Header logo is


1999


no image
Kernel principal component analysis.

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

In Advances in Kernel Methods—Support Vector Learning, pages: 327-352, (Editors: B Schölkopf and CJC Burges and AJ Smola), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

1999


[BibTex]


no image
Estimating the support of a high-dimensional distribution

Schölkopf, B., Platt, J., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

(MSR-TR-99-87), Microsoft Research, 1999 (techreport)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Generalization Bounds via Eigenvalues of the Gram matrix

Schölkopf, B., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

(99-035), NeuroCOLT, 1999 (techreport)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Sparse kernel feature analysis

Smola, A., Mangasarian, O., Schölkopf, B.

(99-04), Data Mining Institute, 1999, 24th Annual Conference of Gesellschaft f{\"u}r Klassifikation, University of Passau (techreport)

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


no image
Entropy numbers, operators and support vector kernels.

Williamson, R., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning, pages: 127-144, (Editors: B Schölkopf and CJC Burges and AJ Smola), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Smola, A.

MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (book)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Artscience Sciencart
Artscience Sciencart

Black, M. J., Levy, D., PamelaZ,

In Art and Innovation: The Xerox PARC Artist-in-Residence Program, pages: 244-300, (Editors: Harris, C.), MIT-Press, 1999 (incollection)

Abstract
One of the effects of the PARC Artist In Residence (PAIR) program has been to expose the strong connections between scientists and artists. Both do what they do because they need to do it. They are often called upon to justify their work in order to be allowed to continue to do it. They need to justify it to funders, to sponsoring institutions, corporations, the government, the public. They publish papers, teach workshops, and write grants touting the educational or health benefits of what they do. All of these things are to some extent valid, but the fact of the matter is: artists and scientists do their work because they are driven to do it. They need to explore and create.

This chapter attempts to give a flavor of one multi-way "PAIRing" between performance artist PamelaZ and two PARC researchers, Michael Black and David Levy. The three of us paired up because we found each other interesting. We chose each other. While most artists in the program are paired with a single researcher Pamela jokingly calls herself a bigamist for choosing two PAIR "husbands" with different backgrounds and interests.

There are no "rules" to the PAIR program; no one told us what to do with our time. Despite this we all had a sense that we needed to produce something tangible during Pamela's year-long residency. In fact, Pamela kept extending her residency because she did not feel as though we had actually made anything concrete. The interesting thing was that all along we were having great conversations, some of which Pamela recorded. What we did not see at the time was that it was these conversations between artists and scientists that are at the heart of the PAIR program and that these conversations were changing the way we thought about our own work and the relationships between science and art.

To give these conversations their due, and to allow the reader into our PAIR interactions, we include two of our many conversations in this chapter.

ps

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Nonparametric regression for learning nonlinear transformations

Schaal, S.

In Prerational Intelligence in Strategies, High-Level Processes and Collective Behavior, 2, pages: 595-621, (Editors: Ritter, H.;Cruse, H.;Dean, J.), Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
Information processing in animals and artificial movement systems consists of a series of transformations that map sensory signals to intermediate representations, and finally to motor commands. Given the physical and neuroanatomical differences between individuals and the need for plasticity during development, it is highly likely that such transformations are learned rather than pre-programmed by evolution. Such self-organizing processes, capable of discovering nonlinear dependencies between different groups of signals, are one essential part of prerational intelligence. While neural network algorithms seem to be the natural choice when searching for solutions for learning transformations, this paper will take a more careful look at which types of neural networks are actually suited for the requirements of an autonomous learning system. The approach that we will pursue is guided by recent developments in learning theory that have linked neural network learning to well established statistical theories. In particular, this new statistical understanding has given rise to the development of neural network systems that are directly based on statistical methods. One family of such methods stems from nonparametric regression. This paper will compare nonparametric learning with the more widely used parametric counterparts in a non technical fashion, and investigate how these two families differ in their properties and their applicabilities. We will argue that nonparametric neural networks offer a set of characteristics that make them a very promising candidate for on-line learning in autonomous system.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

1994


no image
View-based cognitive mapping and path planning

Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H.

(7), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics Tübingen, November 1994, This technical report has also been published elsewhere (techreport)

Abstract
We present a scheme for learning a cognitive map of a maze from a sequence of views and movement decisions. The scheme is based on an intermediate representation called the view graph. We show that this representation carries sufficient information to reconstruct the topological and directional structure of the maze. Moreover, we present a neural network that learns the view graph during a random exploration of the maze. We use a unsupervised competitive learning rule which translates temporal sequence (rather than similarity) of views into connectedness in the network. The network uses its knowledge of the topological and directional structure of the maze to generate expectations about which views are likely to be perceived next, improving the view recognition performance. We provide an additional mechanism which uses the map to find paths between arbitrary points of the previously explored environment. The results are compared to findings of behavioural neuroscience.

ei

[BibTex]

1994


[BibTex]

1991


no image
Ways to smarter CAD-systems

Ehrlenspiel, K., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of ICED’91Heurista, pages: 10-16, (Editors: Hubka), Edition, Schriftenreihe WDK 21. Zürich, 1991, clmc (inbook)

am

[BibTex]

1991


[BibTex]