Header logo is


2005


no image
Splines with non positive kernels

Canu, S., Ong, CS., Mary, X.

In 5th International ISAAC Congress, pages: 1-10, (Editors: Begehr, H. G.W., F. Nicolosi), World Scientific, Singapore, 5th International ISAAC Congress, July 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Non parametric regressions methods can be presented in two main clusters. The one of smoothing splines methods requiring positive kernels and the other one known as Nonparametric Kernel Regression allowing the use of non positive kernels such as the Epanechnikov kernel. We propose a generalization of the smoothing spline method to include kernels which are still symmetric but not positive semi definite (they are called indefinite). The general relationship between smoothing spline, Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces and positive kernels no longer exists with indefinite kernel. Instead they are associated with functional spaces called Reproducing Kernel Krein Spaces (RKKS) embedded with an indefinite inner product and thus not directly associated with a norm. Smothing splines in RKKS have many of the interesting properties of splines in RKHS, such as orthogon ality, projection, representer theorem and generalization bounds. We show that smoothing splines can be defined in RKKS as the regularized solution of the interpolation problem. Since no norm is available in a RKKS, Tikhonov regularization cannot be defined. Instead, we proposed to use iterative methods of conjugate gradient type with early stopping as regularization mechanism. Several iterative algorithms were collected which can be used to solve the optimization problems associated with learning in indefinite spaces. Some preliminary experiments with indefinite kernels for spline smoothing are reported revealing the computational efficiency of the approach.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2005


PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Kernel Methods for Implicit Surface Modeling

Schölkopf, B., Giesen, J., Spalinger, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 17, pages: 1193-1200, (Editors: LK Saul and Y Weiss and L Bottou), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 18th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), July 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe methods for computing an implicit model of a hypersurface that is given only by a finite sampling. The methods work by mapping the sample points into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space and then determining regions in terms of hyperplanes.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Comparative evaluation of Independent Components Analysis algorithms for isolating target-relevant information in brain-signal classification

Hill, N., Schröder, M., Lal, T., Schölkopf, B.

Brain-Computer Interface Technology, 3, pages: 95, June 2005 (poster)

ei

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Machine-Learning Approaches to BCI in Tübingen

Bensch, M., Bogdan, M., Hill, N., Lal, T., Rosenstiel, W., Schölkopf, B., Schröder, M.

Brain-Computer Interface Technology, June 2005, Talk given by NJH. (talk)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Generalized Nonnegative Matrix Approximations using Bregman Divergences

Sra, S., Dhillon, I.

Univ. of Texas at Austin, June 2005 (techreport)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Learning Motor Primitives with Reinforcement Learning

Peters, J., Schaal, S.

ROBOTICS Workshop on Modular Foundations for Control and Perception, June 2005 (talk)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Image Reconstruction by Linear Programming

Tsuda, K., Rätsch, G.

IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 14(6):737-744, June 2005 (article)

Abstract
One way of image denoising is to project a noisy image to the subspace of admissible images derived, for instance, by PCA. However, a major drawback of this method is that all pixels are updated by the projection, even when only a few pixels are corrupted by noise or occlusion. We propose a new method to identify the noisy pixels by l1-norm penalization and to update the identified pixels only. The identification and updating of noisy pixels are formulated as one linear program which can be efficiently solved. In particular, one can apply the upsilon trick to directly specify the fraction of pixels to be reconstructed. Moreover, we extend the linear program to be able to exploit prior knowledge that occlusions often appear in contiguous blocks (e.g., sunglasses on faces). The basic idea is to penalize boundary points and interior points of the occluded area differently. We are also able to show the upsilon property for this extended LP leading to a method which is easy to use. Experimental results demonstrate the power of our approach.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
RASE: recognition of alternatively spliced exons in C.elegans

Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Schölkopf, B.

Bioinformatics, 21(Suppl. 1):i369-i377, June 2005 (article)

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Matrix Exponentiated Gradient Updates for On-line Learning and Bregman Projection

Tsuda, K., Rätsch, G., Warmuth, M.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 6, pages: 995-1018, June 2005 (article)

Abstract
We address the problem of learning a symmetric positive definite matrix. The central issue is to design parameter updates that preserve positive definiteness. Our updates are motivated with the von Neumann divergence. Rather than treating the most general case, we focus on two key applications that exemplify our methods: on-line learning with a simple square loss, and finding a symmetric positive definite matrix subject to linear constraints. The updates generalize the exponentiated gradient (EG) update and AdaBoost, respectively: the parameter is now a symmetric positive definite matrix of trace one instead of a probability vector (which in this context is a diagonal positive definite matrix with trace one). The generalized updates use matrix logarithms and exponentials to preserve positive definiteness. Most importantly, we show how the derivation and the analyses of the original EG update and AdaBoost generalize to the non-diagonal case. We apply the resulting matrix exponentiated gradient (MEG) update and DefiniteBoost to the problem of learning a kernel matrix from distance measurements.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Measuring Statistical Dependence with Hilbert-Schmidt Norms

Gretton, A., Bousquet, O., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

(140), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, June 2005 (techreport)

Abstract
We propose an independence criterion based on the eigenspectrum of covariance operators in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHSs), consisting of an empirical estimate of the Hilbert-Schmidt norm of the cross-covariance operator (we term this a Hilbert-Schmidt Independence Criterion, or HSIC). This approach has several advantages, compared with previous kernel-based independence criteria. First, the empirical estimate is simpler than any other kernel dependence test, and requires no user-defined regularisation. Second, there is a clearly defined population quantity which the empirical estimate approaches in the large sample limit, with exponential convergence guaranteed between the two: this ensures that independence tests based on HSIC do not suffer from slow learning rates. Finally, we show in the context of independent component analysis (ICA) that the performance of HSIC is competitive with that of previously published kernel-based criteria, and of other recently published ICA methods.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Protein function prediction via graph kernels

Borgwardt, KM., Ong, CS., Schönauer, S., Vishwanathan, ., Smola, AJ., Kriegel, H-P.

Bioinformatics, 21(Suppl. 1: ISMB 2005 Proceedings):i47-i56, June 2005 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Computational approaches to protein function prediction infer protein function by finding proteins with similar sequence, structure, surface clefts, chemical properties, amino acid motifs, interaction partners or phylogenetic profiles. We present a new approach that combines sequential, structural and chemical information into one graph model of proteins. We predict functional class membership of enzymes and non-enzymes using graph kernels and support vector machine classification on these protein graphs. Results: Our graph model, derivable from protein sequence and structure only, is competitive with vector models that require additional protein information, such as the size of surface pockets. If we include this extra information into our graph model, our classifier yields significantly higher accuracy levels than the vector models. Hyperkernels allow us to select and to optimally combine the most relevant node attributes in our protein graphs. We have laid the foundation for a protein function prediction system that integrates protein information from various sources efficiently and effectively.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Combining Local and Global Image Features for Object Class Recognition

Lisin, DA., Mattar, MA., Blaschko, MB., Benfield, MC., Learned-Miller, EG.

In CVPR, pages: 47-47, CVPR, June 2005 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Consistency of Kernel Canonical Correlation Analysis

Fukumizu, K., Bach, F., Gretton, A.

(942), Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 4-6-7 Minami-azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8569 Japan, June 2005 (techreport)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


Thumb xl cvpr2005
Fields of Experts: A framework for learning image priors

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2, pages: 860-867, June 2005 (inproceedings)

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Discriminative Methods for Label Sequence Learning

Altun, Y.

Brown University, Providence, RI, USA, May 2005 (phdthesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Texture and haptic cues in slant discrimination: Reliability-based cue weighting without statistically optimal cue combination

Rosas, P., Wagemans, J., Ernst, M., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 22(5):801-809, May 2005 (article)

Abstract
A number of models of depth cue combination suggest that the final depth percept results from a weighted average of independent depth estimates based on the different cues available. The weight of each cue in such an average is thought to depend on the reliability of each cue. In principle, such a depth estimation could be statistically optimal in the sense of producing the minimum variance unbiased estimator that can be constructed from the available information. Here we test such models using visual and haptic depth information. Different texture types produce differences in slant discrimination performance, providing a means for testing a reliability-sensitive cue combination model using texture as one of the cues to slant. Our results show that the weights for the cues were generally sensitive to their reliability, but fell short of statistically optimal combination—we find reliability-based re-weighting, but not statistically optimal cue combination.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Efficient Adaptive Sampling of the Psychometric Function by Maximizing Information Gain

Tanner, TG.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls University Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, May 2005 (diplomathesis)

Abstract
A common task in psychophysics is to measure the psychometric function. A psychometric function can be described by its shape and four parameters: offset or threshold, slope or width, false alarm rate or chance level and miss or lapse rate. Depending on the parameters of interest some points on the psychometric function may be more informative than others. Adaptive methods attempt to place trials on the most informative points based on the data collected in previous trials. A new Bayesian adaptive psychometric method placing trials by minimising the expected entropy of the posterior probabilty dis- tribution over a set of possible stimuli is introduced. The method is more flexible, faster and at least as efficient as the established method (Kontsevich and Tyler, 1999). Comparably accurate (2dB) threshold and slope estimates can be obtained after about 30 and 500 trials, respectively. By using a dynamic termination criterion the efficiency can be further improved. The method can be applied to all experimental designs including yes/no designs and allows acquisition of any set of free parameters. By weighting the importance of parameters one can include nuisance parameters and adjust the relative expected errors. Use of nuisance parameters may lead to more accurate estimates than assuming a guessed fixed value. Block designs are supported and do not harm the performance if a sufficient number of trials are performed. The method was evaluated by computer simulations in which the role of parametric assumptions, its robustness, the quality of different point estimates, the effect of dynamic termination criteria and many other settings were investigated.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Support Vector Classification of Images with Local Features

Blaschko, MB.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, May 2005 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Motor Skill Learning for Humanoid Robots

Peters, J.

First Conference Undergraduate Computer Sciences and Informations Sciences (CS/IS), May 2005 (talk)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Bayesian inference for psychometric functions

Kuss, M., Jäkel, F., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 5(5):478-492, May 2005 (article)

Abstract
In psychophysical studies, the psychometric function is used to model the relation between physical stimulus intensity and the observer’s ability to detect or discriminate between stimuli of different intensities. In this study, we propose the use of Bayesian inference to extract the information contained in experimental data to estimate the parameters of psychometric functions. Because Bayesian inference cannot be performed analytically, we describe how a Markov chain Monte Carlo method can be used to generate samples from the posterior distribution over parameters. These samples are used to estimate Bayesian confidence intervals and other characteristics of the posterior distribution. In addition, we discuss the parameterization of psychometric functions and the role of prior distributions in the analysis. The proposed approach is exemplified using artificially generated data and in a case study for real experimental data. Furthermore, we compare our approach with traditional methods based on maximum likelihood parameter estimation combined with bootstrap techniques for confidence interval estimation and find the Bayesian approach to be superior.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Classification of natural scenes using global image statistics

Drewes, J., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

47, pages: 88, 47. Tagung Experimentell Arbeitender Psychologen, April 2005 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
To apply score function difference based ICA algorithms to high-dimensional data

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Proceedings of the 13th European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks (ESANN 2005), pages: 291-297, 13th European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks (ESANN), April 2005 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
A gene expression map of Arabidopsis thaliana development

Schmid, M., Davison, T., Henz, S., Pape, U., Demar, M., Vingron, M., Schölkopf, B., Weigel, D., Lohmann, J.

Nature Genetics, 37(5):501-506, April 2005 (article)

Abstract
Regulatory regions of plant genes tend to be more compact than those of animal genes, but the complement of transcription factors encoded in plant genomes is as large or larger than that found in those of animals. Plants therefore provide an opportunity to study how transcriptional programs control multicellular development. We analyzed global gene expression during development of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana in samples covering many stages, from embryogenesis to senescence, and diverse organs. Here, we provide a first analysis of this data set, which is part of the AtGenExpress expression atlas. We observed that the expression levels of transcription factor genes and signal transduction components are similar to those of metabolic genes. Examining the expression patterns of large gene families, we found that they are often more similar than would be expected by chance, indicating that many gene families have been co-opted for specific developmental processes.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Joint Regularization

Borgwardt, KM., Guttman, O., Vishwanathan, SVN., Smola, AJ.

In pages: 455-460, (Editors: Verleysen, M.), d-side, Evere, Belgium, 13th European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks (ESANN), April 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a principled method to combine kernels under joint regularization constraints. Central to our method is an extension of the representer theorem for handling multiple joint regularization constraints. Experimental evidence shows the feasibility of our approach.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Modeling Induced Master Motion in Force-Reflecting Teleoperation

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Niemeyer, G.

In Proc. IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 348-353, Barcelona, Spain, April 2005, Oral presentation given by Kuchenbecker (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Morphological characterization of molecular complexes present in the synaptic cleft

Lucic, V., Yang, T., Schweikert, G., Förster, F., Baumeister, W.

Structure, 13(3):423-434, March 2005 (article)

Abstract
We obtained tomograms of isolated mammalian excitatory synapses by cryo-electron tomography. This method allows the investigation of biological material in the frozen-hydrated state, without staining, and can therefore provide reliable structural information at the molecular level. We developed an automated procedure for the segmentation of molecular complexes present in the synaptic cleft based on thresholding and connectivity, and calculated several morphological characteristics of these complexes. Extensive lateral connections along the synaptic cleft are shown to form a highly connected structure with a complex topology. Our results are essentially parameter-free, i.e., they do not depend on the choice of certain parameter values (such as threshold). In addition, the results are not sensitive to noise; the same conclusions can be drawn from the analysis of both nondenoised and denoised tomograms.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
EEG Source Localization for Brain-Computer-Interfaces

Grosse-Wentrup, M.

In 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, pages: 128-131, IEEE, 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, March 2005 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Experimentally optimal v in support vector regression for different noise models and parameter settings

Chalimourda, A., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

Neural Networks, 18(2):205-205, March 2005 (article)

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Adhesive microstructure and method of forming same

Fearing, R. S., Sitti, M.

March 2005, US Patent 6,872,439 (misc)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Event-Based Haptics and Acceleration Matching: Portraying and Assessing the Realism of Contact

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Fiene, J. P., Niemeyer, G.

In Proc. IEEE World Haptics Conference, pages: 381-387, Pisa, Italy, March 2005, Oral presentation given by Kuchenbecker (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Event-Based Haptic Feedback

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Fiene, J. P., Niemeyer, G.

Hands-on demonstration at IEEE World Haptics Conference, Pisa, Italy, March 2005 (misc)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Classification of Natural Scenes using Global Image Statistics

Drewes, J., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

8, pages: 88, 8th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2005 (poster)

Abstract
The algorithmic classification of complex, natural scenes is generally considered a difficult task due to the large amount of information conveyed by natural images. Work by Simon Thorpe and colleagues showed that humans are capable of detecting animals within novel natural scenes with remarkable speed and accuracy. This suggests that the relevant information for classification can be extracted at comparatively limited computational cost. One hypothesis is that global image statistics such as the amplitude spectrum could underly fast image classification (Johnson & Olshausen, Journal of Vision, 2003; Torralba & Oliva, Network: Comput. Neural Syst., 2003). We used linear discriminant analysis to classify a set of 11.000 images into animal and nonanimal images. After applying a DFT to the image, we put the Fourier spectrum of each image into 48 bins (8 orientations with 6 frequency bands). Using all of these bins, classification performance on the Fourier spectrum reached 70%. In an iterative procedure, we then removed the bins whose absence caused the smallest damage to the classification performance (one bin per iteration). Notably, performance stayed at about 70% until less then 6 bins were left. A detailed analysis of the classification weights showed that a comparatively high level of performance (67%) could also be obtained when only 2 bins were used, namely the vertical orientations at the highest spatial frequency band. When using only a single frequency band (8 bins) we found that 67% classification performance could be reached when only the high spatial frequency information was used, which decreased steadily at lower spatial frequencies, reaching a minimum (50%) for the low spatial frequency information. Similar results were obtained when all bins were used on spatially pre-filtered images. Our results show that in the absence of sophisticated machine learning techniques, animal detection in natural scenes is limited to rather modest levels of performance, far below those of human observers. If limiting oneself to global image statistics such as the DFT then mostly information at the highest spatial frequencies is useful for the task. This is analogous to the results obtained with human observers on filtered images (Kirchner et al, VSS 2004).

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Efficient Adaptive Sampling of the Psychometric Function by Maximizing Information Gain

Tanner, T., Hill, N., Rasmussen, C., Wichmann, F.

8, pages: 109, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., H. A. Mallot, R. Ulrich and F. A. Wichmann), 8th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2005 (poster)

Abstract
A psychometric function can be described by its shape and four parameters: position or threshold, slope or width, false alarm rate or chance level, and miss or lapse rate. Depending on the parameters of interest some points on the psychometric function may be more informative than others. Adaptive methods attempt to place trials on the most informative points based on the data collected in previous trials. We introduce a new adaptive bayesian psychometric method which collects data for any set of parameters with high efficency. It places trials by minimizing the expected entropy [1] of the posterior pdf over a set of possible stimuli. In contrast to most other adaptive methods it is neither limited to threshold measurement nor to forced-choice designs. Nuisance parameters can be included in the estimation and lead to less biased estimates. The method supports block designs which do not harm the performance when a sufficient number of trials are performed. Block designs are useful for control of response bias and short term performance shifts such as adaptation. We present the results of evaluations of the method by computer simulations and experiments with human observers. In the simulations we investigated the role of parametric assumptions, the quality of different point estimates, the effect of dynamic termination criteria and many other settings. [1] Kontsevich, L.L. and Tyler, C.W. (1999): Bayesian adaptive estimation of psychometric slope and threshold. Vis. Res. 39 (16), 2729-2737.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Automatic Classification of Plankton from Digital Images

Sieracki, M., Riseman, E., Balch, W., Benfield, M., Hanson, A., Pilskaln, C., Schultz, H., Sieracki, C., Utgoff, P., Blaschko, M., Holness, G., Mattar, M., Lisin, D., Tupper, B.

ASLO Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 1, pages: 1, February 2005 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Efficient Pattern Selection for Support Vector Classifiers and its CRM Application

Shin, H.

Biologische Kybernetik, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, February 2005 (phdthesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Bayesian Inference for Psychometric Functions

Kuss, M., Jäkel, F., Wichmann, F.

8, pages: 106, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., H. A. Mallot, R. Ulrich and F. A. Wichmann), 8th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2005 (poster)

Abstract
In psychophysical studies of perception the psychometric function is used to model the relation between the physical stimulus intensity and the observer's ability to detect or discriminate between stimuli of different intensities. We propose the use of Bayesian inference to extract the information contained in experimental data to learn about the parameters of psychometric functions. Since Bayesian inference cannot be performed analytically we use a Markov chain Monte Carlo method to generate samples from the posterior distribution over parameters. These samples can be used to estimate Bayesian confidence intervals and other characteristics of the posterior distribution. We compare our approach with traditional methods based on maximum-likelihood parameter estimation combined with parametric bootstrap techniques for confidence interval estimation. Experiments indicate that Bayesian inference methods are superior to bootstrap-based methods and are thus the method of choice for estimating the psychometric function and its confidence-intervals.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Active Learning for Parzen Window Classifier

Chapelle, O.

In AISTATS 2005, pages: 49-56, (Editors: Cowell, R. , Z. Ghahramani), Tenth International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AI & Statistics), January 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The problem of active learning is approached in this paper by minimizing directly an estimate of the expected test error. The main difficulty in this ``optimal'' strategy is that output probabilities need to be estimated accurately. We suggest here different methods for estimating those efficiently. In this context, the Parzen window classifier is considered because it is both simple and probabilistic. The analysis of experimental results highlights that regularization is a key ingredient for this strategy.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Semi-Supervised Classification by Low Density Separation

Chapelle, O., Zien, A.

In AISTATS 2005, pages: 57-64, (Editors: Cowell, R. , Z. Ghahramani), Tenth International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AI & Statistics), January 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We believe that the cluster assumption is key to successful semi-supervised learning. Based on this, we propose three semi-supervised algorithms: 1. deriving graph-based distances that emphazise low density regions between clusters, followed by training a standard SVM; 2. optimizing the Transductive SVM objective function, which places the decision boundary in low density regions, by gradient descent; 3. combining the first two to make maximum use of the cluster assumption. We compare with state of the art algorithms and demonstrate superior accuracy for the latter two methods.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Automatic In Situ Identification of Plankton

Blaschko, MB., Holness, G., Mattar, MA., Lisin, D., Utgoff, PE., Hanson, AR., Schultz, H., Riseman, EM., Sieracki, ME., Balch, WM., Tupper, B.

In WACV, pages: 79 , WACV, January 2005 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Kernel Constrained Covariance for Dependence Measurement

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Bousquet, O., Herbrich, R., Belitski, A., Augath, M., Murayama, Y., Pauls, J., Schölkopf, B., Logothetis, N.

In Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, pages: 112-119, (Editors: R Cowell, R and Z Ghahramani), AISTATS, January 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We discuss reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS)-based measures of statistical dependence, with emphasis on constrained covariance (COCO), a novel criterion to test dependence of random variables. We show that COCO is a test for independence if and only if the associated RKHSs are universal. That said, no independence test exists that can distinguish dependent and independent random variables in all circumstances. Dependent random variables can result in a COCO which is arbitrarily close to zero when the source densities are highly non-smooth. All current kernel-based independence tests share this behaviour. We demonstrate exponential convergence between the population and empirical COCO. Finally, we use COCO as a measure of joint neural activity between voxels in MRI recordings of the macaque monkey, and compare the results to the mutual information and the correlation. We also show the effect of removing breathing artefacts from the MRI recording.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Hilbertian Metrics and Positive Definite Kernels on Probability Measures

Hein, M., Bousquet, O.

In AISTATS 2005, pages: 136-143, (Editors: Cowell, R. , Z. Ghahramani), Tenth International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AI & Statistics), January 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate the problem of defining Hilbertian metrics resp. positive definite kernels on probability measures, continuing previous work. This type of kernels has shown very good results in text classification and has a wide range of possible applications. In this paper we extend the two-parameter family of Hilbertian metrics of Topsoe such that it now includes all commonly used Hilbertian metrics on probability measures. This allows us to do model selection among these metrics in an elegant and unified way. Second we investigate further our approach to incorporate similarity information of the probability space into the kernel. The analysis provides a better understanding of these kernels and gives in some cases a more efficient way to compute them. Finally we compare all proposed kernels in two text and two image classification problems.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Kernel Constrained Covariance for Dependence Measurement

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Bousquet, O., Herbrich, R., Belitski, A., Augath, M., Murayama, Y., Schölkopf, B., Logothetis, N.

AISTATS, January 2005 (talk)

Abstract
We discuss reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS)-based measures of statistical dependence, with emphasis on constrained covariance (COCO), a novel criterion to test dependence of random variables. We show that COCO is a test for independence if and only if the associated RKHSs are universal. That said, no independence test exists that can distinguish dependent and independent random variables in all circumstances. Dependent random variables can result in a COCO which is arbitrarily close to zero when the source densities are highly non-smooth. All current kernel-based independence tests share this behaviour. We demonstrate exponential convergence between the population and empirical COCO. Finally, we use COCO as a measure of joint neural activity between voxels in MRI recordings of the macaque monkey, and compare the results to the mutual information and the correlation. We also show the effect of removing breathing artefacts from the MRI recording.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


no image
Composite adaptive control with locally weighted statistical learning

Nakanishi, J., Farrell, J. A., Schaal, S.

Neural Networks, 18(1):71-90, January 2005, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper introduces a provably stable learning adaptive control framework with statistical learning. The proposed algorithm employs nonlinear function approximation with automatic growth of the learning network according to the nonlinearities and the working domain of the control system. The unknown function in the dynamical system is approximated by piecewise linear models using a nonparametric regression technique. Local models are allocated as necessary and their parameters are optimized on-line. Inspired by composite adaptive control methods, the proposed learning adaptive control algorithm uses both the tracking error and the estimation error to update the parameters. We first discuss statistical learning of nonlinear functions, and motivate our choice of the locally weighted learning framework. Second, we begin with a class of first order SISO systems for theoretical development of our learning adaptive control framework, and present a stability proof including a parameter projection method that is needed to avoid potential singularities during adaptation. Then, we generalize our adaptive controller to higher order SISO systems, and discuss further extension to MIMO problems. Finally, we evaluate our theoretical control framework in numerical simulations to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed learning adaptive controller for rapid convergence and high accuracy of control.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Semi-supervised protein classification using cluster kernels

Weston, J., Leslie, C., Ie, E., Zhou, D., Elisseeff, A., Noble, W.

Bioinformatics, 21(15):3241-3247, 2005 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Kernels: Regularization and Optimization

Ong, CS.

Biologische Kybernetik, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, 2005 (phdthesis)

ei

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]


no image
Invariance of Neighborhood Relation under Input Space to Feature Space Mapping

Shin, H., Cho, S.

Pattern Recognition Letters, 26(6):707-718, 2005 (article)

Abstract
If the training pattern set is large, it takes a large memory and a long time to train support vector machine (SVM). Recently, we proposed neighborhood property based pattern selection algorithm (NPPS) which selects only the patterns that are likely to be near the decision boundary ahead of SVM training [Proc. of the 7th Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (PAKDD), Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence (LNAI 2637), Seoul, Korea, pp. 376–387]. NPPS tries to identify those patterns that are likely to become support vectors in feature space. Preliminary reports show its effectiveness: SVM training time was reduced by two orders of magnitude with almost no loss in accuracy for various datasets. It has to be noted, however, that decision boundary of SVM and support vectors are all defined in feature space while NPPS described above operates in input space. If neighborhood relation in input space is not preserved in feature space, NPPS may not always be effective. In this paper, we sh ow that the neighborhood relation is invariant under input to feature space mapping. The result assures that the patterns selected by NPPS in input space are likely to be located near decision boundary in feature space.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


no image
Intrinsic Dimensionality Estimation of Submanifolds in Euclidean space

Hein, M., Audibert, Y.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 289 , (Editors: De Raedt, L. , S. Wrobel), ICML Bonn, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a new method to estimate the intrinsic dimensionality of a submanifold M in Euclidean space from random samples. The method is based on the convergence rates of a certain U-statistic on the manifold. We solve at least partially the question of the choice of the scale of the data. Moreover the proposed method is easy to implement, can handle large data sets and performs very well even for small sample sizes. We compare the proposed method to two standard estimators on several artificial as well as real data sets.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Large Scale Genomic Sequence SVM Classifiers

Sonnenburg, S., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 849-856, (Editors: L De Raedt and S Wrobel), ACM, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In genomic sequence analysis tasks like splice site recognition or promoter identification, large amounts of training sequences are available, and indeed needed to achieve sufficiently high classification performances. In this work we study two recently proposed and successfully used kernels, namely the Spectrum kernel and the Weighted Degree kernel (WD). In particular, we suggest several extensions using Suffix Trees and modi cations of an SMO-like SVM training algorithm in order to accelerate the training of the SVMs and their evaluation on test sequences. Our simulations show that for the spectrum kernel and WD kernel, large scale SVM training can be accelerated by factors of 20 and 4 times, respectively, while using much less memory (e.g. no kernel caching). The evaluation on new sequences is often several thousand times faster using the new techniques (depending on the number of Support Vectors). Our method allows us to train on sets as large as one million sequences.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]