Institute News

The Three Pillars of Fully Autonomous Driving

  • 18 September 2017

Max Planck Lecture 2017

The field of transportation is undergoing a seismic change with the coming introduction of autonomous driving. The technologies required to enable computer driven cars involves the latest cutting edge artificial intelligence algorithms along three major thrusts: Sensing, Planning and Mapping.


ERC Starting Grant for Philipp Hennig

  • 11 September 2017

Project Title PANAMA

Probabilistic Automated Numerical Analysis in Machine learning and Artificial intelligence

Philipp Hennig


NVIDIA CEO presenting the brand new Tesla V100 GPUs at CVPR.

  • 22 August 2017

NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang presented the NVAIL AI Labs with the very first Tesla V100 GPUs, based on NVIDIA's Volta architecture. MPI-IS is among the top centers working at the leading edge of deep learning in computer vision. As such it is recognized by NVIDIA as one of its NVAIL labs and giving the MPI access to the best and latest NVIDIA technology. Huang unveiled these new GPUs at CVPR saying that he wants to put them in the hands of researchers first.

Michael Black Andreas Geiger


4D Movies Capture People in Clothing, Creating Realistic Virtual Try-on

  • 01 August 2017

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) have developed technology to digitally capture clothing on moving people, turn it into a 3D digital form, and dress virtual avatars with it. This new technology makes virtual clothing try-on practical.

Gerard Pons-Moll Sergi Pujades Michael Black


A beacon of light for artificial intelligence

  • 12 July 2017

The Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems is celebrating the opening of its new building in Tübingen

Tübingen, 12. Juli 2017. This opening ceremony involved teamwork between humans and machines. While the robot Apollo held the red ribbon, Minister-President Winfried Kretschmann and Martin Stratmann, President of the Max Planck Society, cut the symbolic cordon to officially open the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems’ new building in Tübingen. They were assisted by Science Minister Theresia Bauer and Stefan Schaal, the Institute’s Managing Director. After a two-and-a-half-year construction period, the scientists recently moved into the Institute building made possible by funding worth millions from the federal state government. They are now conducting basic research on artificial intelligence here.

Michael Black Bernhard Schölkopf Stefan Schaal


The Machine Learning Summer School 2017 is back in Tübingen!

  • 19 June 2017

For the fifth time, the MLSS takes place in Tübingen


Awards for Two Master Theses at the Autonomous Motion Department

  • 07 June 2017

Cédric de Crousaz and Julian Viereck receive the ETH Medal for their outstanding Master Theses

Sebastian Trimpe Ludovic Righetti Julian Viereck Alexander Herzog


Finalist for the Best Robotic Vision Paper

  • 01 June 2017

at the 2017 IEEE/RAS International Conference on Robotics and Automation

The paper "Probabilistic Articulated Real-Time Tracking for Robot Manipulation" by Cristina Garcia Cifuentes, Jan Issac, Manuel Wüthrich, Stefan Schaal and Jeannette Bohg was finalist for the Best Robotic Vision paper at the 2017 IEEE/RAS International Conference on Robotics and Automation.

Cristina Garcia Cifuentes Manuel Wüthrich Jan Issac Stefan Schaal Jeannette Bohg


Release of Bayesian Articulated Object Tracking Libraries

  • 29 May 2017

Robust and real-time Bayesian articulated object tracking methods, implemented in C++ and CUDA.

We release open-source code and data sets on Bayesian articulated object tracking. The library contains approaches towards problems ranging from single object tracking to full robot arm pose estimation. The data sets allow the quantitative evaluation of alternative approaches thanks to accurate ground-truth annotations.

Cristina Garcia Cifuentes Jan Issac Manuel Wüthrich Jeannette Bohg


Gecko-inspired multipurpose gripper

  • 26 May 2017

An elastic membrane covered with tiny fibres paired with a pressure differential enables a new soft gripper system with a high adhesion performance even on curved surfaces

Robots generally need a gripper that adapts to three-dimensional surfaces. Such a gripper needs to be soft to adapt to a great variety of geometries, but not too soft, as it will detach easily and not be able to bear weight for very long. Researchers working with Metin Sitti at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart developed a membrane equipped with microscopic fibres inspired by the fine hairs on a gecko's foot and attached it to a suction cup-like flexible body. An internal pressure differential ensures perfect conformation of the flexible gripper to a wide variety of surfaces and equally distributes the load over the entire contact interface. As a result, the researchers suppressed load induced stress concentrations at the edges, which strongly reduced the adhesion. The gripper demonstrates a 14-times higher adhesion than grippers without this load sharing mechanism.