces. The motion generation process is decomposed into two alternating parts computing force and motion plans in coherence. We focus on the properties of the momentum computation leading to sparse optimal control formulations to be exploited by a dedicated solver. In our experiments, we demonstrate that our motion generation algorithm computes consistent contact forces and joint trajectories for our humanoid robot. We also demonstrate the favorable time complexity due to our formulation and composition of the momentum equations.

am mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Balancing and Walking Using Full Dynamics LQR Control With Contact Constraints

Mason, S., Rotella, N., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In 2016 IEEE-RAS 16th International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids), pages: 63-68, IEEE, Cancun, Mexico, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Torque control algorithms which consider robot dynamics and contact constraints are important for creating dynamic behaviors for humanoids. As computational power increases, algorithms tend to also increase in complexity. However, it is not clear how much complexity is really required to create controllers which exhibit good performance. In this paper, we study the capabilities of a simple approach based on contact consistent LQR controllers designed around key poses to control various tasks on a humanoid robot. We present extensive experimental results on a hydraulic, torque controlled humanoid performing balancing and stepping tasks. This feedback control approach captures the necessary synergies between the DoFs of the robot to guarantee good control performance. We show that for the considered tasks, it is only necessary to re-linearize the dynamics of the robot at different contact configurations and that increasing the number of LQR controllers along desired trajectories does not improve performance. Our result suggest that very simple controllers can yield good performance competitive with current state of the art, but more complex, optimization-based whole-body controllers. A video of the experiments can be found at https://youtu.be/5T08CNKV1hw.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Step Timing Adjustement: a Step toward Generating Robust Gaits

Khadiv, M., Herzog, A., Moosavian, S. A. A., Righetti, L.

In 2016 IEEE-RAS 16th International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids), pages: 35-42, IEEE, Cancun, Mexico, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Step adjustment for humanoid robots has been shown to improve robustness in gaits. However, step duration adaptation is often neglected in control strategies. In this paper, we propose an approach that combines both step location and timing adjustment for generating robust gaits. In this approach, step location and step timing are decided, based on feedback from the current state of the robot. The proposed approach is comprised of two stages. In the first stage, the nominal step location and step duration for the next step or a previewed number of steps are specified. In this stage which is done at the start of each step, the main goal is to specify the best step length and step duration for a desired walking speed. The second stage deals with finding the best landing point and landing time of the swing foot at each control cycle. In this stage, stability of the gaits is preserved by specifying a desired offset between the swing foot landing point and the Divergent Component of Motion (DCM) at the end of current step. After specifying the landing point of the swing foot at a desired time, the swing foot trajectory is regenerated at each control cycle to realize desired landing properties. Simulation on different scenarios shows the robustness of the generated gaits from our proposed approach compared to the case where no timing adjustment is employed.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2003


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On the Complexity of Learning the Kernel Matrix

Bousquet, O., Herrmann, D.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 399-406, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate data based procedures for selecting the kernel when learning with Support Vector Machines. We provide generalization error bounds by estimating the Rademacher complexities of the corresponding function classes. In particular we obtain a complexity bound for function classes induced by kernels with given eigenvectors, i.e., we allow to vary the spectrum and keep the eigenvectors fix. This bound is only a logarithmic factor bigger than the complexity of the function class induced by a single kernel. However, optimizing the margin over such classes leads to overfitting. We thus propose a suitable way of constraining the class. We use an efficient algorithm to solve the resulting optimization problem, present preliminary experimental results, and compare them to an alignment-based approach.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2003


PDF Web [BibTex]


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Cluster Kernels for Semi-Supervised Learning

Chapelle, O., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 585-592, (Editors: S Becker and S Thrun and K Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 16th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a framework to incorporate unlabeled data in kernel classifier, based on the idea that two points in the same cluster are more likely to have the same label. This is achieved by modifying the eigenspectrum of the kernel matrix. Experimental results assess the validity of this approach.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Mismatch String Kernels for SVM Protein Classification

Leslie, C., Eskin, E., Weston, J., Noble, W.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1417-1424, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We introduce a class of string kernels, called mismatch kernels, for use with support vector machines (SVMs) in a discriminative approach to the protein classification problem. These kernels measure sequence similarity based on shared occurrences of k-length subsequences, counted with up to m mismatches, and do not rely on any generative model for the positive training sequences. We compute the kernels efficiently using a mismatch tree data structure and report experiments on a benchmark SCOP dataset, where we show that the mismatch kernel used with an SVM classifier performs as well as the Fisher kernel, the most successful method for remote homology detection, while achieving considerable computational savings.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Dependency Estimation

Weston, J., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Vapnik, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 873-880, (Editors: S Becker and S Thrun and K Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 16th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Linear Combinations of Optic Flow Vectors for Estimating Self-Motion: a Real-World Test of a Neural Model

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1319-1326, (Editors: Becker, S., S. Thrun and K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an estimator consisting of a linear combination of optic flow vectors that incorporates prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and self-motion statistics of the sensor. The estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Clustering with the Fisher score

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 729-736, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently the Fisher score (or the Fisher kernel) is increasingly used as a feature extractor for classification problems. The Fisher score is a vector of parameter derivatives of loglikelihood of a probabilistic model. This paper gives a theoretical analysis about how class information is preserved in the space of the Fisher score, which turns out that the Fisher score consists of a few important dimensions with class information and many nuisance dimensions. When we perform clustering with the Fisher score, K-Means type methods are obviously inappropriate because they make use of all dimensions. So we will develop a novel but simple clustering algorithm specialized for the Fisher score, which can exploit important dimensions. This algorithm is successfully tested in experiments with artificial data and real data (amino acid sequences).

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Marginalized Kernels between Labeled Graphs

Kashima, H., Tsuda, K., Inokuchi, A.

In 20th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 321-328, (Editors: Faucett, T. and N. Mishra), 20th International Conference on Machine Learning, August 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Sparse Gaussian Processes: inference, subspace identification and model selection

Csato, L., Opper, M.

In Proceedings, pages: 1-6, (Editors: Van der Hof, , Wahlberg), The Netherlands, 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identifiaction, August 2003, electronical version; Index ThA02-2 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Gaussian Process (GP) inference is a probabilistic kernel method where the GP is treated as a latent function. The inference is carried out using the Bayesian online learning and its extension to the more general iterative approach which we call TAP/EP learning. Sparsity is introduced in this context to make the TAP/EP method applicable to large datasets. We address the prohibitive scaling of the number of parameters by defining a subset of the training data that is used as the support the GP, thus the number of required parameters is independent of the training set, similar to the case of ``Support--‘‘ or ``Relevance--Vectors‘‘. An advantage of the full probabilistic treatment is that allows the computation of the marginal data likelihood or evidence, leading to hyper-parameter estimation within the GP inference. An EM algorithm to choose the hyper-parameters is proposed. The TAP/EP learning is the E-step and the M-step then updates the hyper-parameters. Due to the sparse E-step the resulting algorithm does not involve manipulation of large matrices. The presented algorithm is applicable to a wide variety of likelihood functions. We present results of applying the algorithm on classification and nonstandard regression problems for artificial and real datasets.

ei

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]


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Adaptive, Cautious, Predictive control with Gaussian Process Priors

Murray-Smith, R., Sbarbaro, D., Rasmussen, CE., Girard, A.

In Proceedings of the 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identification, pages: 1195-1200, (Editors: Van den Hof, P., B. Wahlberg and S. Weiland), Proceedings of the 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identification, August 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Nonparametric Gaussian Process models, a Bayesian statistics approach, are used to implement a nonlinear adaptive control law. Predictions, including propagation of the state uncertainty are made over a k-step horizon. The expected value of a quadratic cost function is minimised, over this prediction horizon, without ignoring the variance of the model predictions. The general method and its main features are illustrated on a simulation example.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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On the Representation, Learning and Transfer of Spatio-Temporal Movement Characteristics

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Mezger, J., Giese, MA.

In Humanoids Proceedings, pages: 0-0, Humanoids Proceedings, July 2003, electronical version (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we present a learning-based approach for the modelling of complex movement sequences. Based on the method of Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models (STMMS. We derive a hierarchical algorithm that, in a first step, identifies automatically movement elements in movement sequences based on a coarse spatio-temporal description, and in a second step models these movement primitives by approximation through linear combinations of learned example movement trajectories. We describe the different steps of the algorithm and show how it can be applied for modelling and synthesis of complex sequences of human movements that contain movement elements with variable style. The proposed method is demonstrated on different applications of movement representation relevant for imitation learning of movement styles in humanoid robotics.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A case based comparison of identification with neural network and Gaussian process models.

Kocijan, J., Banko, B., Likar, B., Girard, A., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Control Systems and Signal Processing ICONS 2003, 1, pages: 137-142, (Editors: Ruano, E.A.), Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Control Systems and Signal Processing ICONS, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper an alternative approach to black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems is compared with the more established approach of using artificial neural networks. The Gaussian process prior approach is a representative of non-parametric modelling approaches. It was compared on a pH process modelling case study. The purpose of modelling was to use the model for control design. The comparison revealed that even though Gaussian process models can be effectively used for modelling dynamic systems caution has to be axercised when signals are selected.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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On-Line One-Class Support Vector Machines. An Application to Signal Segmentation

Gretton, A., Desobry, ..

In IEEE ICASSP Vol. 2, pages: 709-712, IEEE ICASSP, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we describe an efficient algorithm to sequentially update a density support estimate obtained using one-class support vector machines. The solution provided is an exact solution, which proves to be far more computationally attractive than a batch approach. This deterministic technique is applied to the problem of audio signal segmentation, with simulations demonstrating the computational performance gain on toy data sets, and the accuracy of the segmentation on audio signals.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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The Kernel Mutual Information

Gretton, A., Herbrich, R., Smola, A.

In IEEE ICASSP Vol. 4, pages: 880-883, IEEE ICASSP, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We introduce a new contrast function, the kernel mutual information (KMI), to measure the degree of independence of continuous random variables. This contrast function provides an approximate upper bound on the mutual information, as measured near independence, and is based on a kernel density estimate of the mutual information between a discretised approximation of the continuous random variables. We show that Bach and Jordan‘s kernel generalised variance (KGV) is also an upper bound on the same kernel density estimate, but is looser. Finally, we suggest that the addition of a regularising term in the KGV causes it to approach the KMI, which motivates the introduction of this regularisation.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models for Representation of complex movements for Imitation Learning

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Franz, MO., Giese, M.

In 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, (2):453-458, (Editors: Nunes, U., A. de Almeida, A. Bejczy, K. Kosuge and J.A.T. Machado), 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, January 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Feature Selection for Support Vector Machines by Means of Genetic Algorithms

Fröhlich, H., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, pages: 142-148, 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Propagation of Uncertainty in Bayesian Kernel Models - Application to Multiple-Step Ahead Forecasting

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Girard, A., Larsen, J., Rasmussen, CE.

In IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2, pages: 701-704, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The object of Bayesian modelling is the predictive distribution, which in a forecasting scenario enables improved estimates of forecasted values and their uncertainties. In this paper we focus on reliably estimating the predictive mean and variance of forecasted values using Bayesian kernel based models such as the Gaussian Process and the Relevance Vector Machine. We derive novel analytic expressions for the predictive mean and variance for Gaussian kernel shapes under the assumption of a Gaussian input distribution in the static case, and of a recursive Gaussian predictive density in iterative forecasting. The capability of the method is demonstrated for forecasting of time-series and compared to approximate methods.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Clustering of Images using their Joint Segmentation

Seldin, Y., Starik, S., Werman, M.

In The 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV 2003), pages: 1-24, 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV), 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Methods and Their Applications to Signal Processing

Bousquet, O., Perez-Cruz, F.

In Proceedings. (ICASSP ‘03), Special Session on Kernel Methods, pages: 860 , ICASSP, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently introduced in Machine Learning, the notion of kernels has drawn a lot of interest as it allows to obtain non-linear algorithms from linear ones in a simple and elegant manner. This, in conjunction with the introduction of new linear classification methods such as the Support Vector Machines has produced significant progress. The successes of such algorithms is now spreading as they are applied to more and more domains. Many Signal Processing problems, by their non-linear and high-dimensional nature may benefit from such techniques. We give an overview of kernel methods and their recent applications.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Predictive control with Gaussian process models

Kocijan, J., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE., Likar, B.

In Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon 2003: Computer as a Tool, pages: 352-356, (Editors: Zajc, B. and M. Tkal), Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon: Computer as a Tool, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper describes model-based predictive control based on Gaussian processes.Gaussian process models provide a probabilistic non-parametric modelling approach for black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems. It offers more insight in variance of obtained model response, as well as fewer parameters to determine than other models. The Gaussian processes can highlight areas of the input space where prediction quality is poor, due to the lack of data or its complexity, by indicating the higher variance around the predicted mean. This property is used in predictive control, where optimisation of control signal takes the variance information into account. The predictive control principle is demonstrated on a simulated example of nonlinear system.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Distance-based classification with Lipschitz functions

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O.

In Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, pages: 314-328, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. and M.K. Warmuth), Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to develop a framework for large margin classification in metric spaces. We want to find a generalization of linear decision functions for metric spaces and define a corresponding notion of margin such that the decision function separates the training points with a large margin. It will turn out that using Lipschitz functions as decision functions, the inverse of the Lipschitz constant can be interpreted as the size of a margin. In order to construct a clean mathematical setup we isometrically embed the given metric space into a Banach space and the space of Lipschitz functions into its dual space. Our approach leads to a general large margin algorithm for classification in metric spaces. To analyze this algorithm, we first prove a representer theorem. It states that there exists a solution which can be expressed as linear combination of distances to sets of training points. Then we analyze the Rademacher complexity of some Lipschitz function classes. The generality of the Lipschitz approach can be seen from the fact that several well-known algorithms are special cases of the Lipschitz algorithm, among them the support vector machine, the linear programming machine, and the 1-nearest neighbor classifier.

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PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Evolution of Fault-tolerant Self-replicating Structures

Righetti, L., Shokur, S., Capcarre, M.

In Advances in Artificial Life, pages: 278-288, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Designed and evolved self-replicating structures in cellular automata have been extensively studied in the past as models of Artificial Life. However, CAs, unlike their biological counterpart, are very brittle: any faulty cell usually leads to the complete destruction of any emerging structures, let alone self-replicating structures. A way to design fault-tolerant structures based on error-correcting-code has been presented recently [1], but it required a cumbersome work to be put into practice. In this paper, we get back to the original inspiration for these works, nature, and propose a way to evolve self-replicating structures, faults here being only an idiosyncracy of the environment.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]