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2012


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Methods, apparatuses, and systems for micromanipulation with adhesive fibrillar structures

Sitti, M., Mengüç, Y.

December 2012, US Patent App. 14/368,079 (misc)

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[BibTex]

2012



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Dry adhesive structures

Sitti, M., Murphy, M., Aksak, B.

December 2012, US Patent App. 13/533,386 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Virtual Human Bodies with Clothing and Hair: From Images to Animation

Guan, P.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, December 2012 (phdthesis)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Scalable graph kernels

Shervashidze, N.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, October 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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From Pixels to Layers: Joint Motion Estimation and Segmentation

Sun, D.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, July 2012 (phdthesis)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Methods of making dry adhesives

Sitti, M., Murphy, M., Aksak, B.

June 2012, US Patent 8,206,631 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning Motor Skills: From Algorithms to Robot Experiments

Kober, J.

Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, March 2012 (phdthesis)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Dry adhesives and methods for making dry adhesives

Sitti, M., Murphy, M., Aksak, B.

March 2012, US Patent App. 13/429,621 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Expectation-Maximization methods for solving (PO)MDPs and optimal control problems

Toussaint, M., Storkey, A., Harmeling, S.

In Inference and Learning in Dynamic Models, (Editors: Barber, D., Cemgil, A.T. and Chiappa, S.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, January 2012 (inbook) In press

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Inferential structure determination from NMR data

Habeck, M.

In Bayesian methods in structural bioinformatics, pages: 287-312, (Editors: Hamelryck, T., Mardia, K. V. and Ferkinghoff-Borg, J.), Springer, New York, 2012 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structure and Dynamics of Diffusion Networks

Gomez Rodriguez, M.

Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Robot Learning

Sigaud, O., Peters, J.

In Encyclopedia of the sciences of learning, (Editors: Seel, N.M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning in Robotics: A Survey

Kober, J., Peters, J.

In Reinforcement Learning, 12, pages: 579-610, (Editors: Wiering, M. and Otterlo, M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

Abstract
As most action generation problems of autonomous robots can be phrased in terms of sequential decision problems, robotics offers a tremendously important and interesting application platform for reinforcement learning. Similarly, the real-world challenges of this domain pose a major real-world check for reinforcement learning. Hence, the interplay between both disciplines can be seen as promising as the one between physics and mathematics. Nevertheless, only a fraction of the scientists working on reinforcement learning are sufficiently tied to robotics to oversee most problems encountered in this context. Thus, we will bring the most important challenges faced by robot reinforcement learning to their attention. To achieve this goal, we will attempt to survey most work that has successfully applied reinforcement learning to behavior generation for real robots. We discuss how the presented successful approaches have been made tractable despite the complexity of the domain and will study how representations or the inclusion of prior knowledge can make a significant difference. As a result, a particular focus of our chapter lies on the choice between model-based and model-free as well as between value function-based and policy search methods. As a result, we obtain a fairly complete survey of robot reinforcement learning which should allow a general reinforcement learning researcher to understand this domain.

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Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Blind Deconvolution in Scientific Imaging & Computational Photography

Hirsch, M.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Higher-Order Tensors in Diffusion MRI

Schultz, T., Fuster, A., Ghosh, A., Deriche, R., Florack, L., Lim, L.

In Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data, (Editors: Westin, C. F., Vilanova, A. and Burgeth, B.), Springer, 2012 (inbook) Accepted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Automated Tip-Based 2-D Mechanical Assembly of Micro/Nanoparticles

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

In Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms, pages: 69-108, Springer US, 2012 (incollection)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Wasserstoffspeicherkapazität poröser Materialien in Kryoadsorptionstanks

Schlichtenmayer, M.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Behandlung stark nichtkollinearer Magnetisierungsstrukturen mit der Spin-Cluster-Entwicklung

Dietermann, F.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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The principles of XMCD and its application to L-edges in transition metals

Schütz, G.

In Linear and Chiral Dichroism in the Electron Miroscope, pages: 23-42, Pan Stanford Publishing Pte.Ltd., Singapore, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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An Introduction to Random Forests for Multi-class Object Detection

Gall, J., Razavi, N., van Gool, L.

In Outdoor and Large-Scale Real-World Scene Analysis, 7474, pages: 243-263, LNCS, (Editors: Dellaert, Frank and Frahm, Jan-Michael and Pollefeys, Marc and Rosenhahn, Bodo and Leal-Taix’e, Laura), Springer, 2012 (incollection)

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code code for Hough forest publisher's site pdf Project Page [BibTex]

code code for Hough forest publisher's site pdf Project Page [BibTex]


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Home 3D body scans from noisy image and range data

Weiss, A., Hirshberg, D., Black, M. J.

In Consumer Depth Cameras for Computer Vision: Research Topics and Applications, pages: 99-118, 6, (Editors: Andrea Fossati and Juergen Gall and Helmut Grabner and Xiaofeng Ren and Kurt Konolige), Springer-Verlag, 2012 (incollection)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Spinwelleninduziertes Schalten magnetischer Vortexkerne

Kammerer, M.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Die Stabilität des stromtragenden Zustands in MgB2 Schichten mit modifizierter Mikrostruktur

Treiber, S.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hartmagnetische L10-FePt basierte gro\ssflächige Nanomuster mittels Nanoimprint-Lithografie

Bublat, T.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structural and chemical characterization on the nanoscale

Stierle, A., Carstanjen, H.-D., Hofmann, S.

In Nanoelectronics and Information Technology. Advanced Electronic Materials and Novel Devices, pages: 233-254, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Rutherford Backscattering

Carstanjen, H. D.

In Nanoelectronics and Information Technology. Advanced Electronic Materials and Novel Devices, pages: 250-252, WILEY-VCH Verlag, Weinheim, Germany, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2010


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Markerless tracking of Dynamic 3D Scans of Faces

Walder, C., Breidt, M., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B., Curio, C.

In Dynamic Faces: Insights from Experiments and Computation, pages: 255-276, (Editors: Curio, C., Bülthoff, H. H. and Giese, M. A.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2010 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

2010


Web [BibTex]


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Policy Gradient Methods

Peters, J., Bagnell, J.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, pages: 774-776, (Editors: Sammut, C. and Webb, G. I.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, December 2010 (inbook)

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PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Bayesian Inference and Experimental Design for Large Generalised Linear Models

Nickisch, H.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany, September 2010 (phdthesis)

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PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Inferring High-Dimensional Causal Relations using Free Probability Theory

Zscheischler, J.

Humboldt Universität Berlin, Germany, August 2010 (diplomathesis)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Semi-supervised Subspace Learning and Application to Human Functional Magnetic Brain Resonance Imaging Data

Shelton, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard Karls Universität, Tübingen, Germany, July 2010 (diplomathesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Quantitative Evaluation of MR-based Attenuation Correction for Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

Mantlik, F.

Biologische Kybernetik, Universität Mannheim, Germany, March 2010 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning Continuous Grasp Affordances by Sensorimotor Exploration

Detry, R., Baseski, E., Popovic, M., Touati, Y., Krüger, N., Kroemer, O., Peters, J., Piater, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 451-465, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
We develop means of learning and representing object grasp affordances probabilistically. By grasp affordance, we refer to an entity that is able to assess whether a given relative object-gripper configuration will yield a stable grasp. These affordances are represented with grasp densities, continuous probability density functions defined on the space of 3D positions and orientations. Grasp densities are registered with a visual model of the object they characterize. They are exploited by aligning them to a target object using visual pose estimation. Grasp densities are refined through experience: A robot “plays” with an object by executing grasps drawn randomly for the object’s grasp density. The robot then uses the outcomes of these grasps to build a richer density through an importance sampling mechanism. Initial grasp densities, called hypothesis densities, are bootstrapped from grasps collected using a motion capture system, or from grasps generated from the visual model of the object. Refined densities, called empirical densities, represent affordances that have been confirmed through physical experience. The applicability of our method is demonstrated by producing empirical densities for two object with a real robot and its 3-finger hand. Hypothesis densities are created from visual cues and human demonstration.

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PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Imitation and Reinforcement Learning for Motor Primitives with Perceptual Coupling

Kober, J., Mohler, B., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 209-225, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
Traditional motor primitive approaches deal largely with open-loop policies which can only deal with small perturbations. In this paper, we present a new type of motor primitive policies which serve as closed-loop policies together with an appropriate learning algorithm. Our new motor primitives are an augmented version version of the dynamical system-based motor primitives [Ijspeert et al(2002)Ijspeert, Nakanishi, and Schaal] that incorporates perceptual coupling to external variables. We show that these motor primitives can perform complex tasks such as Ball-in-a-Cup or Kendama task even with large variances in the initial conditions where a skilled human player would be challenged. We initialize the open-loop policies by imitation learning and the perceptual coupling with a handcrafted solution. We first improve the open-loop policies and subsequently the perceptual coupling using a novel reinforcement learning method which is particularly well-suited for dynamical system-based motor primitives.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots

Sigaud, O., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 1-12, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
The number of advanced robot systems has been increasing in recent years yielding a large variety of versatile designs with many degrees of freedom. These robots have the potential of being applicable in uncertain tasks outside wellstructured industrial settings. However, the complexity of both systems and tasks is often beyond the reach of classical robot programming methods. As a result, a more autonomous solution for robot task acquisition is needed where robots adaptively adjust their behaviour to the encountered situations and required tasks. Learning approaches pose one of the most appealing ways to achieve this goal. However, while learning approaches are of high importance for robotics, we cannot simply use off-the-shelf methods from the machine learning community as these usually do not scale into the domains of robotics due to excessive computational cost as well as a lack of scalability. Instead, domain appropriate approaches are needed. In this book, we focus on several core domains of robot learning. For accurate task execution, we need motor learning capabilities. For fast learning of the motor tasks, imitation learning offers the most promising approach. Self improvement requires reinforcement learning approaches that scale into the domain of complex robots. Finally, for efficient interaction of humans with robot systems, we will need a form of interaction learning. This chapter provides a general introduction to these issues and briefly presents the contributions of the subsequent chapters to the corresponding research topics.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Real-Time Local GP Model Learning

Nguyen-Tuong, D., Seeger, M., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, 264, pages: 193-207, Studies in Computational Intelligence, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
For many applications in robotics, accurate dynamics models are essential. However, in some applications, e.g., in model-based tracking control, precise dynamics models cannot be obtained analytically for sufficiently complex robot systems. In such cases, machine learning offers a promising alternative for approximating the robot dynamics using measured data. However, standard regression methods such as Gaussian process regression (GPR) suffer from high computational complexity which prevents their usage for large numbers of samples or online learning to date. In this paper, we propose an approximation to the standard GPR using local Gaussian processes models inspired by [Vijayakumar et al(2005)Vijayakumar, D’Souza, and Schaal, Snelson and Ghahramani(2007)]. Due to reduced computational cost, local Gaussian processes (LGP) can be applied for larger sample-sizes and online learning. Comparisons with other nonparametric regressions, e.g., standard GPR, support vector regression (SVR) and locally weighted proje ction regression (LWPR), show that LGP has high approximation accuracy while being sufficiently fast for real-time online learning.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Finding Gene-Gene Interactions using Support Vector Machines

Rakitsch, B.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2010 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Accurate Prediction of Protein-Coding Genes with Discriminative Learning Techniques

Schweikert, G.

Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, 2010 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]


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Machine Learning Methods for Automatic Image Colorization

Charpiat, G., Bezrukov, I., Hofmann, M., Altun, Y., Schölkopf, B.

In Computational Photography: Methods and Applications, pages: 395-418, Digital Imaging and Computer Vision, (Editors: Lukac, R.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
We aim to color greyscale images automatically, without any manual intervention. The color proposition could then be interactively corrected by user-provided color landmarks if necessary. Automatic colorization is nontrivial since there is usually no one-to-one correspondence between color and local texture. The contribution of our framework is that we deal directly with multimodality and estimate, for each pixel of the image to be colored, the probability distribution of all possible colors, instead of choosing the most probable color at the local level. We also predict the expected variation of color at each pixel, thus defining a non-uniform spatial coherency criterion. We then use graph cuts to maximize the probability of the whole colored image at the global level. We work in the L-a-b color space in order to approximate the human perception of distances between colors, and we use machine learning tools to extract as much information as possible from a dataset of colored examples. The resulting algorithm is fast, designed to be more robust to texture noise, and is above all able to deal with ambiguity, in contrary to previous approaches.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Structural and Relational Data Mining for Systems Biology Applications

Georgii, E.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany , 2010 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Population Coding in the Visual System: Statistical Methods and Theory

Macke, J.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2010 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian Methods for Neural Data Analysis

Gerwinn, S.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2010 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]