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Magnetic vortex core reversal by rotating magnetic fields generated on micrometer length scales

Curcic, M., Stoll, H., Weigand, M., Sackmann, V., Jüllig, P., Kammerer, M., Noske, M., Sproll, M., Van Waeyenberge, B., Vansteenkiste, A., Woltersdorf, G., Tyliszczak, T., Schütz, G.

{Physica Status Solidi B}, 248(10):2317-2322, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Operational Space Control of Constrained and Underactuated Systems

Mistry, M., Righetti, L.

In Proceedings of Robotics: Science and Systems, Los Angeles, CA, USA, June 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The operational space formulation (Khatib, 1987), applied to rigid-body manipulators, describes how to decouple task-space and null-space dynamics, and write control equations that correspond only to forces at the end-effector or, alternatively, only to motion within the null-space. We would like to apply this useful theory to modern humanoids and other legged systems, for manipulation or similar tasks, however these systems present additional challenges due to their underactuated floating bases and contact states that can dynamically change. In recent work, Sentis et al. derived controllers for such systems by implementing a task Jacobian projected into a space consistent with the supporting constraints and underactuation (the so called "support consistent reduced Jacobian"). Here, we take a new approach to derive operational space controllers for constrained underactuated systems, by first considering the operational space dynamics within "projected inverse-dynamics" (Aghili, 2005), and subsequently resolving underactuation through the addition of dynamically consistent control torques. Doing so results in a simplified control solution compared with previous results, and importantly yields several new insights into the underlying problem of operational space control in constrained environments: 1) Underactuated systems, such as humanoid robots, cannot in general completely decouple task and null-space dynamics. However, 2) there may exist an infinite number of control solutions to realize desired task-space dynamics, and 3) these solutions involve the addition of dynamically consistent null-space motion or constraint forces (or combinations of both). In light of these findings, we present several possible control solutions, with varying optimization criteria, and highlight some of their practical consequences.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Under-actuated tank-like climbing robot with various transitioning capabilities

Seo, T., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2011 IEEE International Conference on, pages: 777-782, 2011 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enhancing adhesion of biologically inspired polymer microfibers with a viscous oil coating

Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

The Journal of Adhesion, 87(6):547-557, Taylor & Francis Group, 2011 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Rotating magnetic micro-robots for versatile non-contact fluidic manipulation of micro-objects

Diller, E., Ye, Z., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 1291-1296, 2011 (inproceedings)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Formation of two amorphous phases in the Ni60Nb18Y22 alloy after high pressure torsion

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Goll, D., Baretzky, B., Bakai, A. S., Dobatkin, S. V.

{Kovove Materialy-Metallic Materials}, 49(1):17-22, 2011 (article)

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Structure and properties of nanograined Fe-C alloys after severe plastic deformation

Straumal, B. B., Dobatkin, S. V., Rodin, A. O., Protasova, S. G., Mazilkin, A. A., Goll, D., Baretzky, B.

{Advanced Engineering Materials}, 13(6):463-469, 2011 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Increased flux pinning in YBa2Cu3O7-δthin-film devices through embedding of Au nano crystals

Katzer, C., Schmidt, M., Michalowski, P., Kuhwald, D., Schmidl, F., Grosse, V., Treiber, S., Stahl, C., Albrecht, J., Hübner, U., Undisz, A., Rettenmayr, M., Schütz, G., Seidel, P.

{Europhysics Letters}, 95(6), 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Signal transfer in a chain of stray-field coupled ferromagnetic squares

Vogel, A., Martens, M., Weigand, M., Meier, G.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 99, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Transmission electron microscopy investigation of boundaries between amorphous "grains" in Ni50Nb20Y30 alloy

Mazilkin, A. A., Abrosimova, G. E., Protasova, S. G., Straumal, B. B., Schütz, G., Dobatkin, S. V., Bakai, A. S.

In 46, pages: 4336-4342, Mie, Japan, 2011 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Electron theory of magnetoelectric effects in metallic ferromagnetic nanostructures

Subkow, S., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 84, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic antivortex-core reversal by rotating magnetic fields

Kamionka, T., Martens, M., Chou, K., Drews, A., Tyliszczak, T., Stoll, H., Van Waeyenberge, B., Meier, G.

{Physical Review B}, 83, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic properties of exchange-spring composite films

Kronmüller, H., Goll, D.

{Physica Status Solidi B}, 248(10):2361-2367, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Wetting transition of grain boundaries in the Sn-rich part of the Sn-Bi phase diagram

Yeh, C.-H., Chang, L.-S., Straumal, B. B.

{Journal of Materials Science}, 46(5):1557-1562, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Online movement adaptation based on previous sensor experiences

Pastor, P., Righetti, L., Kalakrishnan, M., Schaal, S.

In 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 365-371, IEEE, San Francisco, USA, sep 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Personal robots can only become widespread if they are capable of safely operating among humans. In uncertain and highly dynamic environments such as human households, robots need to be able to instantly adapt their behavior to unforseen events. In this paper, we propose a general framework to achieve very contact-reactive motions for robotic grasping and manipulation. Associating stereotypical movements to particular tasks enables our system to use previous sensor experiences as a predictive model for subsequent task executions. We use dynamical systems, named Dynamic Movement Primitives (DMPs), to learn goal-directed behaviors from demonstration. We exploit their dynamic properties by coupling them with the measured and predicted sensor traces. This feedback loop allows for online adaptation of the movement plan. Our system can create a rich set of possible motions that account for external perturbations and perception uncertainty to generate truly robust behaviors. As an example, we present an application to grasping with the WAM robot arm.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Learning to grasp under uncertainty

Stulp, F., Theodorou, E., Buchli, J., Schaal, S.

In Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2011 IEEE International Conference on, Shanghai, China, May 9-13, 2011, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present an approach that enables robots to learn motion primitives that are robust towards state estimation uncertainties. During reaching and preshaping, the robot learns to use fine manipulation strategies to maneuver the object into a pose at which closing the hand to perform the grasp is more likely to succeed. In contrast, common assumptions in grasp planning and motion planning for reaching are that these tasks can be performed independently, and that the robot has perfect knowledge of the pose of the objects in the environment. We implement our approach using Dynamic Movement Primitives and the probabilistic model-free reinforcement learning algorithm Policy Improvement with Path Integrals (PI2 ). The cost function that PI2 optimizes is a simple boolean that penalizes failed grasps. The key to acquiring robust motion primitives is to sample the actual pose of the object from a distribution that represents the state estimation uncertainty. During learning, the robot will thus optimize the chance of grasping an object from this distribution, rather than at one specific pose. In our empirical evaluation, we demonstrate how the motion primitives become more robust when grasping simple cylindrical objects, as well as more complex, non-convex objects. We also investigate how well the learned motion primitives generalize towards new object positions and other state estimation uncertainty distributions.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Piezoelectric polymer fiber arrays for tactile sensing applications

Sümer, B., Aksak, B., Şsahin, K., Chuengsatiansup, K., Sitti, M.

Sensor Letters, 9(2):457-463, American Scientific Publishers, 2011 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Assembly and disassembly of magnetic mobile micro-robots towards deterministic 2-D reconfigurable micro-systems

Pawashe, C., Diller, E., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2011 IEEE International Conference on, pages: 261-266, 2011 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Stochastic dynamics of bacteria propelled spherical micro-robots

Arabagi, V., Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 3937-3942, 2011 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Control methodologies for a heterogeneous group of untethered magnetic micro-robots

Floyd, S., Diller, E., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 30(13):1553-1565, SAGE Publications, 2011 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Influence of dot size and annealing on the magnetic properties of large-area L10-FePt nanopatterns

Bublat, T., Goll, D.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 110(7), 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]


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The temperature-dependent magnetization profile across an epitaxial bilayer of ferromagnetic La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 and superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-δ

Brück, S., Treiber, S., Macke, S., Audehm, P., Christiani, G., Soltan, S., Habermeier, H., Goering, E., Albrecht, J.

{New Journal of Physics}, 13(3), 2011 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Spin interactions in bcc and fcc Fe beyond the Heisenberg model

Singer, R., Dietermann, F., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review Letters}, 107, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Route to a family of robust, non-interpenetrated metal-organic frameworks with pto-like topology

Klein, N., Senkovska, I., Baburin, I. A., Grünker, R., Stoeck, U., Schlichtenmayer, M., Streppel, B., Mueller, U., Leoni, S., Hirscher, M., Kaskel, S.

{Chemistry - A European Journal}, 17(46):13007-13016, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Initial stages of growth of iron on silicon for spin injection through Schottky barrier

Dash, S. P., Carstanjen, H. D.

{Physica Status Solidi B}, 248(10):2300-2304, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Fe3O4/ZnO: A high-quality magnetic oxide-semiconductor heterostructure by reactive deposition

Paul, M., Kufer, D., Müller, A., Brück, S., Goering, E., Kamp, M., Verbeeck, J., Tian, H., Van Tendeloo, G., Ingle, N. J. C., Sing, M., Claessen, R.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 98, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Influence of texture on the ferromagnetic properties of nanograined ZnO films

Straumal, B., Mazilkin, A., Protasova, S., Myatiev, A., Straumal, P., Goering, E., Baretzky, B.

{Physica Status Solidi B}, 248(7):1581-1586, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Control of spin configuration in half-metallic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 nano-structures

Rhensius, J., Vaz, C. A. F., Bisig, A., Schweitzer, S., Heidler, J., Körner, H. S., Locatelli, A., Niño, M. A., Weigand, M., Méchin, L., Gaucher, F., Goering, E., Heyderman, L. J., Kläui, M.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 99(6), 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Comparison of various sol-gel derived metal oxide layers for inverted organic solar cells

Oh, H., Krantz, J., Litzov, I., Stubhan, T., Pinna, L., Brabec, C. J.

{Solar Energy Materials \& Solar Cells}, 95(8):2194-2199, 2011 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2006


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Conformal Multi-Instance Kernels

Blaschko, M., Hofmann, T.

In NIPS 2006 Workshop on Learning to Compare Examples, pages: 1-6, NIPS Workshop on Learning to Compare Examples, December 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In the multiple instance learning setting, each observation is a bag of feature vectors of which one or more vectors indicates membership in a class. The primary task is to identify if any vectors in the bag indicate class membership while ignoring vectors that do not. We describe here a kernel-based technique that defines a parametric family of kernels via conformal transformations and jointly learns a discriminant function over bags together with the optimal parameter settings of the kernel. Learning a conformal transformation effectively amounts to weighting regions in the feature space according to their contribution to classification accuracy; regions that are discriminative will be weighted higher than regions that are not. This allows the classifier to focus on regions contributing to classification accuracy while ignoring regions that correspond to vectors found both in positive and in negative bags. We show how parameters of this transformation can be learned for support vector machines by posing the problem as a multiple kernel learning problem. The resulting multiple instance classifier gives competitive accuracy for several multi-instance benchmark datasets from different domains.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2006


PDF Web [BibTex]


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Structure validation of the Josephin domain of ataxin-3: Conclusive evidence for an open conformation

Nicastro, G., Habeck, M., Masino, L., Svergun, DI., Pastore, A.

Journal of Biomolecular NMR, 36(4):267-277, December 2006 (article)

Abstract
The availability of new and fast tools in structure determination has led to a more than exponential growth of the number of structures solved per year. It is therefore increasingly essential to assess the accuracy of the new structures by reliable approaches able to assist validation. Here, we discuss a specific example in which the use of different complementary techniques, which include Bayesian methods and small angle scattering, resulted essential for validating the two currently available structures of the Josephin domain of ataxin-3, a protein involved in the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and responsible for neurodegenerative spinocerebellar ataxia of type 3. Taken together, our results demonstrate that only one of the two structures is compatible with the experimental information. Based on the high precision of our refined structure, we show that Josephin contains an open cleft which could be directly implicated in the interaction with polyubiquitin chains and other partners.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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A Unifying View of Wiener and Volterra Theory and Polynomial Kernel Regression

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Computation, 18(12):3097-3118, December 2006 (article)

Abstract
Volterra and Wiener series are perhaps the best understood nonlinear system representations in signal processing. Although both approaches have enjoyed a certain popularity in the past, their application has been limited to rather low-dimensional and weakly nonlinear systems due to the exponential growth of the number of terms that have to be estimated. We show that Volterra and Wiener series can be represented implicitly as elements of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space by utilizing polynomial kernels. The estimation complexity of the implicit representation is linear in the input dimensionality and independent of the degree of nonlinearity. Experiments show performance advantages in terms of convergence, interpretability, and system sizes that can be handled.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Adapting Spatial Filter Methods for Nonstationary BCIs

Tomioka, R., Hill, J., Blankertz, B., Aihara, K.

In IBIS 2006, pages: 65-70, 2006 Workshop on Information-Based Induction Sciences, November 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A major challenge in applying machine learning methods to Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) is to overcome the possible nonstationarity in the data from the datablock the method is trained on and that the method is applied to. Assuming the joint distributions of the whitened signal and the class label to be identical in two blocks, where the whitening is done in each block independently, we propose a simple adaptation formula that is applicable to a broad class of spatial filtering methods including ICA, CSP, and logistic regression classifiers. We characterize the class of linear transformations for which the above assumption holds. Experimental results on 60 BCI datasets show improved classification accuracy compared to (a) fixed spatial filter approach (no adaptation) and (b) fixed spatial pattern approach (proposed by Hill et al., 2006 [1]).

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Statistical Analysis of Slow Crack Growth Experiments

Pfingsten, T., Glien, K.

Journal of the European Ceramic Society, 26(15):3061-3065, November 2006 (article)

Abstract
A common approach for the determination of Slow Crack Growth (SCG) parameters are the static and dynamic loading method. Since materials with small Weibull module show a large variability in strength, a correct statistical analysis of the data is indispensable. In this work we propose the use of the Maximum Likelihood method and a Baysian analysis, which, in contrast to the standard procedures, take into account that failure strengths are Weibull distributed. The analysis provides estimates for the SCG parameters, the Weibull module, and the corresponding confidence intervals and overcomes the necessity of manual differentiation between inert and fatigue strength data. We compare the methods to a Least Squares approach, which can be considered the standard procedure. The results for dynamic loading data from the glass sealing of MEMS devices show that the assumptions inherent to the standard approach lead to significantly different estimates.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Mining frequent stem patterns from unaligned RNA sequences

Hamada, M., Tsuda, K., Kudo, T., Kin, T., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 22(20):2480-2487, October 2006 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: In detection of non-coding RNAs, it is often necessary to identify the secondary structure motifs from a set of putative RNA sequences. Most of the existing algorithms aim to provide the best motif or few good motifs, but biologists often need to inspect all the possible motifs thoroughly. Results: Our method RNAmine employs a graph theoretic representation of RNA sequences, and detects all the possible motifs exhaustively using a graph mining algorithm. The motif detection problem boils down to finding frequently appearing patterns in a set of directed and labeled graphs. In the tasks of common secondary structure prediction and local motif detection from long sequences, our method performed favorably both in accuracy and in efficiency with the state-of-the-art methods such as CMFinder.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Large-Scale Gene Expression Profiling Reveals Major Pathogenetic Pathways of Cartilage Degeneration in Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Fundel, K., Saas, J., Gebhard, P., Haag, J., Weiss, T., Zien, A., Obermayr, F., Zimmer, R., Bartnik, E.

Arthritis and Rheumatism, 54(11):3533-3544, October 2006 (article)

Abstract
Objective. Despite many research efforts in recent decades, the major pathogenetic mechanisms of osteo- arthritis (OA), including gene alterations occurring during OA cartilage degeneration, are poorly under- stood, and there is no disease-modifying treatment approach. The present study was therefore initiated in order to identify differentially expressed disease-related genes and potential therapeutic targets. Methods. This investigation consisted of a large gene expression profiling study performed based on 78 normal and disease samples, using a custom-made complementar y DNA array covering >4,000 genes. Results. Many differentially expressed genes were identified, including the expected up-regulation of ana- bolic and catabolic matrix genes. In particular, the down-regulation of important oxidative defense genes, i.e., the genes for superoxide dismutases 2 and 3 and glutathione peroxidase 3, was prominent. This indicates that continuous oxidative stress to the cells and the matrix is one major underlying pathogenetic mecha- nism in OA. Also, genes that are involved in the phenot ypic stabilit y of cells, a feature that is greatly reduced in OA cartilage, appeared to be suppressed. Conclusion. Our findings provide a reference data set on gene alterations in OA cartilage and, importantly, indicate major mechanisms underlying central cell bio- logic alterations that occur during the OA disease process. These results identify molecular targets that can be further investigated in the search for therapeutic interventions.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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A Linear Programming Approach for Molecular QSAR analysis

Saigo, H., Kadowaki, T., Tsuda, K.

In MLG 2006, pages: 85-96, (Editors: Gärtner, T. , G. C. Garriga, T. Meinl), International Workshop on Mining and Learning with Graphs, September 2006, Best Paper Award (inproceedings)

Abstract
Small molecules in chemistry can be represented as graphs. In a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, the central task is to find a regression function that predicts the activity of the molecule in high accuracy. Setting a QSAR as a primal target, we propose a new linear programming approach to the graph-based regression problem. Our method extends the graph classification algorithm by Kudo et al. (NIPS 2004), which is a combination of boosting and graph mining. Instead of sequential multiplicative updates, we employ the linear programming boosting (LP) for regression. The LP approach allows to include inequality constraints for the parameter vector, which turns out to be particularly useful in QSAR tasks where activity values are sometimes unavailable. Furthermore, the efficiency is improved significantly by employing multiple pricing.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Incremental Aspect Models for Mining Document Streams

Surendran, A., Sra, S.

In PKDD 2006, pages: 633-640, (Editors: Fürnkranz, J. , T. Scheffer, M. Spiliopoulou), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 10th European Conference on Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we introduce a novel approach for incrementally building aspect models, and use it to dynamically discover underlying themes from document streams. Using the new approach we present an application which we call “query-line tracking” i.e., we automatically discover and summarize different themes or stories that appear over time, and that relate to a particular query. We present evaluation on news corpora to demonstrate the strength of our method for both query-line tracking, online indexing and clustering.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Implicit Surface Modelling with a Globally Regularised Basis of Compact Support

Walder, C., Schölkopf, B., Chapelle, O.

Computer Graphics Forum, 25(3):635-644, September 2006 (article)

Abstract
We consider the problem of constructing a globally smooth analytic function that represents a surface implicitly by way of its zero set, given sample points with surface normal vectors. The contributions of the paper include a novel means of regularising multi-scale compactly supported basis functions that leads to the desirable interpolation properties previously only associated with fully supported bases. We also provide a regularisation framework for simpler and more direct treatment of surface normals, along with a corresponding generalisation of the representer theorem lying at the core of kernel-based machine learning methods. We demonstrate the techniques on 3D problems of up to 14 million data points, as well as 4D time series data and four-dimensional interpolation between three-dimensional shapes.

ei

PDF GZIP DOI [BibTex]


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PALMA: Perfect Alignments using Large Margin Algorithms

Rätsch, G., Hepp, B., Schulze, U., Ong, C.

In GCB 2006, pages: 104-113, (Editors: Huson, D. , O. Kohlbacher, A. Lupas, K. Nieselt, A. Zell), Gesellschaft für Informatik, Bonn, Germany, German Conference on Bioinformatics, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Despite many years of research on how to properly align sequences in the presence of sequencing errors, alternative splicing and micro-exons, the correct alignment of mRNA sequences to genomic DNA is still a challenging task. We present a novel approach based on large margin learning that combines kernel based splice site predictions with common sequence alignment techniques. By solving a convex optimization problem, our algorithm -- called PALMA -- tunes the parameters of the model such that the true alignment scores higher than all other alignments. In an experimental study on the alignments of mRNAs containing artificially generated micro-exons, we show that our algorithm drastically outperforms all other methods: It perfectly aligns all 4358 sequences on an hold-out set, while the best other method misaligns at least 90 of them. Moreover, our algorithm is very robust against noise in the query sequence: when deleting, inserting, or mutating up to 50% of the query sequence, it still aligns 95% of all sequences correctly, while other methods achieve less than 36% accuracy. For datasets, additional results and a stand-alone alignment tool see http://www.fml.mpg.de/raetsch/projects/palma.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Graph Based Semi-Supervised Learning with Sharper Edges

Shin, H., Hill, N., Rätsch, G.

In ECML 2006, pages: 401-412, (Editors: Fürnkranz, J. , T. Scheffer, M. Spiliopoulou), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 17th European Conference on Machine Learning (ECML), September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In many graph-based semi-supervised learning algorithms, edge weights are assumed to be fixed and determined by the data points‘ (often symmetric)relationships in input space, without considering directionality. However, relationships may be more informative in one direction (e.g. from labelled to unlabelled) than in the reverse direction, and some relationships (e.g. strong weights between oppositely labelled points) are unhelpful in either direction. Undesirable edges may reduce the amount of influence an informative point can propagate to its neighbours -- the point and its outgoing edges have been ``blunted.‘‘ We present an approach to ``sharpening‘‘ in which weights are adjusted to meet an optimization criterion wherever they are directed towards labelled points. This principle can be applied to a wide variety of algorithms. In the current paper, we present one ad hoc solution satisfying the principle, in order to show that it can improve performance on a number of publicly available benchmark data sets.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Finite-Horizon Optimal State-Feedback Control of Nonlinear Stochastic Systems Based on a Minimum Principle

Deisenroth, MP., Ohtsuka, T., Weissel, F., Brunn, D., Hanebeck, UD.

In MFI 2006, pages: 371-376, (Editors: Hanebeck, U. D.), IEEE Service Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 6th IEEE International Conference on Multisensor Fusion and Integration, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, an approach to the finite-horizon optimal state-feedback control problem of nonlinear, stochastic, discrete-time systems is presented. Starting from the dynamic programming equation, the value function will be approximated by means of Taylor series expansion up to second-order derivatives. Moreover, the problem will be reformulated, such that a minimum principle can be applied to the stochastic problem. Employing this minimum principle, the optimal control problem can be rewritten as a two-point boundary-value problem to be solved at each time step of a shrinking horizon. To avoid numerical problems, the two-point boundary-value problem will be solved by means of a continuation method. Thus, the curse of dimensionality of dynamic programming is avoided, and good candidates for the optimal state-feedback controls are obtained. The proposed approach will be evaluated by means of a scalar example system.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Uniform Convergence of Adaptive Graph-Based Regularization

Hein, M.

In COLT 2006, pages: 50-64, (Editors: Lugosi, G. , H.-U. Simon), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 19th Annual Conference on Learning Theory, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The regularization functional induced by the graph Laplacian of a random neighborhood graph based on the data is adaptive in two ways. First it adapts to an underlying manifold structure and second to the density of the data-generating probability measure. We identify in this paper the limit of the regularizer and show uniform convergence over the space of Hoelder functions. As an intermediate step we derive upper bounds on the covering numbers of Hoelder functions on compact Riemannian manifolds, which are of independent interest for the theoretical analysis of manifold-based learning methods.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Regularised CSP for Sensor Selection in BCI

Farquhar, J., Hill, N., Lal, T., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 3rd International Brain-Computer Interface Workshop and Training Course 2006, pages: 14-15, (Editors: GR Müller-Putz and C Brunner and R Leeb and R Scherer and A Schlögl and S Wriessnegger and G Pfurtscheller), Verlag der Technischen Universität Graz, Graz, Austria, 3rd International Brain-Computer Interface Workshop and Training Course, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Common Spatial Pattern (CSP) algorithm is a highly successful method for efficiently calculating spatial filters for brain signal classification. Spatial filtering can improve classification performance considerably, but demands that a large number of electrodes be mounted, which is inconvenient in day-to-day BCI usage. The CSP algorithm is also known for its tendency to overfit, i.e. to learn the noise in the training set rather than the signal. Both problems motivate an approach in which spatial filters are sparsified. We briefly sketch a reformulation of the problem which allows us to do this, using 1-norm regularisation. Focusing on the electrode selection issue, we present preliminary results on EEG data sets that suggest that effective spatial filters may be computed with as few as 10--20 electrodes, hence offering the potential to simplify the practical realisation of BCI systems significantly.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Time-Dependent Demixing of Task-Relevant EEG Signals

Hill, N., Farquhar, J., Lal, T., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 3rd International Brain-Computer Interface Workshop and Training Course 2006, pages: 20-21, (Editors: GR Müller-Putz and C Brunner and R Leeb and R Scherer and A Schlögl and S Wriessnegger and G Pfurtscheller), Verlag der Technischen Universität Graz, Graz, Austria, 3rd International Brain-Computer Interface Workshop and Training Course, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Given a spatial filtering algorithm that has allowed us to identify task-relevant EEG sources, we present a simple approach for monitoring the activity of these sources while remaining relatively robust to changes in other (task-irrelevant) brain activity. The idea is to keep spatial *patterns* fixed rather than spatial filters, when transferring from training to test sessions or from one time window to another. We show that a fixed spatial pattern (FSP) approach, using a moving-window estimate of signal covariances, can be more robust to non-stationarity than a fixed spatial filter (FSF) approach.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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A Sober Look at Clustering Stability

Ben-David, S., von Luxburg, U., Pal, D.

In COLT 2006, pages: 5-19, (Editors: Lugosi, G. , H.-U. Simon), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 19th Annual Conference on Learning Theory, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Stability is a common tool to verify the validity of sample based algorithms. In clustering it is widely used to tune the parameters of the algorithm, such as the number k of clusters. In spite of the popularity of stability in practical applications, there has been very little theoretical analysis of this notion. In this paper we provide a formal definition of stability and analyze some of its basic properties. Quite surprisingly, the conclusion of our analysis is that for large sample size, stability is fully determined by the behavior of the objective function which the clustering algorithm is aiming to minimize. If the objective function has a unique global minimizer, the algorithm is stable, otherwise it is unstable. In particular we conclude that stability is not a well-suited tool to determine the number of clusters - it is determined by the symmetries of the data which may be unrelated to clustering parameters. We prove our results for center-based clusterings and for spectral clustering, and support our conclusions by many examples in which the behavior of stability is counter-intuitive.

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PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Information Marginalization on Subgraphs

Huang, J., Zhu, T., Rereiner, R., Zhou, D., Schuurmans, D.

In ECML/PKDD 2006, pages: 199-210, (Editors: Fürnkranz, J. , T. Scheffer, M. Spiliopoulou), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 10th European Conference on Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Real-world data often involves objects that exhibit multiple relationships; for example, ‘papers’ and ‘authors’ exhibit both paper-author interactions and paper-paper citation relationships. A typical learning problem requires one to make inferences about a subclass of objects (e.g. ‘papers’), while using the remaining objects and relations to provide relevant information. We present a simple, unified mechanism for incorporating information from multiple object types and relations when learning on a targeted subset. In this scheme, all sources of relevant information are marginalized onto the target subclass via random walks. We show that marginalized random walks can be used as a general technique for combining multiple sources of information in relational data. With this approach, we formulate new algorithms for transduction and ranking in relational data, and quantify the performance of new schemes on real world data—achieving good results in many problems.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Bayesian Active Learning for Sensitivity Analysis

Pfingsten, T.

In ECML 2006, pages: 353-364, (Editors: Fürnkranz, J. , T. Scheffer, M. Spiliopoulou), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 17th European Conference on Machine Learning, September 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Designs of micro electro-mechanical devices need to be robust against fluctuations in mass production. Computer experiments with tens of parameters are used to explore the behavior of the system, and to compute sensitivity measures as expectations over the input distribution. Monte Carlo methods are a simple approach to estimate these integrals, but they are infeasible when the models are computationally expensive. Using a Gaussian processes prior, expensive simulation runs can be saved. This Bayesian quadrature allows for an active selection of inputs where the simulation promises to be most valuable, and the number of simulation runs can be reduced further. We present an active learning scheme for sensitivity analysis which is rigorously derived from the corresponding Bayesian expected loss. On three fully featured, high dimensional physical models of electro-mechanical sensors, we show that the learning rate in the active learning scheme is significantly better than for passive learning.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]