Header logo is


2019


no image
Semi-supervised learning, causality, and the conditional cluster assumption

von Kügelgen, J., Mey, A., Loog, M., Schölkopf, B.

NeurIPS 2019 Workshop “Do the right thing”: machine learning and causal inference for improved decision making, December 2019 (poster) Accepted

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

2019


link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Optimal experimental design via Bayesian optimization: active causal structure learning for Gaussian process networks

von Kügelgen, J., Rubenstein, P., Schölkopf, B., Weller, A.

NeurIPS 2019 Workshop “Do the right thing”: machine learning and causal inference for improved decision making, December 2019 (poster) Accepted

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Demo Abstract: Fast Feedback Control and Coordination with Mode Changes for Wireless Cyber-Physical Systems

(Best Demo Award)

Mager, F., Baumann, D., Jacob, R., Thiele, L., Trimpe, S., Zimmerling, M.

Proceedings of the 18th ACM/IEEE Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN), pages: 340-341, 18th ACM/IEEE Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN), April 2019 (poster)

ics

arXiv PDF DOI [BibTex]

arXiv PDF DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl lic overview
Fast and Resource-Efficient Control of Wireless Cyber-Physical Systems

Baumann, D.

KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Febuary 2019 (phdthesis)

ics

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Learning Transferable Representations

Rojas-Carulla, M.

University of Cambridge, UK, 2019 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Sample-efficient deep reinforcement learning for continuous control

Gu, S.

University of Cambridge, UK, 2019 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]


no image
Spatial Filtering based on Riemannian Manifold for Brain-Computer Interfacing

Xu, J.

Technical University of Munich, Germany, 2019 (mastersthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Perception of temporal dependencies in autoregressive motion

Meding, K., Schölkopf, B., Wichmann, F. A.

European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP), 2019 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Novel X-ray lenses for direct and coherent imaging

Sanli, U. T.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2019 (phdthesis)

mms

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Quantification of tumor heterogeneity using PET/MRI and machine learning

Katiyar, P.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2019 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Phenomenal Causality and Sensory Realism

Bruijns, S. A., Meding, K., Schölkopf, B., Wichmann, F. A.

European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP), 2019 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Actively Learning Dynamical Systems with Gaussian Processes

Buisson-Fenet, M.

Mines ParisTech, PSL Research University, 2019 (mastersthesis)

Abstract
Predicting the behavior of complex systems is of great importance in many fields such as engineering, economics or meteorology. The evolution of such systems often follows a certain structure, which can be induced, for example from the laws of physics or of market forces. Mathematically, this structure is often captured by differential equations. The internal functional dependencies, however, are usually unknown. Hence, using machine learning approaches that recreate this structure directly from data is a promising alternative to designing physics-based models. In particular, for high dimensional systems with nonlinear effects, this can be a challenging task. Learning dynamical systems is different from the classical machine learning tasks, such as image processing, and necessitates different tools. Indeed, dynamical systems can be actuated, often by applying torques or voltages. Hence, the user has a power of decision over the system, and can drive it to certain states by going through the dynamics. Actuating this system generates data, from which a machine learning model of the dynamics can be trained. However, gathering informative data that is representative of the whole state space remains a challenging task. The question of active learning then becomes important: which control inputs should be chosen by the user so that the data generated during an experiment is informative, and enables efficient training of the dynamics model? In this context, Gaussian processes can be a useful framework for approximating system dynamics. Indeed, they perform well on small and medium sized data sets, as opposed to most other machine learning frameworks. This is particularly important considering data is often costly to generate and process, most of all when producing it involves actuating a complex physical system. Gaussian processes also yield a notion of uncertainty, which indicates how sure the model is about its predictions. In this work, we investigate in a principled way how to actively learn dynamical systems, by selecting control inputs that generate informative data. We model the system dynamics by a Gaussian process, and use information-theoretic criteria to identify control trajectories that maximize the information gain. Thus, the input space can be explored efficiently, leading to a data-efficient training of the model. We propose several methods, investigate their theoretical properties and compare them extensively in a numerical benchmark. The final method proves to be efficient at generating informative data. Thus, it yields the lowest prediction error with the same amount of samples on most benchmark systems. We propose several variants of this method, allowing the user to trade off computations with prediction accuracy, and show it is versatile enough to take additional objectives into account.

ics

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2012


Thumb xl pengthesisteaser
Virtual Human Bodies with Clothing and Hair: From Images to Animation

Guan, P.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, December 2012 (phdthesis)

ps

pdf [BibTex]

2012


pdf [BibTex]


no image
Scalable graph kernels

Shervashidze, N.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, October 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


Thumb xl deqingthesisteaser
From Pixels to Layers: Joint Motion Estimation and Segmentation

Sun, D.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, July 2012 (phdthesis)

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Blind Retrospective Motion Correction of MR Images

Loktyushin, A., Nickisch, H., Pohmann, R., Schölkopf, B.

20th Annual Scientific Meeting ISMRM, May 2012 (poster)

Abstract
Patient motion in the scanner is one of the most challenging problems in MRI. We propose a new retrospective motion correction method for which no tracking devices or specialized sequences are required. We seek the motion parameters such that the image gradients in the spatial domain become sparse. We then use these parameters to invert the motion and recover the sharp image. In our experiments we acquired 2D TSE images and 3D FLASH/MPRAGE volumes of the human head. Major quality improvements are possible in the 2D case and substantial improvements in the 3D case.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Learning Motor Skills: From Algorithms to Robot Experiments

Kober, J.

Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, March 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Identifying endogenous rhythmic spatio-temporal patterns in micro-electrode array recordings

Besserve, M., Panagiotaropoulos, T., Crocker, B., Kapoor, V., Tolias, A., Panzeri, S., Logothetis, N.

9th annual Computational and Systems Neuroscience meeting (Cosyne), 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Reconstruction using Gaussian mixture models

Joubert, P., Habeck, M.

2012 Gordon Research Conference on Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy (3DEM), 2012 (poster)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Structure and Dynamics of Diffusion Networks

Gomez Rodriguez, M.

Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Learning from Distributions via Support Measure Machines

Muandet, K., Fukumizu, K., Dinuzzo, F., Schölkopf, B.

26th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2012 (poster)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Juggling Increases Interhemispheric Brain Connectivity: A Visual and Quantitative dMRI Study.

Schultz, T., Gerber, P., Schmidt-Wilcke, T.

Vision, Modeling and Visualization (VMV), 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Blind Deconvolution in Scientific Imaging & Computational Photography

Hirsch, M.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
The geometry and statistics of geometric trees

Feragen, A., Lo, P., de Bruijne, M., Nielsen, M., Lauze, F.

T{\"u}bIt day of bioinformatics, June, 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Therapy monitoring of patients with chronic sclerodermic graft-versus-host-disease using PET/MRI

Sauter, A., Schmidt, H., Mantlik, F., Kolb, A., Federmann, B., Bethge, W., Reimold, M., Pfannenberg, C., Pichler, B., Horger, M.

2012 SNM Annual Meeting, 2012 (poster)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Centrality of the Mammalian Functional Brain Network

Besserve, M., Bartels, A., Murayama, Y., Logothetis, N.

42nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Kernel Mean Embeddings of POMDPs

Nishiyama, Y., Boularias, A., Gretton, A., Fukumizu, K.

21st Machine Learning Summer School , 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Semi-Supervised Domain Adaptation with Copulas

Lopez-Paz, D., Hernandez-Lobato, J., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2012 (poster)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Evaluation of Whole-Body MR-Based Attenuation Correction in Bone and Soft Tissue Lesions

Bezrukov, I., Mantlik, F., Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Brendle, C., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS-MIC), 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
The PET Performance Measurements of A Next Generation Dedicated Small Animal PET/MR Scanner

Liu, C., Hossain, M., Bezrukov, I., Wehrl, H., Kolb, A., Judenhofer, M., Pichler, B.

World Molecular Imaging Congress (WMIC), 2012 (poster)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Wasserstoffspeicherkapazität poröser Materialien in Kryoadsorptionstanks

Schlichtenmayer, M.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Behandlung stark nichtkollinearer Magnetisierungsstrukturen mit der Spin-Cluster-Entwicklung

Dietermann, F.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Spinwelleninduziertes Schalten magnetischer Vortexkerne

Kammerer, M.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Die Stabilität des stromtragenden Zustands in MgB2 Schichten mit modifizierter Mikrostruktur

Treiber, S.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Hartmagnetische L10-FePt basierte gro\ssflächige Nanomuster mittels Nanoimprint-Lithografie

Bublat, T.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2003


no image
Texture and haptic cues in slant discrimination: Measuring the effect of texture type on cue combination

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Ernst, M., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 3(12):26, 2003 Fall Vision Meeting of the Optical Society of America, December 2003 (poster)

Abstract
In a number of models of depth cue combination the depth percept is constructed via a weighted average combination of independent depth estimations. The influence of each cue in such average depends on the reliability of the source of information. (Young, Landy, & Maloney, 1993; Ernst & Banks, 2002.) In particular, Ernst & Banks (2002) formulate the combination performed by the human brain as that of the minimum variance unbiased estimator that can be constructed from the available cues. Using slant discrimination and slant judgment via probe adjustment as tasks, we have observed systematic differences in performance of human observers when a number of different types of textures were used as cue to slant (Rosas, Wichmann & Wagemans, 2003). If the depth percept behaves as described above, our measurements of the slopes of the psychometric functions provide the predicted weights for the texture cue for the ranked texture types. We have combined these texture types with object motion but the obtained results are difficult to reconcile with the unbiased minimum variance estimator model (Rosas & Wagemans, 2003). This apparent failure of such model might be explained by the existence of a coupling of texture and motion, violating the assumption of independence of cues. Hillis, Ernst, Banks, & Landy (2002) have shown that while for between-modality combination the human visual system has access to the single-cue information, for within-modality combination (visual cues: disparity and texture) the single-cue information is lost, suggesting a coupling between these cues. Then, in the present study we combine the different texture types with haptic information in a slant discrimination task, to test whether in the between-modality condition the texture cue and the haptic cue to slant are combined as predicted by an unbiased, minimum variance estimator model.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2003


Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Real-Time Face Detection

Kienzle, W.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany, October 2003 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Phase Information and the Recognition of Natural Images

Braun, D., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

6, pages: 138, (Editors: H.H. Bülthoff, K.R. Gegenfurtner, H.A. Mallot, R. Ulrich, F.A. Wichmann), 6. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2003 (poster)

Abstract
Fourier phase plays an important role in determining image structure. For example, when the phase spectrum of an image showing a ower is swapped with the phase spectrum of an image showing a tank, then we will usually perceive a tank in the resulting image, even though the amplitude spectrum is still that of the ower. Also, when the phases of an image are randomly swapped across frequencies, the resulting image becomes impossible to recognize. Our goal was to evaluate the e ect of phase manipulations in a more quantitative manner. On each trial subjects viewed two images of natural scenes. The subject had to indicate which one of the two images contained an animal. The spectra of the images were manipulated by adding random phase noise at each frequency. The phase noise was uniformly distributed in the interval [;+], where  was varied between 0 degree and 180 degrees. Image pairs were displayed for 100 msec. Subjects were remarkably resistant to the addition of phase noise. Even with [120; 120] degree noise, subjects still were at a level of 75% correct. The introduction of phase noise leads to a reduction of image contrast. Subjects were slightly better than a simple prediction based on this contrast reduction. However, when contrast response functions were measured in the same experimental paradigm, we found that performance in the phase noise experiment was signi cantly lower than that predicted by the corresponding contrast reduction.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Constraints measures and reproduction of style in robot imitation learning

Bakir, GH., Ilg, W., Franz, MO., Giese, M.

6, pages: 70, (Editors: H.H. Bülthoff, K.R. Gegenfurtner, H.A. Mallot, R. Ulrich, F.A. Wichmann), 6. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2003 (poster)

Abstract
Imitation learning is frequently discussed as a method for generating complex behaviors in robots by imitating human actors. The kinematic and the dynamic properties of humans and robots are typically quite di erent, however. For this reason observed human trajectories cannot be directly transferred to robots, even if their geometry is humanoid. Instead the human trajectory must be approximated by trajectories that can be realized by the robot. During this approximation deviations from the human trajectory may arise that change the style of the executed movement. Alternatively, the style of the movement might be well reproduced, but the imitated trajectory might be suboptimal with respect to di erent constraint measures from robotics control, leading to non-robust behavior. Goal of the presented work is to quantify this trade-o between \imitation quality" and constraint compatibility for the imitation of complex writing movements. In our experiment, we used trajectory data from human writing movements (see the abstract of Ilg et al. in this volume). The human trajectories were mapped onto robot trajectories by minimizing an error measure that integrates constraints that are important for the imitation of movement style and a regularizing constraint that ensures smooth joint trajectories with low velocities. In a rst experiment, both the end-e ector position and the shoulder angle of the robot were optimized in order to achieve good imitation together with accurate control of the end-e ector position. In a second experiment only the end-e ector trajectory was imitated whereas the motion of the elbow joint was determined using the optimal inverse kinematic solution for the robot. For both conditions di erent constraint measures (dexterity and relative jointlimit distances) and a measure for imitation quality were assessed. By controling the weight of the regularization term we can vary continuously between robot behavior optimizing imitation quality, and behavior minimizing joint velocities.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]