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2016


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Phase transitions and optimal algorithms in high-dimensional Gaussian mixture clustering

Lesieur, T., De Bacco, C., Banks, J., Krzakala, F., Moore, C., Zdeborová, L.

In Communication, Control, and Computing (Allerton), 2016 54th Annual Allerton Conference on, pages: 601-608, 2016 (inproceedings)

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Preprint link (url) [BibTex]

2016


Preprint link (url) [BibTex]


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Helping people make better decisions using optimal gamification

Lieder, F., Griffiths, T. L.

In Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Game elements like points and levels are a popular tool to nudge and engage students and customers. Yet, no theory can tell us which incentive structures work and how to design them. Here we connect the practice of gamification to the theory of reward shaping in reinforcement learning. We leverage this connection to develop a method for designing effective incentive structures and delineating when gamification will succeed from when it will fail. We evaluate our method in two behavioral experiments. The results of the first experiment demonstrate that incentive structures designed by our method help people make better, less short-sighted decisions and avoid the pitfalls of less principled approaches. The results of the second experiment illustrate that such incentive structures can be effectively implemented using game elements like points and badges. These results suggest that our method provides a principled way to leverage gamification to help people make better decisions.

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link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

2014


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Algorithm selection by rational metareasoning as a model of human strategy selection

Lieder, F., Plunkett, D., Hamrick, J. B., Russell, S. J., Hay, N. J., Griffiths, T. L.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 27, 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Selecting the right algorithm is an important problem in computer science, because the algorithm often has to exploit the structure of the input to be efficient. The human mind faces the same challenge. Therefore, solutions to the algorithm selection problem can inspire models of human strategy selection and vice versa. Here, we view the algorithm selection problem as a special case of metareasoning and derive a solution that outperforms existing methods in sorting algorithm selection. We apply our theory to model how people choose between cognitive strategies and test its prediction in a behavioral experiment. We find that people quickly learn to adaptively choose between cognitive strategies. People's choices in our experiment are consistent with our model but inconsistent with previous theories of human strategy selection. Rational metareasoning appears to be a promising framework for reverse-engineering how people choose among cognitive strategies and translating the results into better solutions to the algorithm selection problem.

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Project Page [BibTex]

2014


Project Page [BibTex]


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The high availability of extreme events serves resource-rational decision-making

Lieder, F., Hsu, M., Griffiths, T. L.

In Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2014 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Layers of Abstraction: (Neuro)computational models of learning local and global statistical regularities

Diaconescu, A., Lieder, F., Mathys, C., Stephan, K. E.

In 20th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, 2014 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]