Institute Talks

Meta-learning statistics and augmentations for few shot learning

IS Colloquium
  • 25 September 2017 • 11:15 12:15
  • Amos Storkey
  • Tübingen, MPI_IS Lecture Hall (ground floor)

In this talk I introduce the neural statistician as an approach for meta learning. The neural statistician learns to appropriately summarise datasets through a learnt statistic vector. This can be used for few shot learning, by computing the statistic vectors for the presented data, and using these statistics as context variables for one-shot classification and generation. I will show how we can generalise the neural statistician to a context aware learner that learns to characterise and combine independently learnt contexts. I will also demonstrate an approach for meta-learning data augmentation strategies. Acknowledgments: This work is joint work with Harri Edwards, Antreas Antoniou, and Conor Durkan.

Organizers: Philipp Hennig


The Gentle Robot

Talk
  • 27 September 2017 • 13:13 14:50
  • Prof. Sami Haddadin
  • Main Seminar Room (N0.002)

Enabling robots for interaction with humans and unknown environments has been one of the primary goals of robotics research over decades. I will outline how human-centered robot design, nonlinear soft-robotics control inspired by human neuromechanics and physics grounded learning algorithms will let robots become a commodity in our near-future society. In particular, compliant and energy-controlled ultra-lightweight systems capable of complex collision handling enable high-performance human assistance over a wide variety of application domains. Together with novel methods for dynamics and skill learning, flexible and easy-to-use robotic power tools and systems can be designed. Recently, our work has led to the first next generation robot Franka Emika that has recently become commercially available. The system is able to safely interact with humans, execute and even learn sensitive manipulation skills, is affordable and designed as a distributed interconnected system.

Organizers: Eva Laemmerhirt


Dominik Bach - TBA

IS Colloquium
  • 02 October 2017 • 11:15 12:15
  • Dominik Bach

The Three Pillars of Fully Autonomous Driving

Talk
  • 18 September 2017 • 11:00 12:00
  • Prof. Amnon Shashua
  • MPI_IS Stuttgart, Lecture Room 2 D5

The field of transportation is undergoing a seismic change with the coming introduction of autonomous driving. The technologies required to enable computer driven cars involves the latest cutting edge artificial intelligence algorithms along three major thrusts: Sensing, Planning and Mapping. Prof. Amnon Shashua, Co-founder and Chairman of Mobileye, will describe the challenges and the kind of machine learning algorithms involved, but will do that through the perspective of Mobileye’s activity in this domain.


A locally Adaptive Normal Distribution

Talk
  • 05 September 2017 • 14:00 15:30
  • Georgios Arvanitidis
  • S2 Seminar Room

The fundamental building block in many learning models is the distance measure that is used. Usually, the linear distance is used for simplicity. Replacing this stiff distance measure with a flexible one could potentially give a better representation of the actual distance between two points. I will present how the normal distribution changes if the distance measure respects the underlying structure of the data. In particular, a Riemannian manifold will be learned based on observations. The geodesic curve can then be computed—a length-minimizing curve under the Riemannian measure. With this flexible distance measure we get a normal distribution that locally adapts to the data. A maximum likelihood estimation scheme is provided for inference of the parameters mean and covariance, and also, a systematic way to choose the parameter defining the Riemannian manifold. Results on synthetic and real world data demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed model to fit non-trivial probability distributions.

Organizers: Philipp Hennig


  • Prof. Dr. Hedvig Kjellström
  • N3.022 / Aquarium

In this talk I will first outline my different research projects. I will then focus on the EACare project, a quite newly started multi-disciplinary collaboration with the aim to develop an embodied system, capable of carrying out neuropsychological tests to detect early signs of dementia, e.g., due to Alzheimer's disease. The system will use methods from Machine Learning and Social Robotics, and be trained with examples of recorded clinician-patient interactions. The interaction will be developed using a participatory design approach. I describe the scope and method of the project, and report on a first Wizard of Oz prototype.


  • Yeara Kozlov
  • Aquarium

Creating convincing human facial animation is challenging. Face animation is often hand-crafted by artists separately from body motion. Alternatively, if the face animation is derived from motion capture, it is typically performed while the actor is relatively still. Recombining the isolated face animation with body motion is non-trivial and often results in uncanny results if the body dynamics are not properly reflected on the face (e.g. cheeks wiggling when running). In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of human soft tissue simulation and control. I will then present our method for adding physical effects to facial blendshape animation. Unlike previous methods that try to add physics to face rigs, our method can combine facial animation and rigid body motion consistently while preserving the original animation as closely as possible. Our novel simulation framework uses the original animation as per-frame rest-poses without adding spurious forces. We also propose the concept of blendmaterials to give artists an intuitive means to control the changing material properties due to muscle activation.

Organizers: Timo Bolkart


Metrics Matter, Examples from Binary and Multilabel Classification

IS Colloquium
  • 21 August 2017 • 11:15 12:15
  • Sanmi Koyejo
  • Empirical Inference meeting room (MPI-IS building, 4th floor)

Performance metrics are a key component of machine learning systems, and are ideally constructed to reflect real world tradeoffs. In contrast, much of the literature simply focuses on algorithms for maximizing accuracy. With the increasing integration of machine learning into real systems, it is clear that accuracy is an insufficient measure of performance for many problems of interest. Unfortunately, unlike accuracy, many real world performance metrics are non-decomposable i.e. cannot be computed as a sum of losses for each instance. Thus, known algorithms and associated analysis are not trivially extended, and direct approaches require expensive combinatorial optimization. I will outline recent results characterizing population optimal classifiers for large families of binary and multilabel classification metrics, including such nonlinear metrics as F-measure and Jaccard measure. Perhaps surprisingly, the prediction which maximizes the utility for a range of such metrics takes a simple form. This results in simple and scalable procedures for optimizing complex metrics in practice. I will also outline how the same analysis gives optimal procedures for selecting point estimates from complex posterior distributions for structured objects such as graphs. Joint work with Nagarajan Natarajan, Bowei Yan, Kai Zhong, Pradeep Ravikumar and Inderjit Dhillon.

Organizers: Mijung Park


Challenges of writing and maintaining programs for robots

Talk
  • 04 August 2017 • 11:30 12:45
  • Mirko Bordignon
  • AMD meeting

Writing and maintaining programs for robots poses some interesting challenges. It is hard to generalize them, as their targets are more than computing platforms. It can be deceptive to see them as input to output mappings, as interesting environments result in unpredictable inputs, and mixing reactive and deliberative behavior make intended outputs hard to define. Given the wide and fragmented landscape of components, from hardware to software, and the parties involved in providing and using them, integration is also a non-trivial aspect. The talk will illustrate the work ongoing at Fraunhofer IPA to tackle these challenges, how Open Source is its common trait, and how this translates into the industrial field thanks to the ROS-Industrial initiative.

Organizers: Vincent Berenz


Low-dimensional Data Embedding via Robust Ranking

Talk
  • 25 July 2017 • 4:30 5:30
  • Manfred K. Warmuth
  • Seminar room N4.022, department Schölkopf (4th floor)

Organizers: Bernhard Schölkopf


  • Ioannis Papantonis
  • S2 Seminar Room

We present a way to set the step size of Stochastic Gradient Descent, as the solution of a distance minimization problem. The obtained result has an intuitive interpretation and resembles the update rules of well known optimization algorithms. Also, asymptotic results to its relation to the optimal learning rate of Gradient Descent are discussed. In addition, we talk about two different estimators, with applications in Variational inference problems, and present approximate results about their variance. Finally, we combine all of the above, to present an optimization algorithm that can be used on both mini-batch optimization and Variational problems.

Organizers: Philipp Hennig


  • Azzurra Ruggeri

How do young children learn so much about the world, and so efficiently? This talk presents the recent studies investigating theoretically and empirically how children actively seek information in their physical and social environments as evidence to test and dynamically revise their hypotheses and theories over time. In particular, it will focus on how children adapt their active learning strategies. such as question-asking and explorative behavior, in response to the task characteristics, to the statistical structure of the hypothesis space, and to the feedback received. Such adaptiveness and flexibility is crucial to achieve efficiency in situations of uncertainty, when testing alternative hypotheses, making decisions, drawing causal inferences and solving categorization tasks.

Organizers: Philipp Hennig Georg Martius


Machines that learn to see and move

Talk
  • 12 July 2017 • 17:00 18:00
  • Prof. Andrew Blake
  • MPI-IS, ground floor seminar room, N0.002

Neural networks have taken the world of computing in general and AI in particular by storm. But in the future, AI will need to revisit generative models. There are several reasons for this – system robustness, precision, transparency, and the high cost of labelling data. This is particularly true of perceptual AI, as needed for autonomous vehicles, where also the need for simulators and the need to confront novel situations, also will demand generative, probabilistic models.

Organizers: Bernhard Schölkopf Michael Black Stefan Schaal